the fellowship on the ring

Have you ever thought about how in the Fellowship of the Ring...

In the film’s prologue, Galadriel narrates the forging of the Great Rings. But there’s a really cool hidden message in how the shots are set up…

The shots of the elves only show them looking at their rings, nothing else…

The shots of the dwarves only show them looking at their rings, nothing else…


But when we get to the nine rings given to men “who above all else desire power”….the men don’t look at their rings. They look straight into the camera.

 

And while other shots are composed to make you look at the magic rings,  everything in this shot is designed to make sure you look back into the eyes of the man in the center. 

Why?


Because these men are looking at you, the audience: because you are one of them.

It’s a reminder that you are also a member of the race of men, and before you call The Nine weak-willed and evil you must remember that you are just as fallible and could be corrupted by power just as they were…that their flaws are only a dark reflection of your own flaws, and the flaws common to all of mankind


  • Aragorn: I never understood why people cared so much about their dumb hobbits until I got dumb hobbits myself. I've only had Frodo and Sam for a day and a half, but if anything happened to them, I would kill everyone in this room and then myself.

Thranduil: So, whose plan was it to send my son and a bunch of other kids to destroy the One Ring in Mordor?

*silence*

Thranduil: Let me guess, is it the same genius who send a bunch of dwarves and a hobbit to kill a dragon and reclaim a mountain?

Gandalf: …

Thranduil: Or is it the one who couldn’t manage to kick one mortal guy’s ass and led whole world to disaster?

Elrond: …

Thranduil: I guess it’s way too stupid to only one of you to come up with. You must have collaborated.

I wish it need not have happened in my time,’ said Frodo.
‘So do I,’ said Gandalf, 'and so do all who live to see such times. But that is not for them to decide. All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us.’
- J.R.R. Tolkien, The Shadow of the Past, The Fellowship of the Ring

During Boromir’s death scene in the Fellowship of the Ring film, you a hear a choir in the soundtrack. The choir isn’t singing random vowel sounds; they’re actually singing in Elvish.


The English translation of the lyrics? It’s a line from the books: “I do not love the sword for its sharpness, nor the arrow for its swiftness, nor the warrior for his glory. I love only what they defend.”


For bonus hurt points– in the book, those lines were said by his little brother Faramir.