the fiction of relationship

TEXT VERSION: Jump’s Group Chat Crack Fiction

Title: What the f*** is this f***ery?
Pairing/Relationship: n/a
Rating: PG-13
Warnings: implied harsh language
Genre: Jump’s Group Chat Crack
Type: You tell me lol

Other: Crosspost from @hsj-scenarios request

Summary: Ryosuke showing off what his wife made him for lunch in the Jump group chat.

((This is the TEXT version of the post–it only has a few images in it for the purpose of the story–if you’d like to see the simulated chat image post please CLICK HERE to go to the that version!))


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anonymous asked:

I used to think shipping was a girls' thing. You made me change my mind

Good. I don’t see why being a fan of the romantic relationship between two people in a work of fiction should be considered a girl’s thing.

IMAGE VERSION: Jump’s Group Chat Crack Fiction

Title: What the f*** is this f***ery?
Pairing/Relationship: n/a
Rating: PG-13
Warnings: implied harsh language
Genre: Jump’s Group Chat Crack
Type: You tell me lol

Other: Crosspost from @hsj-scenarios request

Summary: Ryosuke showing off what his wife made him for lunch in the Jump group chat.

((post is image heavy–if you can’t view it please CLICK HERE to go to the text version!))

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As a gay woman, I just really wish I could read more stories about women in love with other women. I wish I had grown up being able to go to the bookstore and pick out a book about a girl who falls in love with another girl and it being completely okay. I still need books like that. Fluffy lesbian stories along with heartbreaking ones, ones that are complicated and gut-wrenching and real. I want to open books that I can see myself in, that I can relate to on a different level.

Because honestly, the endless mountain of straight-person fiction isn’t really cutting it for me anymore. 

Supercut

Summary:

Marinette loves her friends and Adrien can’t deal. Post-reveal, pre-relationship.

Also on AO3 and FF.net


Marinette Dupain-Cheng loved with a fierce sort of affection that gently destroyed him.

She wasn’t grand gestures or loud declarations or flashy devotion.

She was thoughtful moments and quiet attention and unwavering loyalty.

It took Adrien an embarrassingly long time to recognize it for what it was.  When everything he knew was detachment and afterthought his compass for affection was nearly non-existent.  He knew Nathalie’s cold comfort and his father’s broken promises and Chloe’s noisy fawning. He knew conditions and strings and if-thens.

He didn’t understand second chances.

Striving. Everyone in his life was striving.

They put their careers, their hopes, their reputation on his shoulders and poked and prodded and pulled until he smiled just right and spoke just so and moved just there.

And he didn’t know any different.

Until he did.

She loved in the little ways.

She loved in passing moments and quiet gestures and thoughtfully in a way that was almost careless.  In a way that was so very Marinette.

Adrien had always been careful, but in the five weeks since he found out the Truth he felt like his shoes were made of glass and every next step could be the one to shatter him.

A problem when every shy smile, confused blush, and rapid fluttering of blue, blue eyes made him feel like dancing, glass be damned.

Marinette was Ladybug.

In removing the mask he had been gifted with the knowledge that his best friend was never really as far away as she seemed.  Ladybug was untouchable.  Marinette was so very, very there.

It somehow made everything more vivid, more terrifying,

just more.

It had been painfully awkward of course. Because of course it was when she was so adamant about keeping their identities a secret.

Fortunately for him, Marinette never was good at telling the restrooms apart.

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ohbvcks  asked:

Derek Hale finding he enjoys bath bombs. Especially if they're what, lavender, I think that are the calming ones? Yeah. After a particularly rough night he goes home and drops one into a hot bath. Bonus points for Stiles' reaction being purely and genuinely in awe.

Derek doesn’t treat himself often. The store had been one of Laura’s favorites, and for the longest time he could never walk past it without the scents of the vanilla and cinnamon making him think of her. She’d enjoyed using the bath bombs a lot, and Derek remembers as a teenager he’d complain all the time about the colorful streaks left in the tub. 

He’s looking in the shop window, and for the first time in a long while, the feeling is different– time has eased the pain and the guilt, and now it’s just the fond memories of his sister. 

Derek pushes the door open, and the bell tinkles merrily. The employees are friendly– perhaps a bit too friendly and knowledgeable, and Derek doesn’t know how he finds himself talking, but talk he does. He doesn’t know what quite he wants, but he likes this scent, and he like relaxing after a long day, and … ends up purchasing an entire bag’s worth of bath bombs, hand creams, and a soap bar shaped like a spaceship for Stiles. 

He gets home and puts dinner in the oven, puts away the laundry, and sits on the couch, wondering what to do next. Stiles won’t be home for awhile; Derek could take this opportunity to work on his next book, but he’s still waiting for feedback from his editor from the last one, and he doesn’t want to switch mindsets on his projects just yet. 

The little brown bag is still sitting invitingly on the table; Derek takes out the tissue-wrapped one for Stiles and puts it in the bedroom, then takes the rest of it to the bathroom. He fills the tub, wondering when the last time he took an actual bath. He must have been a kid. 

The purple-and-pink bath bomb has a touch of glitter in it, and when dropped in the water it starts fizzing immediately, exploding in a cascade of color and gentle lavender scent. Derek undresses and gets in the tub, closing his eyes.

It is calming. The warm water and bubbles are foaming gently around him, and the scent lulls him into a soft peace. 

“There you are,” Stiles says, his voice a little awed. 

Derek opens his eyes. Stiles is standing in the bathroom doorway, still in his deputy uniform, smiling fondly at him. 

“You’re home early,” Derek says.

Stiles walks over to the tub, bending down to kiss Derek on the forehead. “Yeah, I finished everything. Plus, I wanted to see you. Dinner smells amazing, by the way. How was your day? Got yourself some bubble bath, I see.” Stiles dips his fingers in the water, flicking a bubble at Derek.

“I like it.”

“It’s a good look on you,” Stiles says.

“What is?”

“Happy.” 

This makes Derek smile, and he tugs Stiles closer by the shirt, pulling him in for a deep kiss. “You’re getting me all wet,” Stiles says, laughing. 

“Good, now you can join me.”

Stiles laughs and gets undressed, stepping carefully in the tub. It takes some bit of rearranging for them both to fit, but they manage. Derek hums to himself, kissing the back of Stiles’ neck, listening to him talk about his day. He may have never thought he’d get this quiet, soft domesticity, never thought he’d deserve it. But he does. He closes his eyes and lets the sound of Stiles’ voice and the warmth of the bath draw him in, the feeling of safety and comfort and love all around him.

The way she slept in his bed made his heart warm with strange feelings. Her body coiled up like a small nocturnal animal, hands folded neatly on her waist. As he crept closer to gaze at her, she stirred, ever so slightly. Open out her hands, eyes still closed, she said in a dreamy voice:
‘Come, warmth.’
That was the moment he knew this girl was his home.
—  When home is not a place but a person

Lamb, P. F., & Veith, D. L. (1986). Romantic myth, transcendence, and Star Trek zines. Erotic universe: Sexuality and fantastic literature, 235-55.

One of the earliest pieces of research published about fan fiction, Lamb and Veith’s essay is a first crack at answering the foundational question of fan studies: why do straight women read and write about men banging? Lamb and Veith focus their analysis on Kirk/Spock slash. They argue that in fan fiction, rather than being presented as masculine, both characters become androgynous by acquiring both typically masculine and typically feminine characteristics, which often complement each other. By removing gender differences from the equation, fan fiction writers are free to explore relationships which are genuinely equal and unencumbered by power dynamics.


Image description

A table reproduced from Lamb and Veith’s essay outlining the different feminine and masculine characteristics given to Kirk and Spock in K/S fan fiction.

Kirk feminine qualities: Femininely “beautiful”; shorter, physically weaker; emotional; intuitive; sensuous, engages in much physical touching; verbal; evokes powerful emotional responses from others

Spock masculine qualities: Masculinely rugged; taller, more powerful; logical; rational; controlled, physically distant; reticent; keeps others at a distance

Kirk masculine qualities: Sexually ready at all times; is undisputed leader, initiator of action; is the “real” or “norm”, always at home; is fulfilled prior to Spock, only with acceptance of the bond is he firmly united with Spock; Spock complements his “at-homeness”; is sexually promiscuous (Spock assures his fidelity); is usually the seducer

Spock feminine qualities: Sexually controlled (except during his Vulcan mating cycle); needs to be led, follows Kirk into action; is the “alien” or “other”, always the “outsider”; is fulfilled only with Kirk; felt one-sided fidelity to Kirk even before the bond; needs Kirk for full identity; a virgin until marriage, he exhibits absolute monogamy after marriage; is usually seduced, but once unleashed his sexuality is very powerful

Friendship Comes First:  What (Good) Fanfiction Can Teach Us About the Romantic Subplot.

I love all forms of storytelling:  television, books, movies, you name it.  As long as it’s quality, its ripe for the picking.  

It’s so easy for me to become engrossed in the lives and psychologies of fictitious characters, to care for them as though they’re people I really know.  Which, on some metaphysical level, I suppose is true, but that’s a topic for another essay.

However, in the midst of all my possibly Asperger’s-fueled hyper-fixation and nerdery, there’s one inevitable aspect of seemingly every plot to which I will almost always role my eyes and click the fast-forward button:  the goddamned romantic subplot.

So many times have I seen the exact same variation of romantic love between fifty homogeneous couples, and each time, I failed to see the appeal:  in books, the smirking, obnoxious male love interest will woo the object of his desire through flagrant disrespect, the same toned bodies will copulate furiously on my television screens (typically at the exact same moment my parents or small siblings will walk into the room), the same vapid, flirtatious stares and generic dialogue will be exchanged. 

But where’s the basis for it?  Yes, these people are stressed to be attracted to one another to the point of obnoxiousness, but do they even like each other as individuals?  Are they even friends?  Is there any three-dimensionality to their relationship besides sizing each other up and deciding to bump uglies? 

Simply and also sadly, the answer is very rarely.  And so, it seemed to me that romance was not my cup of tea, both in the fictitious world and out of it.  Or so it seemed.  

Because it was then, at approximately seventeen, that I discovered a remarkable phenomenon that would change my life forever:  fanfiction.  

Never before had I been so enraptured in the relationships of fictional characters, and I was baffled as to why.  Yes, I’ve read a tremendous deal of fanfiction that is, in fact, book quality, but as an avid bibliophile, I was perplexed as to why I’d never been so captivated by the romantic endeavors of a published author as I was by the passion-projects of writers not much older than I was.     

After a lot of time, careful consideration, and the illuminating words of some of my fellow bloggers, however, I believe I can finally put words as to why. 


1.  Give your characters a narrative purpose (besides being The Love Interest.) 

Do you ever wonder what inspires Supernatural fans to tirelessly churn out fics about their favorite human-on-angel pairing?  I have, and this is someone who’s a proud proponent of the stuff.  

The sheer magnitude of free literature available, constantly repositing the pair in all manor of situations and walks of life, is absolutely baffling, and undeniably impressive.  Indeed, some of the best works of romantic literature – and yes, I do consider fanfiction to be a form of literature – I have ever come across were starring none other than this specific pairing:  from the infamous Twist and Shout (which I don’t recommend if you ever want to listen to Elvis Presley music, visit a beach, or feel joy ever again) to the charming Have Love, Will Travel (probably my personal favorite), some truly beautiful love stories have blossomed from a pairing that has never even been confirmed onscreen to have romantic connotations.  

Perhaps just as baffling is the other end of the spectrum:  Lisa Braeden.  Lisa, for those unfamiliar, is basically posited as the love of Dean’s life, with whom he lived for a year before being forced to give up his dream of a family life and return to full-time demon busting.  They’ve canonically kissed, had sex, shared a bed, and everything typically associated with an onscreen couple.    

Yet comparatively no fanworks exist about them.  When Lisa does appear in a fic, she is usual Castiel’s rival for Dean’s affections, or simply a hapless bystander. 

Why is this?  Well, a disillusioned observer might point to straight women’s apparent predilection towards fetishizing male homosexuality (I, for the record, am not straight myself;  I’m a proud bisexual who, thus far, has only dated women.)  I’m inclined to retort that this isn’t giving female fans nearly enough credit. 

For starters, remove all context from each relationship and examine them with a critical eye:  on the one hand, you have Castiel, Dean’s angelic savior from forty years in perdition.  Castiel is clearly fascinated with Dean, appearing in his bedroom, somewhat suggestively (advertently or otherwise) inquiring about his dreams, watching him sleep, routinely invading his personal space, and ultimately rebelling against heaven in accordance with Dean’s wishes. 

On the other hand, you have Lisa, a perfectly nice character who’s introduced as “the bendiest weekend of (Dean’s) life” and…well, that’s about it.  She’s later shown as a sort of amalgamation of Dean’s subconscious desire for a mother figure and normal life, but she, as a character, remains somewhat underdeveloped and hollow. 

You can’t expect fans to hold the two relationships to the same caliber and then cry internalized misogyny and fetishization of gay and bisexual men when they don’t.

The fact of the matter is, onscreen “friendships” are typically much more developed, much more three-dimensional, and much more ideal of what a truly epic romantic plot should be.  A character with a clear place in the narrative and three dimensional characterization all their own will almost always be more charismatic than a character who’s introduced as exclusively The Love Interest.  

This is not to say that what makes fanfiction so great is that it sexualizes or romanticizes friendship.  In fact, I’m inclined to believe it’s the other way around.  

Which brings me to my next point…

2.  Make sure your characters are friends.

It’s a romance for the ages.  A love like no other.  They’re soulmates, yin and yang, a match made in the stars.

But do they enjoy each other’s company?  Laugh at each other’s jokes?  Take part in each other’s interests?  Are they even friends?  

The sad fact of the matter is, romance and erotica are, as a whole, starved for values of friendship and camaraderie. 

This is something I realized only after my love of fanfiction took root, when I tried to return to my normal sources of adult entertainment (romance, erotica, and porn) and found them, by comparison, almost bafflingly lacking in warmth and camaraderie.  

What I think makes fanfiction so addictive is the fact that it’s built upon the established relationships of two or more characters (the Onceler and company notwithstanding) who, typically, care for one another as friends and compatriots.  

Look at some of the internet’s favorite pairings:  Dean Winchester and Castiel remain a classic.  Bucky Barnes and Steve Rogers are always crowd-pleasers.  Kara Denvers and Lena Luthor are seeing a rise in popularity.  We all know Sherlock has somewhat fallen from grace, but the union of its two main characters still retains a devoted following.

This is no accident:  despite lacking onscreen confirmation, these characters have proven themselves to care for one another as more than objects of their sexual desire.  They’re friends, with relationships based in loyalty and warmth that are, unfortunately, sorely lacking in typical fictional romances.  

Once you get a taste of this brand of friendship-infused romance, in fanfiction or otherwise, it’s hard to go back.  

This isn’t just limited to quote-unquote “fanon” couples, either:  couples such as Mulder and Scully, Bones and Booth, Yuuri and Victor, and Ladybug and Chat Noir can all attribute their popularity to this strong basis in friendship, camaraderie, and mutual respect.

This is also the leading cause as to why the formerly booming 50 Shades franchise, and other arguably sexist, abusive dynamics, are struggling at the box office.  

Which reminds me… 

3.  Make sure your characters are equals. 

Unless you’re writing a Lolita-esque social commentary, it’s probably your best bet to keep your characters on fairly equal ground. 

I mean this in every sense of the word, too:  I have a difficult time getting invested in a romance when there’s a pretty blatant power imbalance, which oftentimes occurs due to the implicit sexism of the entertainment industry.

Disproportionately young actresses are assigned as love interests to much older men, such as Emma Watson’s twenty-something-year-old character lusting over a man almost twenty years her senior in Irrational Man.  

Physically mediocre or average-looking male characters are frequently pared with stunningly beautiful women who like them because they’re “nice,” fueling the existing mentality of all self-proclaimed “nice guys” who think society owes them a hot girl.

Furthermore, @popculturedetective just released an amazing video explaining the “Born Sexy Yesterday” trope, in which hopelessly naive, beautiful women are seen swooning over their more savvy male lovers.  (Found here:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=2&v=0thpEyEwi80)

I love Splash and the Fifth Element as much as anybody, but both films incorporate all these tropes in ample proportions, and it’s frankly ridiculous. (On the topic of Splash, however, I’m greatly looking forward to a subversion of this trope in its remake, starring Channing Tatum as the titular merman and Julianne Belle as his human love interest.) 

On the other hand, you have fanfiction.  I’ve read numerous essays professing that fanfiction is becoming increasingly popular due to the fact that same-sex relationships tend to be implicitly devoid of these sex-based imbalances, and I’m inclined to agree.  

However, I’ve read others stating that male-male pairings tend to be so popular because male characters are typically more well-developed by writers, making it perfectly understandable that fans would be more invested in a possible romance between two characters of equal multidimensionality (see point 1) than one that is sorrowfully underdeveloped.  I’m inclined to think that this theory is even more on point.   

Because look at some of the successful onscreen relationships I listed prior:  we root for Bones and Booth’s inevitable union the same way we swoon over slowburn fanfiction, delighting in Mulder and Scully’s banter and craving their interaction.  

These are, in my opinion, some examples of straight couples done right, because they’re portrayed as friends (see the previous point), and just as importantly, as equals.  

Last, but certainly not least, the male characters in both pairings are depicted as having nothing but respect for their female compatriots, depending on their intellectual know how and not being ashamed to say so. 

A more contemporary example that gets this wrong?  Well, not to offend any fans of the pairing, but Mon-El and Kara, a la Supergirl.  Mon-El was, at the beginnings of his arc, consistently disrespectful towards Kara, putting her down and insulting her in the very same episodes in which her female compatriot – Lena Luthor – is shown vocally admiring and praising her.  

Mon-El has since improved on his behavior, but the damage is done:  I still have a difficult time seeing him as a likeable character, much less a suitable love interest for my beloved Kara.   


These are just a few recommendations, based on the ways in which my somewhat obsessive love of transformative literature (i.e. good fanfiction) have helped me as a writer and helped me view the implicit problems with mainstream romance with a more discerning and critical eye.

Here, I could provide a counterpoint with the recurring problems I’ve noticed in fanfiction, or I could go into some recomendations for writing explicitly gay and lesbian relationships.  Both of these, however, are topics worthy of another essay.

Disclaimer:  I am assuming that any and all readers are trying for an enjoyable, healthy romantic subplot with equally charismatic, consenting, and likable characters.  Dysfunctionality can be just as interesting from a literary standpoint, but again, this is a topic for another essay.


There will be essays like this published at least once every other week, so be sure to follow my blog and stay tuned for future writing advice and observations! 

Do you remember when we danced in the kitchen waiting for the water to boil? You wanted green tea. I wanted you.
A Long Time Ago

I made a digital painting lampooning the cliche’d “Alien Monster holding Space Babe Pose”.  You know, this one 


Anyways, it proved to be a popular image, and after many “Maybes” and “Almosts” and “What the Hell am I doing?”- the story of Rita Rodriguez the space roller derby champ and her small alien boyfriend Prince Zebulon the 23rd will be told….comic style!   My buddy Rhys took the official writing reigns, which is fine since he knows a thing or two about space adventure and space women’s wrestling.  While I wait for a replacement tablet cord, enjoy a tiny preview 


These are….INCREDIBLY ROUGH LINES but you get the idea. Expect a lot of stuff soon. 

[STICKWITU]

Caution: adult-themed, contained blood, wounds, bruises, sign of violence, and hint of abusive relationship. Please do not open if you can’t stand these things. 

I DO NOT approve any form of abusive relationship in real life, this comic is a fiction, with fictional characters and fictional situations.

Rest under cut! 

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