the falkland war

During the Falklands War, the SS Atlantic Conveyor was carrying six Chinook HC.1s when she took two Exocet missiles to the side and burned. Only one - HC.1 ZA718 “Bravo November” - was in flight at the time, meaning she was the lone survivor – picking up the nickname “The Survivor” as a result. 

Conveyor also went down with her IFF codes and nearly every tool used in maintenance except a pair of pliers and a screwdriver. As the war went on, she got filthier and filthier - parts fell off, her rotors got out of track, she developed a leak of oil in her rear rotor’s gearbox, but she gamely flew on without nearly any form of maintenance. The British forces loved her, giving her the new nickname, “The Shuddering Shithead." 

 One night, Bravo November was commissioned to fly an SAS troop, three artillery pieces, and their ammunition to a hot LZ atop Mount Kent, at night. It was a foolhardy mission and was stretching the already ailing bird to her very limit, but she did her duty. 

On her way home she flew into a snowstorm. While the crew was trying to figure out how to get home, they flew into the sea at 100 knots, due to a faulty altimeter. The impact threw up spray that flooded the engine intakes but Langworthy and his co-pilot managed to get the helicopter back in the air. The fuselage was damaged, an antenna had been lost and the co-pilot’s door had been removed. While the co-pilot door was missing, the crew of Bravo November were unable to navigate or communicate with other forces. Bravo November returned to San Carlos for damage inspection. The impact had caused "little more than dents to the fuselage and damage to the radio systems.” For the rest of the war she flew without a side door, leaving the copilot shivering. 

 At the end of the war she had one last thing to do. 

Flying into Port Stanley at the cessation of hostilities, she landed next to an Argentinean helicopter that had been grounded by an air strike. Her crew took their single screwdriver, unscrewed the Argentine door, and put it on the British helicopter. 

 Allegedly, she still has the Argentine door today. 

 What’s even funnier is that, a decade later, her original door washed up on shore and was discovered by a Falkland Islander.

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April 2nd 1982: Argentina invades the Falkland Islands

On this day in 1982, Argentine forces landed on the Falkland Islands and occupied the area, which marked the beginning of the Falklands War. The war was the product of long tensions over who possessed the islands, with Argentina claiming ownership and Britain seeing the islands as British territory. Argentine forces landed on the islands and fought the British Royal Marines at Government House, leading to British surrender and thus Argentina seizing control of the Falklands. British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher responded by sending a naval task force to attack the Argentinians. The conflict killed 649 Argentinians, 255 Britons and three Falkland Islanders, even though it only lasted 74 days. The war ended with Argentine surrender on 14th June, thus returning the islands to Britain.

The Actual Telafax Message Sent To London After The 1982 Invasion Of The Falkland Islands
  • LON (London): HELLO THERE WHAT ARE ALL THESE RUMOURS WE HEAR THIS IS LON
  • FK (Falklands): WE HAVE LOTS OF NEW FRIENDS
  • LON: WHAT ABOUT INVASION RUMOURS
  • FK: THOSE ARE THE FRIENDS I WAS MEANING
  • LON: THEY HAVE LANDED
  • FK: ABSOLUTELY
  • LON: ARE YOU OPEN FOR TRAFFIC IE NORMAL TELEX SERVICE
  • FK: NO ORDERS ON THAT YET ONE MUST OBEY ORDERS
  • LON: WHOSE ORDERS
  • FK: THE NEW GOVERNORS
  • LON: ARGENTINA
  • FK: YES
  • LON: ARE THE ARGENTINIANS IN CONTROL
  • FK: YES YOU CAN'T ARGUE WITH THOUSANDS OF TROOPS PLUS ENORMOUS NAVY SUPPORT WHEN YOU ARE ONLY 1600 STRONG. STAND BY.
Things in modern history we should’ve learned in school, but didn’t:

Things in modern history we should’ve learned, but didn’t:

  • The Troubles, a series of violent conflicts between the Irish and English over who would control Northern Ireland that lasted about 30 years.
  • The UK’s economic slump in 1980-1 that led to riots
  • Margaret Thatcher’s policies led to unemployment and a housing crisis that persists to this day
  • The Falklands War
  • The Iran-Iraq War
  • Canada’s separation from England in 1982
  • Kwangju Massacre in South Korea following an uprising over military leader Commander General Chun Doo-Hwan declaring martial law and seizing control of the country. An estimated 600 people died.
  • Indira Gandhi’s assassination following Operation Blue Star, which lead to damage to the most sacred Sikh shrine and deaths of innocents
  • The Chechen Wars
  • The Rwandan Genocide
  • The Oka Crisis between Canada and the Mohawk nation in 1990
  • Afghanistan falling under Taliban rule in 1996
  • The LA Riots over the acquittal of four police officers by an all-white jury in the Rodney King police brutality case
  • The Somali Civil War

Feel free to add more.

Fleet Air Arm Harrier FRS.1

During the Falklands War, Sea Harriers shot down 20 enemy aircraft during the conflict with one lost to enemy ground fire. They were also used to launch ground attacks in the same manner as the Harriers operated by the Royal Air Force.
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SMS Scharnhorst and SMS Gneisenau

These sisters fought in the battle of coronel in front the coast of Chile where in company of three Light cruisers they destroyed two British Armored Cruisers. Subsequently the sisters were sunk in the battle of the falkland islands by two British battlecruisers taking with them the life of the vice-admiral Maximilian Von Spee that commanded the battle from his flag ship the SMS Scharnhorst.