the history of rock 'n' roll

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On this day in music history: April 26, 1983 - “Weird Al Yankovic”, the debut album by “Weird Al” Yankovic is released. Produced by “Weird Al” Yankovic and Rick Derringer, it is recorded at The Men’s Room at Cal Poly in San Luis Obispo, CA , KMET-FM in Los Angeles, and Cherokee Studios in Hollywood, CA from Mid 1979, 1980 - 81, and Early 1982. After releasing several stand alone singles both independently and for record labels such as Capitol and TK Records, “Weird Al” Yankovic is signed to the Scotti Brothers label Rock ‘N Roll Records (then distributed by CBS Records’ Epic subsidiary) in 1982. The first album by the comedy parody artist includes his first two singles “My Bologna” (re-recorded version appears on the album) and “Another One Rides The Bus” as well as parodies of songs by Toni Basil, Joan Jett and Tom Petty. “Weird Al Yankovic” peaks at number one hundred thirty nine on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

Russell Brand discusses Iggy Azalea and the appropriation of black culture (watch the full interview from October 2014 here)

  • “Hasn’t that always been the way with mainstream culture? Whether it’s the blues or rock n’ roll [or hip hop]. The re-appropriation of black culture into the mainstream? That’s always been the way. It becomes sanitized. It loses its original message without ever conceding any rights to non-white people. Take the best bits. Keep the fruit. And abandon the people.”
  • “The idea that black culture is constantly being ransacked is a powerful narrative, a powerful story that began with slavery, one of the great abominations of human history. That injury hasn’t been healed. The civil rights struggle is only 50 years ago and still racism is a prevalent issue in this country and all over the world.”
  • Pete: Hi
  • Brendon: it was the summer of 2001, and Joe meets Patrick and he's like "yo, I know about music." then Patrick's like "yo I know more about music!" "that's impossible. so you wanna start a band?" and Patrick's like, "yeah that's cool." and then, he's like "yo this is a book store not a music store." and then they met at Patrick's house. so Patrick's wearing shorts, socks, and a hat. Patrick is playing drums for some fuckin' reason and then Pete's there for some reason. and they start playing music together and they're like "oh, let's play some covers from some other bands." it was like Green Day, and fuckin' Misfits, and fuckin' Ramones. Pete said to Joe, "yo, that's dope, but we need a fuckin' drummer." because Patrick's playing drums and he's a singer. Patrick's like "yo, I got a soul voice," and they're like "wait how do you have a soul voice?" and he's like "yo, watch this: YEEEEEEeeeeeeEEEEEEeeeeeeeeEEEeeeeeeAAAAAAAAaaaaAAaahhh!" and they're like, "oh my god, that sounds like soul!" so they put it in a song, and it was like, "WHERE IS YOUR BOY TONIIIIIIIiiiiiIIIIIIIIIiiiIIIIIIIGHT?!" and they're like "yo that's fuckin perfect, this is Fall Out Boy." and they made records like Evening Out With Your Ex-Girlfriend. Evening Out With Your Ex-Girlfriend, everybody loves it. "it's called Evening Out With Your Girlfriend." with your ex-girlfriend. it's called evening out with your Ex-girlfriend. it's called eating out your girlfriend, and it's real and it doesn't matter. and Pete talked to Patrick and Joe and he's like "you what the fuuuuuuuuuuuuuck. yo, this is gonna be fuckin' doooooooooope!" so they made a record and it was called Take this to Your Grave. they made it without a drummer, and they had like 3—4 drummers come in. The four drummers they had come in were like Josh Freese, Neil Pert, the dude from Toto, the fourth one was like the guy from Papa Roach or something, and they're like "you, we need Andy Hurley. Andy Hurley. Take This to Your Grave. Fuckin' record it." and he did, and he killed it, and he was like "bigidalililililillillilila, PSHHH!" killin' the skin, tapping the skins, tapping the rim, playin' the shit, killing these bitches, rapping it out. you're getting a fucking tattoo right now?! what the fuck is going on?! We should get signed to Fueled By Ramen, 'cause thee guys know what the fuck is going on. and they were like "yo, if you can make our scene any bigger than it is, which is not fuckin' hard, we will sign you guys." and Pete was like "yo, we got this record that's fuckin' dooooooope, dude, it's called Take This to Your Grave, it's called From Under the Cork Tree it's gonna be fucking huge." and then Patrick's like "I gotta keep it real, I gotta keep it artistic, these are three songs that are gonna make the album and it's called-BURP-Thnks Fr th Mmrs, 20 Dollar Nose Bleed, and Sugar, Were Goin' Down. and they made this record that was fuckin' dope, and it fucking hit on the charts like one two three, three two one, three four five six seven eight nine ten. ten to one. From Under the Cork Tree sold like four million records. ten million records. fifteen million records. and Brendon Urie had nothing to do with the entire record. and Patrick was like "that's gooooOOOOoooooOOOOOOOOd." Pete was like, "yo, fuck you I can do whatever I want." and Joe was like, "yeah it's cool man whatever I don't give a shit." and then Andy was like "eh, cool." and Pete was like "Make up is fuckin' great for a guy. because it makes a guy look beautiful, which a lot of times, a guy is not beautiful. and I wanna change that. I wanna make sure everyone thinks that guys are beautiful." I'm good so far yeah. yeah I do. SHUT THE FUCK. oh fuck, alright alright. Pete was like "oh my god, I'm so embarrassed about this dick pic." and then I saw the dick pic and was like "ah it's not bad." it's not a bad dick. let's be real. we made Rollins Stones one issue before Fall Out Boy. and Fall Out Boy made the issue right after us and they were so pissed they were like "yo, fuck you guys!" they're like "yo! Panic! has the fuckin' cover for Rolling Stones, yo, fuck these dudes, we're gonna fucking go miles above. we're gonna hit every fuckin' continent there is known to man." but they didn't because they missed a second of time. apparently they were like "oh shit, we got every continent." and they didn't actually hit it. dude, and Pete was like, "WHAT THE FUCK?! 'oh you didn't fuckin' make the continent' it's like FUCK YOU!" so From Under the Cork Tree happens, we fuckin' have three-four years of awesomeness. like, people are coming in themselves 'cause it's so big. Alright so Fall Out Boy was like-- so Patrick's like "yo, we are going to name these records from under the Cork tree and from Innity-- from infinity on high." Pete was like "yo folie à deux means the theatric of two." "The madness of two." oh sorry I'm sorry. follow boy was like "yo we got to take a break." Meaning Pete was like "yo we got to take a break bro." and Patrick's like "I need time for my music. UHUhUhUHuhUUUh." and joes like "yo I need time to find the fucking art dude I got to find some fucking me-- metal" and andys like "i'm just gonna play with some fucking metal bands." and they're like "all right this breaks been like three years long two years long three years long 3 1/2? we gotta fucking come back man we gotta come back strong." you took my beer away what the fuck? "no you poured it all over yourself." "yeah you poured it on yourself man here." "we got to make this shit legit it's gonna be fucking dope it's going to go fucking sky high. we're going to make a fucking record that sails the skies. we're going to call this record save rock 'n' roll." so they made alone together light 'em up alone together Phoenix. and everybody's like "what the fuck? you're working with this guy who fuckin' recorded Avril Lavigne and P!nk." is this pu-- what the fuck is this on my shirt, did I puke on myself? oh god. Pete was like "yo were gonna end up on a tour with Panic! At The Disco and twenty pilots. and that's all and that's all that matters. and that's just how the fuckin' story goes."
THE SIGNS AS ERAS IN HISTORY!
  • Aries: 2000s: Biggest Musical Revolutionary Era, Terrorism, Piggy-Backed off 90s, Digital Rise, Tons of Music Genres, Films.
  • Taurus: 1930s: Great Depression, More War, Strength prevails, Radio, Cinema, Swing Music.
  • Gemini: 1900s: Victorian Era, Business-was-minded-around-the-world, Migration, Class, Settlement.
  • Cancer: 1910s: Upmost class, Elegance, War, Science prevails.
  • Leo: 1960s: Hippies, Scandals, World Peace, Rich in Culture, Music Dominance, Racism.
  • Virgo: 1970s: Disco, Video Games and Computers, Equality is strived for, Technology-Rich.
  • Libra: 1920s: Roaring Twenties, Jazz, Woman's Voting Rights, Flappers.
  • Scorpio: 1950s: Rock n' Roll, Elvis Presley, New Fashion Look, Golden Age of Television.
  • Sagittarius: 2010s: Unfinished, Memes, Sarcasm, World Race/Equality Conflict rises, Will end bad, Technology-based.
  • Capricorn: 1940s: War Ends, Patriotic, Nuclear Weapons, Space Exploration.
  • Aquarius: 1990s: '90s Kids', Classics, Vintage, Neon Colors, Titanic Film, Revolutionary Era.
  • Pisces: 1980s: MTV, Michael Jackson, Comedy and Cartoons, Mullet/Mohawks, Nuclear Treats.
Meanwhile in Mexico

Rock n’ Roll, the musical style and movement that birthed modern music. Born in the USA in the early 1950s with roots in African Music, Blues and Gospel, and destined to forever change the way we listen to music. Rock n Roll arrived like a storm changing everything on its path, the music of youth and rebellion, with icons like Chuck Berry, Elvis Presley and Buddy Holly amongst others. It inspired an entire generation to create their own music and to evolve the genre into endless possibilities forever changing the way we create and listen to music… But what about other countries? Ever wondered how has Rock n’ Roll affected different places on earth?

Since its beginnings, Rock n Roll has never been popular with authority, and in Mexico it was no different. Rock n Roll has always been an expression of freedom and rebellion which to the government was nothing more than an all-out assault on tradition and morality, a violation of the ideological foundations of a country that has always been highly catholic with little to no separation between church and state. Rock n Roll was an explosion of youth expression a very strong contrast with the generations that came before that moment, and with it came new fashion, miniskirts and tight jeans, colorful shirts and long hair…it was definitely not something the government of Mexico was prepared to allow and it soon begun to link this new movement to immorality, depravity and even satanism.

Rock n Roll became public enemy number one and since the government owned and controlled all media, the president at the time Miguel Aleman Valdez and the Regent Uruchurtu launched a nationwide campaign to eradicate this new movement of Rock n Roll that was a danger to society. Places called “Cafe Cantante” which were dedicated to playing Rock and Roll became illegal and closed down. Most shops and restaurants adopted policies that would not allow long hair or immoral clothes in their premises…imagine the town of Footloose but as an entire country.

For the next decade, Mexico was under authoritarian rule. Young people were expected to submit and obey without question, any expression of rebellion as small as it was could be seen as a threat to the state and would be silenced, this included freedom of speech and any dispute against the ruling powers. The government begun to forbid gatherings of young people justifying this act as a threat to national security.

In 1971 during the boom of psychedelic rock in USA and England, Mexico was still behind, with two decades of prohibition of Rock n Roll the youth was restless. Two young impresarios decided to organize a car race in the town of Avandaro and figured it would be a nice moment to promote some healthy concert featuring Rock n Roll. Well the word spread like fire through Mexico about this event. A nation thirsty for Rock n Roll couldn’t care less about car races but they traveled long and wide to attend this Rock festival that would later be known as Mexican Woodstock. An estimate of 500,000 people showed up to the festival…the music starts and people loose it. Decades of oppression go up in smoke in a couple songs, people dance and have the times of their lives…some sets into the concert and people start chanting “tenemos el poder” (we’ve got the power) The government was not cool with that.

When the festival ended, the government took to the media again to satanize the festival, all headlines read SEX, DRUGS, RIOTS, FRENZY, WILDNESS! And from that moment the Rock prohibition comes back stronger than the first time around. Radio and Television were forbidden to broadcast the music, it became illegal to listen to Rock n Roll or dress like a Rocker, police were allowed to detain, arrest and eventually brutalize any “rockers” they found on the streets, being a rocker was outlawed and you could go to jail…or worse. It was a complete blackout for Rock n Roll in the entire country.

But like anytime anything becomes illegal…it will find a way to thrive, and in Mexico that came in the way of “Hoyos Fonqui” (Funky Holes) Illegal places where people would gather to play and listen to Rock. These places were often somebody’s garage or an abandoned house, some construction site, a warehouse or literally any damn place where you could hide from authority to get your music on. Unlawful places where anyone could go and some even profited from this by selling beer in plastic bags or any substance you could think of. Oftentimes even bent cops would assist these concerts selling whatever they had confiscated earlier or charging for the concert as if they owned the place. Every once and then the real police would raid these places arresting hundreds of people at once.

It took 15 years for Rock n Roll to become accepted into Mexican society. In 1986 a publicity campaign called “Rock en tu Idioma” (Rock in your language) begun to promote Rock and Roll in Mexico for the first time. A great number of Mexican rock bands begun to surge…only thirty years after the rest of the world had lived through this movement.

To date there is a delay in modern musical styles in Mexico as several stages and sub-genres of Rock never had the time to thrive in the country where the music was prohibited for so long.

Schlimazelbabe

Me as a parent
  • kid: mom tell me a story
  • me: it was the summer of 2001, and Joe meets Patrick and he's like "yo, I know about music." then Patrick's like "yo I know more about music!" "that's impossible. so you wanna start a band?" and Patrick's like, "yeah that's cool." and then, he's like "yo this is a book store not a music store." and then they met at Patrick's house. so Patrick's wearing shorts, socks, and a hat. Patrick is playing drums for some fuckin' reason and then Pete's there for some reason. and they start playing music together and they're like "oh, let's play some covers from some other bands." it was like Green Day, and fuckin' Misfits, and fuckin' Ramones. Pete said to Joe, "yo, that's dope, but we need a fuckin' drummer." because Patrick's playing drums and he's a singer. Patrick's like "yo, I got a soul voice," and they're like "wait how do you have a soul voice?" and he's like "yo, watch this: YEEEEEEeeeeeeEEEEEEeeeeeeeeEEEeeeeeeAAAAAAAAaaaaAAaahhh!" and they're like, "oh my god, that sounds like soul!" so they put it in a song, and it was like, "WHERE IS YOUR BOY TONIIIIIIIiiiiiIIIIIIIIIiiiIIIIIIIGHT?!" and they're like "yo that's fuckin perfect, this is Fall Out Boy." and they made records like Evening Out With Your Ex-Girlfriend. Evening Out With Your Ex-Girlfriend, everybody loves it. "it's called Evening Out With Your Girlfriend." with your ex-girlfriend. it's called evening out with your Ex-girlfriend. it's called eating out your girlfriend, and it's real and it doesn't matter. and Pete talked to Patrick and Joe and he's like "you what the fuuuuuuuuuuuuuck. yo, this is gonna be fuckin' doooooooooope!" so they made a record and it was called Take this to Your Grave. they made it without a drummer, and they had like 3—4 drummers come in. The four drummers they had come in were like Josh Freese, Neil Pert, the dude from Toto, the fourth one was like the guy from Papa Roach or something, and they're like "you, we need Andy Hurley. Andy Hurley. Take This to Your Grave. Fuckin' record it." and he did, and he killed it, and he was like "bigidalililililillillilila, PSHHH!" killin' the skin, tapping the skins, tapping the rim, playin' the shit, killing these bitches, rapping it out. you're getting a fucking tattoo right now?! what the fuck is going on?! We should get signed to Fueled By Ramen, 'cause thee guys know what the fuck is going on. and they were like "yo, if you can make our scene any bigger than it is, which is not fuckin' hard, we will sign you guys." and Pete was like "yo, we got this record that's fuckin' dooooooope, dude, it's called Take This to Your Grave, it's called From Under the Cork Tree it's gonna be fucking huge." and then Patrick's like "I gotta keep it real, I gotta keep it artistic, these are three songs that are gonna make the album and it's called-BURP-Thnks Fr th Mmrs, 20 Dollar Nose Bleed, and Sugar, Were Goin' Down. and they made this record that was fuckin' dope, and it fucking hit on the charts like one two three, three two one, three four five six seven eight nine ten. ten to one. From Under the Cork Tree sold like four million records. ten million records. fifteen million records. and Brendon Urie had nothing to do with the entire record. and Patrick was like "that's gooooOOOOoooooOOOOOOOOd." Pete was like, "yo, fuck you I can do whatever I want." and Joe was like, "yeah it's cool man whatever I don't give a shit." and then Andy was like "eh, cool." and Pete was like "Make up is fuckin' great for a guy. because it makes a guy look beautiful, which a lot of times, a guy is not beautiful. and I wanna change that. I wanna make sure everyone thinks that guys are beautiful." I'm good so far yeah. yeah I do. SHUT THE FUCK. oh fuck, alright alright. Pete was like "oh my god, I'm so embarrassed about this dick pic." and then I saw the dick pic and was like "ah it's not bad." it's not a bad dick. let's be real. we made Rollins Stones one issue before Fall Out Boy. and Fall Out Boy made the issue right after us and they were so pissed they were like "yo, fuck you guys!" they're like "yo! Panic! has the fuckin' cover for Rolling Stones, yo, fuck these dudes, we're gonna fucking go miles above. we're gonna hit every fuckin' continent there is known to man." but they didn't because they missed a second of time. apparently they were like "oh shit, we got every continent." and they didn't actually hit it. dude, and Pete was like, "WHAT THE FUCK?! 'oh you didn't fuckin' make the continent' it's like FUCK YOU!" so From Under the Cork Tree happens, we fuckin' have three-four years of awesomeness. like, people are coming in themselves 'cause it's so big. Alright so Fall Out Boy was like-- so Patrick's like "yo, we are going to name these records from under the Cork tree and from Innity-- from infinity on high." Pete was like "yo folie à deux means the theatric of two." "The madness of two." oh sorry I'm sorry. follow boy was like "yo we got to take a break." Meaning Pete was like "yo we got to take a break bro." and Patrick's like "I need time for my music. UHUhUhUHuhUUUh." and joes like "yo I need time to find the fucking art dude I got to find some fucking me-- metal" and andys like "i'm just gonna play with some fucking metal bands." and they're like "all right this breaks been like three years long two years long three years long 3 1/2? we gotta fucking come back man we gotta come back strong." you took my beer away what the fuck? "no you poured it all over yourself." "yeah you poured it on yourself man here." "we got to make this shit legit it's gonna be fucking dope it's going to go fucking sky high. we're going to make a fucking record that sails the skies. we're going to call this record save rock 'n' roll." so they made alone together light 'em up alone together Phoenix. and everybody's like "what the fuck? you're working with this guy who fuckin' recorded Avril Lavigne and P!nk." is this pu-- what the fuck is this on my shirt, did I puke on myself? oh god. Pete was like "yo were gonna end up on a tour with Panic! At The Disco and twenty pilots. and that's all and that's all that matters. and that's just how the fuckin' story goes."
Women's HERstory Month

In honor of woman’s history month I’d like to take a moment to thank the women who came before me, the women standing beside me and the women who will carry the torch of our future.

I’ve been in Halestorm for nearly 20 years. If it wasn’t for our “Fore Mothers of Rock n Roll” who came before me, I may not be where I am today. They showed me that it was possible, and that even with all the odds against you, and obstacles in your way… you can achieve your dream. They did not give in, they did not quit, they did not wither. They were a powerful force in inspiring and encouraging me to go after My dream.

It’s a reminder, ladies, of how important it is for us to encourage one another. We must be examples, and show our fellow femmes that society’s definition of a “woman” is false. To be a Woman is not One idea of what a woman should be. We are the sum of many women who were brave enough to take risks, carve paths, stand out and be unapologetically themselves. All the great women of history were not the ones who followed the rules, or kept their eyes to the ground. No, all the great women thinkers, inventers, artists and leaders were the woman who broke from the chain, and swam against the current.

As girls we are taught from an early age that beauty is our number one priority. We play with dolls we will never look like, we have make up kits and sticker earrings, glitter and pink. We wear dresses, are told not to get dirty, to be perfect, to be seen and not heard. We learn that “pretty” equals acceptance and love.

We are taught as young ladies that the world is a scary place, and that we should get married and settle down lest we die alone. And be sure to have a few kids before it’s too late and your ticking time bomb of a body blows up! And we need products! Products to grow our hair, soften our face, melt the fat, plump our lips, grow our tits, erase scars and stretch marks, make our asses bigger or smaller… because without all these things we are undesirable and therefore not worthy of love.

As we begin to grow, ask questions, and find ourselves as women, everything that makes us happy is somehow wrong…
They say, Be independent, but know your place. Make money, but not too much. Be smart, but not too smart, be strong but not too strong or you’ll be a bitch. If you like sex, you’re a slut, if you drink you’re a lush, if you cut your hair your a dyke, if you like rock n roll and metal obviously you’re on a path to hell. We are told that to be women we need to be the Un-be-able, and because societies view of women is such an unattainable goal… inevitably every women loses.

Before I go on, I must be clear that This post is not about a double standard. This is Not about boys vs girls. Because our boys are taught some pretty warped things too about what it means to be a “man”. This post is about the the history of women, battling social “standards” and the evolution of women as we move forward.

I stand on my meager platform, as a women I have fought to proudly do what I love everyday, I am living proof that it is possible and I am in a rare position to encourage… and empower.
So, Let’s empower, encourage and teach our girls to be strong, to be smart, to be independent, to ask questions, to be tolerant, to be kind, to be fierce, to love, be passionate and to dream. Show them that their beauty lies within their individuality and doing things that truly make them happy. Lets wear sizes that fit us, not try to fit into sizes that society tells us we should be fitting into. Let’s Get dirty, climb trees, be artists, mechanics, scientists, rockstars and presidents. Let’s stop listening to all the things we are supposed to be and truly start being who we are.
We are Women

Love,
Lzzy

7
WWE Hall of Fame 2017 Inductees 

I did what I did. I did a few things like moonsaults off the tops of cages, but usually I relied on wrestling and technique. A lot of people used to think you had to be really chancy, but I was never like that necessarily. If you know how to structure a match, you don’t always need that stuff. Other guys are starting to understand that, and I haven’t seen this much great talent in a long time. Obviously wrestling is doing something right.” — Kurt Angle 

It was a surprise. I had a message on my phone [from WWE] to call the number back. I think they got ahold of Ricky at the time. When they called, it was just like a suckerpunch. It just knocked us off our feet. It’s an honor for Ricky and me to go into the Hall of Fame.” — Robert Gibson (The Rock ‘n’ Roll Express)

I’m humbled and honored, man. Just to be a part of it. I remember Dusty telling me one time, “You know, D, there’s only two things left in our business that’s still real: your first world title, and the hall of fame.” That’s gonna be emotional for me.” — Diamond Dallas Page

If you looked at all the boxes you would check to make a main event guy that would go down in history as one of the best, Rude checked all the boxes. He was an all-around package. He looked good, he could play the part, he knew what to do. He could take great bumps, feed the babyface when it was time to feed, and he would never run out of gas.” — Ricky Steamboat, on 'Ravishing’ Rick Rude

People think because I do a lot of talking on TV and stuff and that I am an outgoing person, well I am really not, I am kind of a loner. You guys were able to do that for me, and get me back out there, get me on this podcast, and get my name out there. This Hall of Fame thing, I am just honored to be apart of that. I really want to thank the WWE, the WWE Universe, Vince McMahon, Steph, Hunter, all those guys that gave me the opportunity to portray my talents and gave me a break, I just want to thank them all and say I appreciate it.” — Teddy Long

When you are in WWE, you dream of that moment when you get to reflect on your career and the things that you did and you get that wonderful individual honor. It seemed so far off in the distance for me when I was wrestling. I didn’t know when — or if — I’d ever experience that feeling. I certainly didn’t think I’d have that opportunity this early in my life. It’s amazing and very, very humbling.” — Beth Phoenix

anonymous asked:

okay so i asked someone already and they were an asshole about it. since you are a witch mom, maybe you can explain?? why can't we call them spirit animals?

Originally posted by 2009wasagoodyear

This would be the part that the lights would lower and all eyes would be on me as I roll in a white board.  Anyway…

See, darlin’, there is thing and it is called CULTURAL APPROPRIATION.

*The very words echo off the walls of the empty auditorium.*

By definition, cultural appropriation is the adoption or use of the elements of one culture by members of another culture.  Let’s take the United States and use it as an example…

Because people from hundreds of different ethnicities make up the U.S. population, it’s not surprising that at times cultural groups rub off on each other. Americans who grow up in diverse communities may pick up the dialect, customs and religious traditions of the cultural groups that surround them.

Cultural appropriation is an entirely different matter. It has little to do with one’s exposure to and familiarity with different cultures. Instead, cultural appropriation typically involves members of a dominant group exploiting the culture of less privileged groups–often with little understanding of the latter’s history, experience and traditions.

“Borrowing” is a key component of cultural appropriation. In the 1950s, white musicians borrowed the musical stylings of their black counterparts. Because African Americans weren’t widely accepted in U.S. society at that time, record executives chose to have white recording artists replicate the sound of black musicians. This led to musical forms such as rock-n-roll being largely associated with whites in spite of the fact that black musicians were pioneers of the art form. This move also had financial consequences, as many of the black musicians who helped pave the way for rock-n-roll’s success never saw a dime for their contributions to the music.

Onto the more witchy aspects of this…

The term Spirit Animal, as used by young adults today, is a bastardized version of a Native American tradition.  The word’s loss of meaning is damaging to the concept of tradition, especially one as regularly plagiarized and demeaned as the traditions of Native Americans. Religion and belief is something to be taken seriously, and when it’s corrupted by pop culture and turned into something it shouldn’t be, then that’s where the damage starts to set in. 

I am nowhere near qualified enough to go into the importance of the term, and by no means do I want to generalize Native Americans as a singular identity, especially since Spirit Animal is not the same for every tribe. However, I (and many of my other witchy peers, AKA those assholes you speak of) do feel like the inappropriate use of the term is something that should be pointed out more, since most of the time people don’t know how problematic certain language can be.

Alternatives to “spirit animal” could be: personal totem, Patronus (ha!), familiar, and so on and so forth.

And by the way, I do have three personal animal totems I refer to in my craft.  I used to say “spirit animals” when I was younger and I quickly realized how offensive it was because I, a mixture of some very weird Cajun-Creole/Black Irish, am not Native American.

Hope this helps.

TL; dr: If you appropriate other cultures, YOU are the asshole.

The Man And The Mistakes That ‘Invented Rock 'n’ Roll’

Sam Phillips, founder of the label Sun Records, didn’t care much about making flawless recordings. Instead, the man who discovered Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis, Johnny Cash, Howlin’ Wolf, Charlie Rich, Roy Orbison and a host of others rejected perfection in favor of spontaneity and individuality.

“Sam would say, 'I hate that word, perfection. It should be banned from the English language,’” music writer Peter Guralnick tells Fresh Air’s Terry Gross. “He didn’t care about the mistakes; he cared about the feel.”

In his new book, Sam Phillips: The Man Who Invented Rock 'n’ Roll, Guralnick chronicles Phillips’ work at Sun and his lasting impact on the music industry.


Photo: Courtesy of Tom Salva/Little Brown & Co

Black history month day 19: musical pioneer Sister Rosetta Tharpe.

Rosetta was born on March 20, 1915 to a pair of musicians in Arkansas. Her parents were also active in the Church of God in Christ (COGIC). This denomination encouraged musical expression, rhythm and dancing, and female preaching. Rosetta’s mother was a preacher and, at her encouragement, Rosetta began singing and playing the guitar as Little Rosetta Nubin at the age of four and was cited as a musical prodigy. By the age of six, Rosetta became a regular performer in her mother’s traveling evangelical troupe.

Rosetta became well known for her music in an age where prominent black female guitar players were a rarity. At the age of 23 she begin her recording career and became one of the first gospel performers to have the mainstream success. She performed with prominent musicians like cab Calloway and was one of only two gospel singers who was able to send records to the troops overseas during World War II.

Rosetta Tharpe has been referred to as “the godmother of rock ‘n’ roll” and her style of music heavily influenced early rock-and-roll musicians, including Little Richard, Johnny Cash, Chuck Berry, Elvis Presley and Jerry Lee Lewis.

And because I just can’t justify posting this without an actual example of how talented she was, click this link to hear one of her classic songs: https://youtu.be/SR2gR6SZC2M

Hidden Herstory: Sister Rosetta Tharpe, “The Godmother of Rock and Roll”

Photo: Sister Rosetta Tharpe, singer, songwriter, guitarist and recording artist.

On October 31, 1938, aged 23, Rosetta Tharpe recorded for the first time. She recorded “Rock Me,” “That’s All,” “My Man and I” and “The Lonesome Road,” which all became instant hits, establishing Tharpe as an overnight sensation and one of the first commercially successful gospel recording artists. During the 1940s-60s, Tharpe introduced the spiritual passion of her gospel music into the secular world of rock ’n’ roll, inspiring some of its greatest stars, including Chuck Berry, Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis, and Little Richard.

As a guitarist, Tharpe defied gender roles playing an instrument largely considered masculine. Her bold and powerful performances disrupted both sex and racial stereotypes in music—proving to be one of the most influential music artists of the 20th century despite not being a household name.

Watch her electrifying performance of “Didn’t it Rain” in England in 1964!