the last mohicans

Hey Everyone! When I was younger, I used to read a ton. As a direct result of that, my writing and reading were on point. Recently, however, I haven’t been reading as much, and as a result, my writing isn’t as good as I want it to be (albeit, still pretty good). I’ve decided to read all the books on this list over the next 1 and a half years to get back into reading and to improve my writing. Enjoy! :)

1. To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee

2. The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

3. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

4. Animal Farm by George Orwell

5. Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë

6. The Catcher in the Rye by JD Salinger

7. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

8. Macbeth by William Shakespeare

9. Lord of the Flies by William Golding

10. Hamlet by William Shakespeare

11. Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

12. The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne

13. Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare

14. A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens

15. The Ecological Rift by John Bellamy Foster, Brett Clark, Richard York

16. This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs The Climate by Naomi Klein

17. Catch-22 by Joseph Heller

18. The Crucible by Arthur Miller

19. The Odyssey by Homer

20. The Red Badge of Courage by Stephen Crane

21. Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë

22. Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut

23. Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe

24. The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer 

25. The Stranger by Albert Camus

26. Frankenstein by Mary Shelly

27. The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck

28. Beowulf by Unknown

29. The Systems View of Life: A Unifying Vision by Fritjof Capra, Luigi Luisi

30. All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque

31. A Midsummer Night’s Dream by William Shakespeare

32. Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad

33. Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson

34. The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams 

35. Faust: First Part by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

36. Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

37. The Awakening by Kate Chopin

38. Candide by Voltaire

39. The Color Purple by Alice Walker

40. The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka

41. Oedipus Rex by Sophocles

42. Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe

43. Steppenwolf by Hermann Hesse

44. One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

45. The Bell Jar by Slyvia Plath

46. The Call of the Wild by Jack London

47. Walden by Henry David Thoreau

48. Antigone by Sophocles

49. Things Fall Apart (The African Trilogy, #1) by Chinua Achebe

50. Gulliver’s Travels by Jonathan Swift

51. The Last of the Mohicans (The Leatherstocking Tales #2) by James Fenimore Cooper

52. Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert

53. Beloved by Toni Morrison

54. Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray

55. Selected Tales by Edgar Allen Poe

56. Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

57. 1984 by George Orwell

58. Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes 

59. The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner

60. One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel García Márquez

61. The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde

62. A Good Man is Hard to Find and Other Stories by Flannery O’Connor

63. Pygmalion by George Bernard Shaw

64. As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner

65. Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison

66. The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas

67. A Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen

68. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass by Frederick Douglass

69. Tess of the D’Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy

70. A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway

71. A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man by James Joyce

72. Waiting for Godot by Samuel Beckett

73. Moby-Dick; or, The Whale by Herman Melville

74. The Iliad by Homer

75. Inferno (The Divine Comedy #1) by Dante Alighieri

76. Babbitt by Sinclair Lewis

77. An American Tragedy by Theodore Dreiser 

78. The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling by Henry Fielding

79. Long Day’s Journey into Night by Eugene O’Neill

80. War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy

81. Cyrano de Bergac by Edmond Rostand

82. The Hunchback of Notre-Dame by Victor Hugo

83. The Mill on the Floss by George Elliot

84. The Cherry Orchard by Anton Chekhov

85. Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston

86. Bartleby the Scrivener by Herman Melville

87. Doctor Zhivago by Boris Pasternak

88. The House of Mirth by Edith Wharton

89. Selected Essays by Ralph Waldo Emerson

90. Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman

91. The Good Soldier by Ford Madox Ford

92. Call it Sleep by Henry Roth

93. Fathers and Sons by Ivan Turgenev

94. The Portrait of a Lady by Henry James

95. The Adventures of Augie March by Saul Bellow

96. A Death in the Family by James Agee

97. The Turn of the Screw by Henry James

98. The Magic Mountain by Thomas Mann

99. Go Tell It on the Mountain by James Baldwin

100. Death Comes for the Archbishop by Willa Carther

101. To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf

4

Q: Daniel, I see you every day. When I walk into my daughter’s room there’s a major picture of The Last of The Mohicans. And she is a teenager – I’m sure that’s not the only teenager in the world that has your picture. How does it feel? There are a lot of girls that really like you. Does that embarrass you basically or are you just flattered?

ew.com
'Outlander' Season 3 Teaser Leaks Online: A Deep-Dive Analysis
The show is set to return in September

“I have lied, killed and broken trust, but when I stand before God I’ll have one thing to say to weigh against all the rest…”

With that one simple but oh-so-passionate line of dialogue, the ongoing Droughtlander became a little less painful Sunday after Starz dropped its first official tease for season 3 of Outlander that was almost immediately leaked online for all those non-Starz subscribers. So much for trying to get folks to tune into the premiere of The White Princess on the west coast!

Was the teaser effective? You bet. Anytime you have a man saying, “Lord, you gave me a rare woman,” you’re going to have the female fans swooning. But there was so much more to whet our appetites, Sassenachs, which is why I’ve decided to take a deep dive into the teaser — because it may be all we’ll get for quite some time. (Can September seem ANY further away?)

How is it possible that one look from Claire can convey anguish, longing, and the sobering realization that she may never see her beloved Jamie (Sam Heughan) ever again? Caitriona Balfe does it magnificently, as she prepares to return through the stones at Craigh na Dun to resume her old life with first husband Frank Randall (Tobias Menzies) in the 20th century.

Hey, this moment should look familiar to EW Readers! In our exclusive first look cover from September, executive producer Ronald D. Moore talks about his plan to re-enact the Battle of Culloden in the opening episode. Our issue also included a first look of Claire walking through the battlefield during an eerie dream sequence. “It just felt like for the TV show, we’ve been promising this for a while and it just felt like we should have something,” Moore told EW of the conflict that was first teased in the season 2 finale between the French-backed highlanders and the British army. “We should give the audience some sense of what happened on that moor.”

Someone’s looking pretty good for her age here! I’ve got a little scoop for you, Outlander fans: Don’t expect Claire or Jamie to look like they’ve aged much in season 3, even though 20 years will have gone by since the lovers last saw each other. “I think they really wanted to not have us change too much,” Balfe tells me exclusively while shooting in South Africa. “The aging has been really subtle. There’s a bit of weathering and stuff that we’ve done, but it’s been very subtle.”

Oh, Sophie Skelton! So great to see you reprise the role of Brianna, Claire and Jamie’s daughter, at the start of season 3. But I fear her appearance in these 20th century scenes with mommy and her adopted dad Frank (Tobias Menzies) will be the extent of her work in the new season. Catch you more in season 4, girlfriend?

Ah, an old movie trope that never gets old — the shot of a hand dragging over the gorgeous flora as a sentimental shout-out to home. The last hot guy to do this so well was Maximus (aka Russell Crowe), as he prepares for death in the final scene of Gladiator.

Okay, so maybe this sight of 20th century Claire rushing through her Boston hospital in scrubs means nothing to the story. But I ask you, Outlander fans, is there anything more exhilarating than the sight of gorgeous medical personnel rushing to an emergency? Look no further than those swell nurses from the title sequence of M*A*S*H*.

Dang, that was quick! After stopping and starting the video at least 15 times, I surmised that it’s probably the moment when Jamie shoots the Earl of Ellesmere after he threatens to hurt a certain child. Out of respect for the non-book readers, I’ll refrain from any further details.

“I’ll find you. I promise.”

Okay, the images threw me for a bit; was Voyager so long that I simply can’t remember this particular scene? Fortunately, a key source who shall go unnamed hinted that it’s most likely a depiction of the Silkies Island, home of the hidden treasure. Apparently, author Diana Gabaldon didn’t explicitly describe the island in her books so it appears this is all from the great minds of Moore and production designer Jon Gary Steele. Whatever; I just liked this part the most because it made me think of Daniel Day-Lewis telling Madeleine Stowe that he will find her, “no matter how long it takes, no matter how far” in The Last of the Mohicans. Be still my heart!

Any other observations from the 30-second trailer? Sound off below!

Outlander returns to Starz in September.