the headdress

@ white people who think wearing eagle feather headdresses is just a costume and doesn’t offend natives, I was at a powwow yesterday and one of the dancer’s who was a war veteran accidentally dropped an eagle feather while dancing and we had to stop the entire powwow, the head man and some other elders had to stop and pray over the feather before picking it up. The guy who dropped the father gave a speech, while almost in tears, about how sorry he was to have dropped the feather and how it represented the choices he had to make in combat and the lives of people that were taken, and he ended up passing the feather on to another young dancer instead of keeping it because he felt so ashamed. This is how much eagle feathers mean to a lot of our nations, and that’s how important it is to native veterans. Wearing eagle feathers as a costume or without having to go through combat is disgusting and you ARE offending our traditions and values. Stop. You cannot understand the importance of our customs and you do not deserve to wear eagle feathers.

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phichit chulanont wallpapers requested by anon

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Kokoshnik is a traditional Russian headdress worn by women and girls to accompany the sarafan, primarily worn in the northern regions of Russia in the 16th to 19th centuries.

Кокошник -  (от слав. «кокош», обозначавшего курицу и петуха,старинный русский головной убор в виде гребня (опахала, полумесяца или округлого щита) вокруг головы, символ русского традиционного костюма.

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Slavic workshop Treti Pivni (translated as Third Rooster) has recently created an amazing new series of portraits featuring women and children wearing traditional Ukrainian headdresses. It was created to pay homage to their homeland while sharing a message of peace, tenderness, and knowledge of the Ukrainian culture with the world.

Traditionally, these floral headdresses are worn by young, unmarried women as a sign of their “purity” and marital eligibility. In pre-Christian times, they were even thought to protect innocent girls from evil spirits. Currently, after the 2014 Ukrainian Revolution, the headdresses are being worn in daily life to symbolize national pride.