the fold

ashjest  asked:

Hello! I've noticed the current hot cat of internet is the Scottish fold. They are certainly handsome little things and the ones I've come across seem to be consistently curious and intelligent (&adored by their people, which could of course be a factor). I've been looking into getting a companion for my own hellion. Do you do breed overviews on cats? I'd love to see your thoughts on them. Tax: came for Lucifer, stayed for more excellent anecdotes and you being all around excellent. Thank you ;)

I can talk about certain cat breeds. Cats have not been bred into quite the same variety of forms as dogs have been, but there are a few interesting bits that have been propagated for human amusement.

As usual, please note the disclaimer. These posts are about the breed from a veterinary viewpoint as seen in clinical practice, i.e. the problems we are faced with. It’s not the be-all and end-all of the breed and is not to make a judgement about whether the breed is right for you. If you are asking for an opinion about these animals in a veterinary setting, that is what you will get. It’s not going to be all sunshine and cupcakes, and is not intended as a personal insult against your favorite breed. This is general advice for what is common, often with a scientific consensus but sometimes based on personal experiences, and is not a guarantee of what your animal is going to encounter in their life.

Originally posted by waffles-the-cat

They’re cute ears, right?

The ‘fold’ characteristic of the breed occurs because of a single gene mutation affecting cartilage. The ears are the most obvious external sign, but the mutation also affects cartilage everywhere else in the body, which results in osteochondrodysplasia and multiple painful joint problems.

All Scottish folds will have this to some degree, if they have folded ears. This gene is autosomal dominant, which means that only one copy is required to fold the ears. Cats that are homozygous for this mutation would be expected to have worse symptoms than cats that are heterozygous.

This is such a significant problem, and brings the ethics of breeding these cats with folded ears into question, that registration for the breed was delayed due to negative welfare impacts on the cat. It’s worth noting though that a Scottish fold without the fold mutation is still a Scottish fold, and will have the same personality as one, just minus this one genetic feature/issue.

This breed also has a higher incidence of polycystic kidney disease, where random cysts of fluid occur in the kidneys, leading to early kidney failure, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, a disease of the heart muscle which will result in heart failure, but there are genetic screening tests available for these conditions which should be used in breeding colonies.

I wonder if the general public would accept Scottish Folds without the fold, or whether we are just enamored with those ears and not the rest of the cat.

Please Reblog this if you DO NOT want people to tell you “Blessed Be”

I understand that some people like to tell others ‘Blessed Be’, but please understand and respect that some people just don’t like that phrase and/or what its associated with.
If you see that someone has reblogged this please do not tell them Blessed Be.

instagram

Rainbow Cookies!