the gobelin tapestries

▪Tapestry: Portière aux Armes de France.
Artist/Maker: woven under the direction of Etienne-Claude Le Blond (French, about 1700 - 1751)
Pierre-Josse Perrot (French, active 1724 - 1750)
Royal Factory of Furniture to the Crown at the Gobelins Manufactory (French, founded 1662 - present)
Culture: French
Place: Gobelins, France
Date: designed 1727, woven about 1730 - 1740
Medium: Wool and silk; modern cotton lining

Jeune Fille Lisant. Charles-Louis-Lucien Müller (French, 1815-1892). Oil on canvas.

Müller was the pupil of Léon Cogniet, Baron Gros and others in the École des Beaux-Arts. In 1837 he exhibited his first picture, Christmas Morning. From 1850 to 1853 he directed the manufacture of Gobelin tapestries. In 1864 he became a member of the Académie des Beaux-Arts of the Institut de France.

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192 square feet of luxurious wool and silk weaving.

Notice the glow of the chandelier, achieved with lighter threading and great skill. Knights, monkeys, dogs and sheep escape the tapestry into our world.

This detailed hanging depicts the dangerous of bad eating habits and overindulgence. The bearded man is not a wizard, but rather a doctor. 

Woven at Gobelins Tapestry Manufactory; after a painting by Charles Antoine Coypel, painter, 1770 - 1772, French. J. Paul Getty Museum.

A Woman Reading. Charles Louis Lucien Müller (French, 1815-1892). Oil on canvas.

Müller was the pupil of Léon Cogniet, Baron Gros and others in the École des Beaux-Arts. From 1850 to 1853 he directed the manufacture of Gobelin tapestries. In 1864 he became a member of the Académie des Beaux-Arts of the Institut de France, succeeding Jean-Hippolyte Flandrin.

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MADDER RED

Madder is the pink root of a shrub from Turkey. Europeans were obsessed with uncovering the secret recipe to making madder into a rich red-colored dye.

The Turkish secret was adding ox blood and cow or sheep dung to threads that had been steeped in rancid castor oil. Yum. 

Known for more than its complex creation, madder red also helped develop color theory as we know today. More in The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

Sancho’s Entry on the Isle of Barataria (from the Don Quixote series), 1772, Woven at the Gobelins Tapestry Manufactory; after painting by Charles-Antoine Coypel. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Armchair (one of four)

Factory: Tapestry probably woven at Royal Manufactory Beauvais 1664-1789

Date: ca. 1755–65

Culture: British and French, probably Beauvais


This rococo chair is part of a larger set of seat furniture supplied to the third Duke of Ancaster (1714–1778) for Grimsthorpe Castle, Lincolnshire. Executed in the French taste, fashionable in mid-eighteenth century England, the set was originally partly gilt and upholstered with Gobelins tapestry (now in the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam) after designs by the painter François Boucher. The present covers were applied between 1934 and 1958.


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