the last tasmanian

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Back From The Dead? Reported Sightings Fuel Hope For Return Of Tasmanian Tigers

It has been more than eight decades since the last known Tasmanian tiger died. In that time, the marsupial has become the stuff of textbook sketches and yellowing photographs, little more than a memory aging into oblivion.

But Thylacinus cynocephalus may still be out there.

 Recent “plausible sightings” have challenged the accepted wisdom that the animal has gone extinct — and have inspired researchers at Australia’s James Cook University to commence a quest to find it themselves.

Let’s clarify one thing right away: this animal is no feline. In fact, it’s a marsupial — in the same family as kangaroos — but its face looks a lot like a dog.

“It’s a dog with a pouch,” the university’s Sandra Abell tells All Things Considered. She’s one of the people leading the search in Queensland, Australia.

The Tasmanian tiger, in this photograph taken while the species was still around. terr-bo/Flickr

A Tasmanian tiger in captivity, circa 1930. It is believed that the last wild thylacine was shot in 1930 and the last captive one died in 1936.  Topical Press Agency/Getty Images            

The Last Tasmanian

Tasmanian, any member of the extinct Australoid population of Tasmania. The Tasmanians were an isolate population of Aboriginal Australians, not a separate or distinctive population, who were cut off from the mainland when a general rise in the sea level flooded the Bass Strait about 10,000 years ago. Their population upon the arrival of European explorers in the 17th and 18th centuries has been estimated at about 4,000. They were a relatively short people, with generally Australoid physical characteristics. The Tasmanians spoke languages that were unintelligible to mainland Aborigines.

The island was divided among several tribes speaking different dialects, each with a delimited hunting territory. Subsistence was based on hunting land and sea mammals and collecting shellfish and vegetable food. In warm months the Tasmanians moved through the open forest and moorlands of the interior in bands or family groups of 15 to 50 people; in colder months they moved to the coast. Occasionally, bands gathered together for a corroboree (a dance celebrating important events), a hunt, or for protection against attack.

Wooden spears, waddies (clubs, or throwing sticks), and flaked-stone tools and weapons were produced. Bone implements, basketry, and bark canoes for coastal travel were also made. A few rock carvings depicting natural objects and conventionalized symbols have survived.

The first permanent white settlement was made in Tasmania in 1803; in 1804 an unprovoked attack by whites on a group of Tasmanians was the first episode in the Black War. The whites treated the Aborigines as subhumans, seizing their hunting grounds, depleting their food supply, attacking the women, and killing the men. Tasmanian attempts to resist were met with the superior weaponry and force of the Europeans. Between 1831 and 1835, in a final effort at conciliation and to prevent the extermination of the approximately 200 remaining Tasmanians, the Aborigines were removed to Flinders Island. Their social organization and traditional way of life destroyed, subjected to alien disease and attempts to “civilize” them, they soon died. Truganini (d. 1876), a Tasmanian woman who aided the resettlement on Flinders Island, was the last full-blooded Aborigine in Tasmania. Another Tasmanian woman is said to have survived on Kangaroo Island in South Australia until 1888.

‘Benjamin’ - The last known Thylacine, (Tasmanian Tiger, Tasmanian Wolf) pictured at the Beaumaris Zoo, Hobart, Tasmania. He died on 7 September 1936 - two months after the Tasmanian government was finally persuaded to provide legal protection for the species.

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The Hunter

Watched this movie out of random when I was looking through Netflix and didn’t expect much, but it was actually pretty good. Dafoe plays the role of a professional hunter hired to find the last Tasmanian Tiger. According to imfdb, the rifle is a Keppeler KS-V Bullpup. Very obscure rifle made in Germany and as far as I know, they aren’t imported into the U.S. (GRH)

An endling is the term for the last member of a species or subspecies. When an endling dies, it’s species become extinct. There have been several endlings in recent times - Martha, who was the last passenger pigeon, died in 1914 in Cincinnati Zoo. The photo above shows Benjamin, the last Tasmanian Tiger, who lived out the last of his days in Hobart Zoo before he died on 7 September, 1936. Humans can often be an occurring theme in the story of endlings and this was the case for Benjamin, who died of neglect. Probably the most well known endling is Lonesome George, the Pinta Island giant tortoise, who died in 2012.

It’s a sombre day

Today, September 7, marks the 80th anniversary of the death of the last known thylacine (aka Tasmanian wolf/tiger). After keepers forgot to let it in for the night the animal, commonly known as “Benjamin”, froze to death in the outside portion of its enclosure.

Captured in the Florentine Valley of Tasmania in 1933 by Elias Churchill, the animal was sent to the Hobart Zoo where it lived out the last 3 years of its life, many years later becoming one of the main poster children of extinction.

Rest easy Benjamin (??? - Sept 7 1936).

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79 years ago, on September 7, 1936, the world’s last Tasmanian Tiger passed away in captivity.
Though the animal is officially extinct, there have been over 600 sightings since 1936.

Once You See These Rare Historical Photos, You’ll Never Forget Them

Find out below some of the most fascinating photographs ever captured on camera. Thanks to these great images, we now have before us a rare window to some of the most interesting moments of our world history.

1. A boxing match on board the USS Oregon in 1897

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2. An airman being captured by Vietnamese in Truc Bach Lake, Hanoi in 1967. The airman is John McCain.

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3. Samurai warriors taken between 1860 and 1880

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4. A shell-shocked reindeer looks on as war planes drop bombs on Russia in 1941.

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5. Walt Disney on the day they opened Disney Studios

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6. Che Guevara enjoying a drink

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7. The Microsoft staff in 1978

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8. The last known Tasmanian Tiger (now extinct) photographed in 1933

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9. German air raid on Moscow in 1941

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10. Winston Churchill out for a swim

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11. The London sky after a bombing and dogfight between British and German planes in 1940

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12. Martin Luther King, Jr removes a burned cross from his yard in 1960. The boy is his son.

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13. Google begins.

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14. Nagasaki, 20 minutes after the atomic bombing in 1945

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15. The only photograph of a living Quagga (now extinct) from 1870

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16. Hitler’s bunker

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17. A Japanese plane is shot down during the Battle of Saipan in 1944.

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18. The original Ronald McDonald played by Willard Scott

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19. The first photo taken from space in 1946

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20. British SAS back from a 3-month patrol of North Africa in 1943

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21. Disneyland employee cafeteria in 1961

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22. The first McDonalds

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23. Fidel Castro lays a wreath at the Lincoln Memorial.

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24. George S. Patton’s dog mourning his master on the day of his death.

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25. California lumberjacks working on Redwoods

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26. Construction of the Berlin Wall in 1961

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27. Bread and soup during the Great Depression

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28. The 1912 World Series

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29. The first photo following the discovery of Machu Pichu in 1912.

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30. Construction of Christ the Redeemer in Rio da Janeiro, Brazil

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31. Steamboats on the Mississippi River in 1907

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32. Leo Tolstoy telling a story to his grandchildren in 1909

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33. The construction of Disneyland

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34. Arnold Schwarzenegger on the day he received his American citizenship

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35. 14-year-old Osama bin Laden (2nd from the right)

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36. Construction of the Statue of Liberty in 1884

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37. Albert Einstein’s office photographed on the day of his death

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38. A liberated Jew holds a Nazi guard at gunpoint.

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39. Construction of the Manhattan Bridge in 1908

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40. Construction of the Eiffel Tower in 1888

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41. Dismantling of the Berlin Wall in 1989

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42. Titanic leaves port in 1912.

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43. Adolf Hitler’s pants after the failed assassination attempt at Wolf’s Lair in 1944

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44. ENIAC, the first computer ever built

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45. Brighton Swimming Club in 1863

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46. Ferdinand Porsche (yeah, that Porsche) showing a model of the Volkswagen Beetle to Adolf Hitler in 1935

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47. The unbroken seal on King Tut’s tomb

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48. Apollo 16 astronaut Charles Duke left this family photo behind on the moon in 1972.

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49. The crew of Apollo 1 practicing their water landing in 1966. Unfortunately, all of them were killed on the launch pad in a fire.

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50. An aircraft crash on board during World War II

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51. Henry Ford, Thomas Edison, Warren G. Harding (29th president of USA), and Harvey Samuel Firestone (founder of Firestone Tire and Rubber Co.) talking together

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“Endling” might just be the loneliest term in the English language. An endling is the last member of a species or subspecies, and when this lone individual dies its species is extinct. Several endlings have been recorded in recent times. Martha, the last passenger pigeon, died in 1914 in Cincinnatti Zoo. She was the last of a species that had numbered several billion before Europeans arrived in North America. Human actions are a oft-repeated theme in the story of endlings. The animal in the photo is Benjamin, the last thylacine (or Tasmanian Tiger). Benjamin - who may have actually been female - lived out his days in Hobart Zoo. On the 7th of September, 1936, Benjamin died due to neglect. Other species endlings have included the last quagga and the Caspian tiger, though there are certainly more we don’t know of.  Perhaps the most well-known recent endling is the Pinta Island giant tortoise Lonesome George, who died on 24th June last year. George’s status as an endling may be rescinded in time; DNA from 17 hybrid tortoises indicates that they have some genetic material from George’s subspecies. Given tortoises’ long lifespans, the researchers have hope that the hybrids’ parents may still be alive somewhere on the Galápagos islands. Unless these purebred specimens are found (if they are still alive), Lonesome George holds a special place as our most famous and recent endling.

themyskira  asked:

Hey, just so you know, it's considered problematic to refer to Indigenous Australians as "full-blooded" (or "half-blooded", "half-caste", etc.) because such terms were historically used to define them by white authorities intent on eliminating them through forced assimilation, stealing of children from their families and "breeding out the blackness". Truganini herself was referred to as “the last of the now extinct native Tasmanians” well into the latter half of the 20th century, discounting and

(themyskira continues):

[2] erasing the Aboriginality of Tasmania’s contemporary Aboriginal community. Labelling Truganini the “last full-blooded Tasmanian person”, as many writers continue to do today, feeds into this erasure and harkens back to a time when Aboriginality was regarded as something that could be diluted by white blood and ultimately “bred out”.

Quite right! This is why I continually put “last” in quotation marks, because it’s a) stupid, and b) inaccurate. It’s why I left any mention of that to the end of the story, and why I talked about the resurgence of the Palawa people directly after said mention. I see the erroneous label as an important part of her story, because by referring to her as that, it helped build awareness among the colonists of how monstrous they were being.

That said, it deserves wider explanation in the entry, so I’m adding a footnote about that directly after I publish this. Thanks for the note!