the horrors,

“So Goth, I Was BORN Black”

How Screamin’ Jay Hawkins Spearheaded the Goth Music Movement

In the recording studios of OKeh, a man, simply named Jay, walked in with a team of musicians, with the intention to record a heart-wrenching love ballad, filled with mourning. What resulted however, would shake up the music industry forever. Just after Halloween, the chill of one drunken, November evening in 1956 brought us one of the most iconic, perplexing, and somewhat horrifying pieces of music ever recorded. This was how “I Put A Spell On You” was born.

Prior to the inception of the 50s classic, Hollywood was already being re-infected by the Horror bug. The invention of Vampira, the popularity of American actor Vincent Price, and the rise of B-movie Horror flicks cemented a public love for the macabre, as established in the 30s, with Universal Studios’ Dracula, and Frankenstein. Bela Lugosi and Boris Karloff were monster legends on the silver screen. Vampira, the queen of the television screen. But no one was making waves in the music scene to inject this beloved aesthetic into sound. How Jay Hawkins’ “Spell” was born was a complete accident, but those around him knew they had something special on their hands, from the moment they heard Hawkins’ vocal delivery.

The rare, original recording of “I Put a Spell on You” (now available on YouTube), was a simple, sad blues tune, that may or may not have entered the public’s consciousness had it been released as is. This version was recorded for Grand Records, in late 1955. Nearly a year passes, and Jay chooses to re-record it for OKeh Records, this time with producer Arnold Maxin on board. The story goes, Maxin brought in food and drink (plenty of drink) for Jay and his musicians, turning the session into an evening of inebriated music making.

“[The producer] brought in ribs and chicken and got everybody drunk, and we came out with this weird version … I don’t even remember making the record. Before, I was just a normal blues singer. I was just Jay Hawkins. It all sort of just fell in place. I found out I could do more destroying a song and screaming it to death.” -Screamin’ Jay Hawkins

Thus, the “Spell” was complete, and in November of 1956, OKeh Records released “I Put a Spell on You”, under his new artist name, “Screamin’” Jay Hawkins. No records prior bear the moniker “Screamin’” in front of his name (see: Discogs).

Alan Freed, a Cleveland disc jockey, approached Hawkins about playing up his image, to draw the most out of this newfound success, including the wild idea of rising up out of a coffin for one of his performances. The rest, as they say, was history. Combining the aesthetic of Vincent Price (and coincidently his mustache), and an aura of Haitian voodooism, his act was born. He became the subject of mass media attention in the 50s, side by side with the best of the Horror scene. He was one of them; taking the derogatory “spook”, and turning it on its head—reclaimed, and turned into profit.

What Screamin’ Jay Hawkins created is what we now associate today with Shock Rock. The main features being his vocal delivery, his wardrobe, and props used on the stage to give macabre effects. With the 1960s came the first wave of Shock Rockers, directly influenced by the path Hawkins had carved out for them. Screaming Lord Sutch, of out London, used British Horror imagery, such as the legend of Jack the Ripper, to form his artist identity. Arthur Brown, who has covered Hawkins’ hit, wore corpse paint, and wore a flaming helmet upon his head in live performances. The Spiders, Alice Cooper’s original band name (1964-1967), performed with a huge, black spider’s web as their first ever stage prop. In the 70s, The Cramps, notable Gothabilly band, also claimed influence by Hawkins. And with these acts introduce a long line of Goth Rock history, that may not sound alike at times, but all descend from the same tree.

GET PSYCHED Pt. 2 (listen)
joshinthewoods

01. 1998 (Delicious) - Peace
02. Elegant Design - Pond
03. Heavy Horse - Jacuzzi Boys
04. 1963 - Heavy Beach
05. No Need For A Leader - Unknown Mortal Orchestra
06. Animals - The Ghost Of A Saber Tooth Tiger
07. Ivy Covered House - Ducktails
08. Do You Remember - The Horrors

Soprano, Rachel Zeffira To Feature In Upcoming Historical Gangster Film ONCE UPON A TIME IN LONDON (8 May 2017)

Rachel Zeffira, the talented, award-winning Canadian soprano, famous for her work as one-half of alt-pop duo ‘Cat’s Eyes’, has composed a number of songs for director Simon Rumley’s historical gangster thriller feature film ONCE UPON A TIME IN LONDON, which is currently shooting in the East End. Rachel also appears in the movie as a singer in a 1940’s’ club band, which includes Sam Doyle from ‘The Maccabees’ on drums, Faris Badwan from ‘The Horrors’ on trumpet; and Sam Becker from ‘Wunderground’ on bass.  

Zeffira commented: “Simon sent me the script for ‘Once Upon A Time In London’ which referenced music from the 1940s. He mentioned a few songs from that era, nostalgia ones like ‘I’ll be Seeing You’ and a few songs by Kurt Weill. When I was around 16 I used to love those songs, and I remembered that I’d written a few in a similar style at the time, that could possibly be useful now. I tracked down a couple of the rough recordings and sent them to Simon, and he thought they’d be right for the film.

She added “Our original choice for trumpet player, Chris Cotter, couldn’t make it, so I asked Faris if he could step in. Faris is 6 foot 6, has quite a distinct look which definitely isn’t 1940s, and he doesn’t play trumpet. Until being on set, I’ve only ever seen Faris look like he’s the singer from The Horrors…so it’s testament to the talent of the hair and costume designers that they actually managed to make him look like a 40’s jazz musician”.

Director and co-writer Simon Rumley said: “Having been a fan of The Horrors for a while I was excited to check out Cat’s Eyes. I went to their seminal gig at the Scala and have been a fan of Rachel and her music ever since. We were hoping to collaborate on a previous film of mine which didn’t happen so when ‘Once Upon A Time In London’ came along, Rachel was the only person I thought of to sing in the Modernaires Club”.

ONCE UPON A TIME IN LONDON dramatises the violent reign of two of London’s most notorious gangsters, Billy Hill (Leo Gregory) and Jack ‘Spot’ Comer (Terry Stone). Charting the legendary rise and fall of a nationwide criminal empire that lasted until the mid-fifties, this is the brutal story of post-war organised crime which paved the way for the notorious Kray Twins and The Richardsons. Described as ‘Peaky Blinders meets Legend’, the film also stars Geoff Bell, Jamie Foreman, Doug Allen, Andy Beckwith, Roland Manookian, Justin Salinger, Holly Earl, Dominic Keating, Kate Braithwaite, Nadia Forde, JJ Hambeltt, Simon Munnery and boxers Frank Buglioni, Steve Collins and Joe Egan.  

ONCE UPON A TIME IN LONDON is a Gateway Films & Ratio Film Presentation, directed by Simon Rumley, written by Will Gilbey, Simon Rumley & Terry Stone and produced by Terry Stone & Richard Turner.

Playlists for the Signs

Capricorn:

1. Take me to Church - Hozier

2. Wires - The Neighbourhood

3. Lonely Lonely - Feist

4. Where I Live - Woodkid

5. Modern World - Wolf Parade

6. Still Life - The Horrors

7. Bonfires - Blue Foundation

8. Worship - Ane Brun, Jose Gonzalez

9. Talking About Money - Wye Oak

10. Obedear - Purity Ring

11. Twice - Little Dragon