the famous editorial

We artists have noticed something: communication with some of our clients (new and old) has not been very good, of late. While there are still many art directors, creative directors, and business owners who efficiently and effectively communicate with us, there are seemingly just as many who are in need of important tips on how to properly assign work or manage projects. Please note: I do not blame these individuals — not one bit; hiring artists for projects is not usually something you are taught in school, and there is no Communicating with Artists for Dummies book, as far as I know.

Therefore, here is a guideline that will lead to improved communication, fewer revisions, better artwork, and fewer headaches for all involved.

1. Your first email to an artist should not read: “Hey, are you available for a job?”

This kind of email is a waste of everybody’s time, because all of the important information is missing: description of the job, timeline, and budget. In order to reduce the back-and-forth between the individual requesting the creative work, and the artist, simply take a moment to include the important information in the initial email request. For example: “Dear Ms. Granger, we are publishing a story in our magazine about the ongoing conflict between hedgehogs and walruses. We will need a cover, a full page, and two spot illustrations. The deadline for sketches is March 1st, and the final artwork will be due March 8th. Our budget is $3750. Are you available / interested in working with us on this assignment? Please let me know by 5pm today. Thank you.”

With one email, you have now given the artist all of the info needed to decide whether or not to accept the job. As an illustrator, most of the emails I received ten years ago read just like the above. Lately, this has not been the case. I’m not sure what happened, but let’s fix that.

2. Please do not expect artists to read minds.

Details are very important. When sending emails about your job, give as many relevant details as possible to an artist, if the assigned artwork has specific requirements. Artists are great at solving creative problems, but we cannot guess what you are looking for if we are not told up front. For example, if you tell an illustrator to draw “a car on a street,” then the illustrator will assume the make and model of the car are not important. The illustrator will also assume the street can be any kind of street. Therefore, it is not fair to the artist to reject the final art because you expected a vintage Porsche on the Autobahn. Please be sure to communicate all required elements of the art in your earliest correspondence with your artist, and it will be smooth sailing for all.

If you tell an artist you need a mural of a vineyard painted on a wall in your restaurant, do not wait until the artist is half finished with a stunning, 20 foot scene with bright morning light casting cool shadows over the grapevines, to tell them that you need the time of day to be sunset. Not only is this a problem for your timeline, but the artist must be paid for all the changes that need to be made because the communication was not clear from the beginning.

Sometimes, you love the portfolio of a certain artist and you wish to give this person artistic freedom when commissioning a piece of work. Let us not confuse this wish for unbridled creativity with a lack of relevant information. For instance, the recent recipient of the Richard Gangel Art Director Award, SooJin Buzelli, is famous for giving her editorial artists a lot of freedom. But, when she assigns work, she actually has spent a good deal of time figuring out a way to distill a complex article down to its essential message or theme. She then sends this one or two sentence summary to a carefully selected illustrator, providing that individual with a perfect launchpad from which to create a unique visual solution. This is good communication. The artist comes away with enough information to be creative and daring without producing a piece of work that completely misses the mark.

3. Please Don’t Leave Us Hanging

This is just common courtesy. I often get asked if I am available for an illustration and I then respond in the affirmative with some questions about the assignment or the budget or some other detail. Then, no reply ever comes. A week later, I will see another artist blog about completing the very same assignment that was initially emailed to me. While I understand that everybody is very busy, and emails are flying around at the speed of light, I urge you to please remember that it is unprofessional and rude to simply leave an artist hanging. We often will put other things on hold or rework our weekly schedule to accommodate a project that we think is moving forward. A simple email to let us know that you will be working with somebody else, the job is cancelled, you need to consult with a coworker before moving forward, etc. is all we need to move on and stay on top of our other jobs. There is a popular misconception that artists are free spirits, day dreaming on a hillside and waiting for inspiration to strike, checking emails from paint smattered laptops touted around in burlap sacks … or whatever … but hey! Artists who make a living making art are working. They’re working all the time. Keeping an artist in the dark about the status of a project upsets their productivity in a major way. Please don’t do this.

I welcome comments. Please be polite. Thanks.

- Kyle T. Webster

4

REBEL REBEL - model: Lucky Blue Smith - photographer: Sebastian Kim - hair: Didier Malige - grooming: Jodie Boland - producer: Tricia Sherman - set design: Juliet Jernigan - GQ January 2016

  • Louis Vuitton jacket, shirt & pants - Cartier bracelet - Tiffany & Co. watch
  • Prada sweater, denim shirt, t-shirt & pants - Tiffany & co. necklace
  • Dolce & Gabbana three-piece suit, shirt - Tommy Hilfiger coat - Gucci sunglasses - Paul Smith scarf & socks - Cartier bracelet - Berluti shoes
  • Gucci coat, shirt, pants, shoes & belt - Renvi bracelet - J.Crew scarf
Yoongi Scenario: Love Is Not Over.

Request: I had this scenario in my head, where y/n is Yoongi’s Gf, and she recieve this huge job offer (she’s a writer) in another country, and she is not sure if she is going or not, but then she had a really bad fight with yoongi and decide to leave without telling him anything, but Jungkook knows she is leaving so he tells yoongi, and ot7 plan something to bring her back (they go to the airport and start singing Love is not over -full ver-)

Genre: Romance / Drama


You spent at least an hour sitting on your bed with your laptop in front of you, but you weren’t going around internet or writing away like usual, you just stared at the screen without knowing what to do. On the screen you could see an email that had been sitting in your inbox still unanswered, one that in all honesty you weren’t expecting to receive. But yet, it was there, letting you know that opportunities sometimes came in the most random times. 

One of your latest works had been really popular around internet, you didn’t expect for it to get a recommendation to be published by an american editorial, neither did you expect that same famous and renown editorial to offer you a job. The opportunity of publishing your work, working at their editorial, and signing a contract with them meant you could have the opportunity of getting your work done on a whole new level, you would step up from the internet and launch your book, also you would be able to gain experience in the editorial world.

The opportunity was gold, one of your dreams could become true with just an acceptance response, just an email and you would be fulfilling your dream of making it big in New York City as a published author. But to get that dream you would have to renounce another. 

Looking at the picture you had on your bedside table was enough to make your throat tighten, in it you saw Yoongi and you smiling to the camera, he had an arm stretched out taking the picture, the other wrapped around your shoulders while you stood really close to him holding your ice creams; just the thought of leaving your boyfriend made you feel pain, because after all Yoongi was your dream as well.

Keep reading