the history of film

Premiering in 1919, “The Homesteader” is a now-lost silent black-and-white film. It is notable for being the first film directed by an African-American, Oscar Micheaux. It is also believed to be the first feature-length film to be made with African-American actors, by an African-American crew, for a primarily African-American audience.

The film itself is based on a novel by Micheaux of the same name, about a doomed interracial romance at a time when it was illegal in nearly all states for African-Americans and whites to marry. 

i see so much about american lgbtq history and it’s great and all but i wanna see more about lgbtq history in other countries ya feel? our community is worldwide, and every country has a different story. the aids crisis was (and still is) worldwide. different countries progressed at different speeds, some are still progressing. i know most of you are american but non-american lgbtq voices are important too, and non-american lgbtq people need a chance to learn THEIR history, and the people who fought for change in THEIR countries.

A 17-year old Frida Kahlo poses for a family photo wearing a traditional gentleman’s 3-piece suit, 1924

A movie about Viola Davis because her life deserves to be known

The only picture I have of my childhood is the picture of me in kindergarten, I have this expression on my face — it’s not a smile, it’s not a frown. I swear to you, that’s the girl who wakes up in the morning and who looks around her house and her life saying, ‘I cannot believe how God has blessed me.’ “ 

“I would jump in trash bins with maggots looking for food, and I would steal from the corner store because I was hungry, I never had any kids come to my house because my house was a condemned building, it was boarded up, it was infested with rats. I was one of those kids who were poor and knew it.” 

“I was the kind of poor where I knew right away I had less than everyone around me. We had nothing, I cannot believe my life, I just can’t, I’m so blessed. I would jump in trash bins with maggots looking for food, and I would steal from the corner store because I was hungry, I never had any kids come to my house because my house was a condemned building, it was boarded up, it was infested with rats. I was one of those kids who were poor and knew it.”

“It became a motivation as opposed to something else — the thing about poverty is that it starts affecting your mind and your spirit because people don’t see you, I chose from a very young age that I didn’t want that for my life. And it very much has helped me appreciate and value the things that are in my life now because I never had it. A yard, a house, great plumbing, a full refrigerator, things that people take for granted, I don’t.”

I first envisioned myself as an actor after I watched Cicely Tyson in The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman when I was a child.”

“It wasn’t until then that I had a visual manifestation of the target I wanted to hit, It also gave me hope for the future and a different life for myself, she helped me have a very specific drive of how I was going to crawl, walk, run from that environment.”

“I became an artist, and thank God I did, because we are the only profession that celebrates what it means to live a life,” 

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top 10 favorite events or periods in history (in no particular order)

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Here are some cool gals looking mighty dapper! You can click on each photo for names and here’s some info on each fabulous woman:

Lily Elsie: English actress during Edwardian era, famous for being in many musicals and operettas

Josephine Baker: French bisexual actress, singer, and dancer who rose to prominence in the 1920s, refused to perform for segregated audiences, active with the French Resistance during WWII and the Civil Rights movement in the 50s

Dorothy Arzner: American lesbian film director who was the only female director in Hollywood during the 1930s, created the first boom mike for the Clara Bow film “The Wild Party” (1929)

Dorothy Mackaill: British-American actress who was involved in the Ziegfeld Follies, also notable for her silent-film roles

Daphne du Maurier: English bisexual author and playwright, famous for her works like Rebecca and “The Birds”

Frida Kahlo: Mexican bisexual painter, known for the feminist and nationalist themes in her paintings, created 55 self-portraits and once stated “I paint myself because I am so often alone and because I am the subject I know best.”

Hannah Gluckstein, known as “Gluck”: British lesbian artist known for her evocative Modernist paintings, adopted the name “Gluck” because she thought the sex of a painter is irrelevant

Olive Thomas: American silent-film actress, involved in the Ziegfeld Follies, possibly the first “Vargas Girl” after posing for pinup artist Alberto Vargas

Jessie Matthews: English actress, singer, and dancer who rose to prominence in the 1920s and 30s

Katharine Hepburn: American actress who helped to create the “modern woman” image in Classic Hollywood during the 1930s and 40s, wore trousers before it was fashionable for women to do so, won four Academy Awards for Best Actress

Viola Davis will star in and produce a biopic on the life of Harriet Tubman on HBO, the movie is based on the 2004 book, “Bound for the Promised Land Harriet Tubman Portrait: of an American Hero” by historian Kate Clifford Larson.

And Aisha Hinds is playing Harriet Tubman in WGN America’s Underground.

And Cynthia Erivo will play the iconic abolitionist Harriet Tubman in the upcoming Macro/New Balloon biopic, HARRIET.

WE HAVE THREE HARRIET TUBMAN

#BlackHistoryMonth