the flying deuces

PS. — while I was writing the last page, tear after tear fell on the paper. But I must cheer up — catch — An astonishing number of kisses are flying about — The deuce! — I see a whole crowd of them. Ha! Ha!… I have just caught three — They are delicious… I kiss you millions of times.
—  Mozart in a letter to his future wife Constamze

Maria Constanze Cäcilia Josepha Johanna Aloysia Mozart (née Weber) 
5 January 1762 – 6 March 1842


Courageous and loyal wife, mother, copyist, and singer.

Born in Mannheim the third of four sisters, Constanze was not Mozart’s first love but became his truest, as well as a wonderful friend and caretaker until his death in 1791. Afterward Constanze spent the rest of her life preserving his memory, publishing his music, restoring Mozart’s reputation, and not only repaying his debts, but keeping her family financially prosperous.

Described as “one of the most interesting persons in existence” by her brother-in-law artist Joseph Lange, Constanze indeed led a life worthy of a Hollywood film, as not only a devoted and caring wife and muse to Wolfgang but as a strong, independent, and courageous lady. 

As biographer Jane Glover describes—

“In many ways, she was an ideal wife for a composer. Mozart himself was firmly of that opinion. As he wrote in a careful letter to his father, Leopold: 

‘I must make you better acquainted with the character of my dear Constanze. Her whole beauty consists in two little black eyes and a pretty figure. She likes to be neatly and cleanly dressed, but not smartly; and most things that a woman needs she is able to make for herself; and she dresses her own hair every day. I love her and she loves me with all her heart. Tell me whether I could wish for a better wife.’

The marriage between Mozart and Constanze was unquestionably a success. There were occasional signs of tension between them, as in any union. But reconciliation was always sweet: they adored each other unreservedly and cared for one another tenderly in their respective illnesses.”

To attest to his affection for her, words from a letter from Mozart to Constanze in September 1790:

“I get all excited like a child when I think about being with you again — If people could see into my heart I should almost feel ashamed. Everything is cold to me — ice-cold. — If you were here with me, maybe I would find the courtesies people are showing me more enjoyable, — but as it is, it’s all so empty — adieu — my dear —
I am, Forever,
your Mozart who loves you with his entire soul.

PS. — while I was writing the last page, tear after tear fell on the paper. But I must cheer up — catch — An astonishing number of kisses are flying about — The deuce! — I see a whole crowd of them. Ha! Ha!… I have just caught three — They are delicious… I kiss you millions of times.”