the greatest cinema legend

After five years in the works, Smoke and Mirrors: The Tom Savini Story had its world premiere at the Sitges Film Festival in Spain last month. While we await word on a US release, Terry Wolfinger’s official poster has been released.

Directed by Jason Baker, the documentary profiles famed special effects artist (and occasional actor and filmmaker) Tom Savini, renowned for his work on such films as Friday the 13th, Dawn of the Dead, Day of the Dead, Creepshow, The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2 and Maniac.

In addition to Savini, Smoke and Mirrors also features interviews with the likes of George A. Romero, Alice Cooper, Robert Rodriguez, Danny Trejo, Sid Haig, Doug Bradley, Greg Nicotero, Howard Berger, Bill Cardille and Jerry Only.

Check out the film’s new trailer below.

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Get To Know Me Meme - Actress Audrey Hepburn

Audrey Hepburn (born Audrey Kathleen Ruston; 4 May 1929 – 20 January 1993) was a British actress and humanitarian. Recognised as a film and fashion icon, Hepburn was active during Hollywood’s Golden Age. She was ranked by the American Film Institute as the third greatest female screen legend in the history of American cinema and has been placed in the International Best Dressed List Hall of Fame. She is also regarded by some to be the most naturally beautiful woman of all time.
Born in Ixelles, a district of Brussels, Hepburn spent her childhood between Belgium, England and the Netherlands, including German-occupied Arnhem during the Second World War. In Amsterdam, she studied ballet with Sonia Gaskell before moving to London in 1948 to continue her ballet training with Marie Rambert and perform as a chorus girl in West End musical theatre productions. She spoke several languages including English, French, Dutch, Italian, Spanish, and German.
After appearing in several British films and starring in the 1951 Broadway play Gigi, Hepburn played the lead role in Roman Holiday (1953), for which she was the first actress to win an Academy Award, a Golden Globe and a BAFTA Award for a single performance. The same year, she won a Tony Award for Best Lead Actress in a Play for Ondine. She went on to star in a number of successful films, such as Sabrina (1954), The Nun’s Story (1959), Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1961), Charade (1963), My Fair Lady (1964) and Wait Until Dark (1967), for which she received Academy Award, Golden Globe and BAFTA nominations. Hepburn remains one of few people who have won Academy, Emmy, Grammy, and Tony Awards. She won a record three BAFTA Awards for Best British Actress in a Leading Role.
She appeared in fewer films as her life went on, devoting much of her later life to UNICEF. Although contributing to the organisation since 1954, she worked in some of the most profoundly disadvantaged communities of Africa, South America and Asia between 1988 and 1992. She was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in recognition of her work as a UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador in December 1992. A month later, Hepburn died of appendiceal cancer at her home in Switzerland at the age of 63. [x]

RIP Christopher Lee

Count Dracula, Frankenstein, Sherlock Holmes (also Mycroft Holmes and Sir Henry Baskerville), Francisco Scaramanga, Count Dooku, Saruman Of Many Colours.

RIP to one of the greatest cinema legends.

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Audrey Hepburn (born Audrey Kathleen Ruston; 4 May 1929 – 20 January 1993) was a British actress and humanitarian. Recognised as a film and fashion icon, Hepburn was active during Hollywood’s Golden Age. She was ranked by the American Film Institute as the third greatest female screen legend in the history of American cinema and has been placed in the International Best Dressed List Hall of Fame. She is also regarded by some to be the most naturally beautiful woman of all time.

“Nothing is impossible, the word itself says ‘I’m possible’!” ― Audrey Hepburn

If there’s any doubt as to why Yuen Woo Ping is considered one of the greatest choreographers of all time, this clip should put those doubts to rest.
Granted, he’s choreographed dozens of near-perfect fight scenes, but this one greatly displays how he could come up with amazing fight concepts. He’s not just a master of how people move. He’s a master of conjuring up fight environments and gimmicks.
The idea is a simple: a double sided attacker. But he stages it in such an amazing way. Complete darkness accompanied by the maniacal laugh of the villain.
And the fight is still super dope. The idea of one of the fighters having two ides is executed in a way only Woo Ping could pull off. He really is one of the greatest living kung fu cinema legends, even if he has slowed down a little in his old age.