the last scene of this film was so beautifully done

Let's just take a second to look at how perfect G.B.F. is

This new movie G.B.F. (gay best friend) is everything tumblr’s been looking for. First of all, the theme to the movie:

It’s something I don’t think I’ve ever seen addressed in a movie before: How it’s not okay to objectify a group of people and use others to boost your social status.

But that’s not all. This movie points out a million gay stereotypes, and does it in a way that makes people realize just how stupid and harmful they really are. It uses gay jokes that are usually used in movies in order to turn a gay character into comic relief, but turns them around. Instead, the jokes are done to make fun of the people who objectify gay guys. And it does it BEAUTIFULLY.

It also shows how wrong it is to out somebody without their permission and PROMOTES SEXUAL CONSENT. MULTIPLE TIMES.

When one of the main romantic interests of the filmcomes onto Tanner and Tanner gets nervous the romantic interest says (and I quote): “I get it. You’re not there yet. So if you don’t mind, I’m gonna bounce." And then he does. That’s it. Consent, man. 

One last scene. This is near the end of the film. Caprice is one of the main diva’s of the school, and like so many of the other characters, is obsessed with social status. She’s one of the girls who tries to use Tanner, the first gay guy to come out at the school, to make herself more popular because a "G.B.F.” has become a sign of social status. And then this happens to her: 

BOOM. HOW DOES IT FEEL?

So if you haven’t yet: SEE THIS MOVIE. You won’t regret it. 

7

Haikyuu!! Movies: Sainou to Sensu | Konseputo no Tatakai

HUMAX Cinema Ikebukuro, Tokyo

September 15 - October 12

Photos mine. For similar Japan-based original posts, you may follow me or track the #my original content tag on my blog.


Sainou to sensu spoilers (with feelings) under the cut!

Keep reading

Best of 2013

Here at OCD, we like to do things slightly differently, like wait until the end of January to publish our ‘Best of 2013’ list.

So here are the top ten films we saw last year, we cannot recommend every single one enough:

1. Blue is the Warmest Colour (La Vie D'Adele)

Winner of the Palme d'Or, Abdellatif Kechiche’s masterpiece, starring Adele Exarchopoulos & Lea Seydoux, is one of the best films I have seen in my entire life, let alone in the last year. Beautifully shot, mind-blowing and heart-wrenching performances. Simply stunning, a cinematic masterpiece. How storytelling should always be done. Watch out particularly for the bar scene at the beginning (above) and the cafe scene at the end, the most moving and truthful character and relationship development you’ll ever see.

2. Short Term 12

Adapted into a feature by Destin Cretton from his own short film of 2008, Short Term 12 is nuanced, delicate storytelling with a powerful message at its heart. Brie Larson shines as Grace, a supervisor at a residential treatment facility taking care of everyone but herself. The young cast provide brilliant support, particularly Keith Stanfield and Kaitlyn Dever as Marcus and Jayden, the rap sequence and shark story will steal your hearts.

3. 12 Years A Slave

Steve McQueen. Chiwetel Ejiofor. Michael Fassbender. Lupita Nyong'o.
A true story so important and so moving, it’s difficult to understand why it isn’t widely known. 

4. Side Effects

Very rarely am I tricked when watching a film. Soderbergh managed it here, and I loved every second of it. Mara steals the show as the troubled Emily, with great turns from Law & Zeta-Jones as two of the Doctors who treat her. A carefully crafted plot, allowed to play out beautifully by Soderbergh, in what was - at the time - to be his final film.

5. Blue Jasmine

Woody Allen. Cate Blanchett. Cate Blanchett. Cate Blanchett. Cate Blanchett. Cate Blanchett. Cate Blanchett. Cate Blanchett. Sally Hawkins. Alec Baldwin. Peter Sarsgaard. Cate Blanchett. Cate Blanchett. Cate Blanchett.




Cate. Blanchett.

6. Blackfish

Watch it. Then make everyone you know watch it. You won’t believe it until you see it, then you’ll start to question a whole lot of things. Heart-breaking, anger-inducing. FUCK SEAWORLD.

7. In A World…

Winner of 'Best Screenplay’ at Sundance 2013, you’ll understand why only a minutes into the film. Bell manages to take a concept that on paper seems pretty dull, and turns it into a hilarious, moving, and brilliantly human film, where not one word is wasted. Not only the writer and director, Bell captains the film as its lead, one that you fall in love with instantly, and root for against all odds. Peppered with bizarre and brilliant cameos, with a great supporting cast, In A World will leave you grinning from ear to ear, and have you speaking in a trailer voice for weeks.

8. The East

Zal Batmanglij and Brit Marling’s second feature-length collaboration might not have the diamond-in-the-rough charm of 'Sound of My Voice’ but its a film that proves they’re more than a match for - and better than -  the big players of Hollywood. A bigger (but still modest) budget allows for a more adventurous story, better cinematography and a cast including some of the best actors currently on the scene - particularly Ellen Page and Toby Kebbell. As with everything Marling, Batmaglij (and fellow collaborator Mike Cahill) seem to touch, you are guaranteed quality story telling told in an unconventional and thought-provoking fashion. It’s difficult to remind ourselves that these talented filmmakers haven’t been around for long. We cannot wait to see what’s next.

9. The Bling Ring

Somewhat overlooked by many, Sofia Coppola’s 'The Bling Ring’ is a very well put together piece of cinema. The story lacks depth, but so do those the story centres on, the shallow, celebrity-obsessed, media-fuelled youth - so in that respect it is a perfect representation of everything Coppola is trying to say. The performances from the five leads are pitch perfect, they are easy to hate and yet we can find ourselves very easily sucked into their world, wanting to see just how far they will get.
Based on a shocking true story, the film is beautifully shot, and there are certain facts uncovered that suddenly make the story seem inevitable, in fact, why had this not happened before? Coppola lets the story breathe, which works wonders, she doesn’t need to preach anything, she simply holds up a mirror up to Hollywood, and Hollywood does the rest. It’s not a pretty sight.

10. The Call

The film last year that we found ourselves sitting on the edge of our seats throughout. The film we saw last year that had the most active audience participation. People were gripping their seat arms, shouting out 'No!’ on multiple occasions. If you wipe from your memory the last 60-90 seconds of the film, you have yourselves the perfect example of a thriller.