the equalizer movie

hollywoodreporter.com
Gal Gadot Got Paid the Same as Henry Cavill in Their Superhero Stand-Alone Debuts
Slow your roll, Twitter Outrage.

Contrary to a story that Wonder Woman’s Gal Gadot made millions less than her DC counterpart Henry Cavill as Superman, the two were paid the same for their debut standalone outings.

That’s according to a source familiar with both negotiations, who told The Hollywood Reporter that Gadot made the same amount upfront if not slightly more on Wonder Woman than Cavill made on 2013’s Man of Steel.

The alleged salary discrepancy story was based on a post from Elle magazine, which cobbled together salary information that had previously appeared in various publications and did not differentiate between upfront salary vs. bonuses and performance escalators.

The story was later updated but caused a stir on the internet as Hollywood’s gender gap on wages has become a popular issue. The Elle story said Gadot was paid $300,000 for Wonder Woman vs. $14 million Cavill received for Man of Steel. The source called the latter figure “ridiculous.”

Warner Bros., the studio behind both movies, declined to comment.

A salary of low- to mid-six figures is standard fare for Hollywood tentpoles, especially for actors with short track records; Gadot had bit parts in movies such as Date Night and Knight and Day before landing a more substantial but still supporting role in the Fast & Furious movies. Chris Hemsworth made $150,000 for his starring debut in 2011’s Thor, for example. Adam Driver was paid in the $500,000 range for his part in Star Wars: The Force Awakens, according to sources. Felicity Jones, who had an Oscar nomination under her belt before landing the lead in Rogue One, was paid more than $1 million for the Star Wars stand-alone.

These salary figures do not take into account box-office bonuses, which hit when certain benchmarks are hit. And actors gets substantial increases when it comes to sequels, even in spite of having option agreements and especially if a movie is as successful as Wonder Woman (the film has earned $574 million worldwide to date). Gadot’s deal will very likely be renegotiated.

Dude on Facebook: Electra and Catwomen say “whats up”

Me: Do they? Green Lantern, Fantastic Four (ALL OF THEM), Batman vs Superman, Suicide Squad, Ghost Rider, Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance, Batman & Robin, Batman Forever, Daredevil, X-Men: Apocalypse, X-Men: The Last Stand, most of the various Spider-Man films, Superman 3, Superman 4, Captain America (1990), X-Men Origins: Wolverine, The Wolverine, Jonah Hex, Hulk, The Green Hornet, GI Joe, GI Joe 2, GI Joe refuses to fucking go away, The Shadow, Blade Trinity, The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, Spawn, The Phantom, RIPD, Judge Dredd, every goddamn Transformers film light them on fire, Iron Man 3, The Spirit, fucking Watchmen I apologize for reminding people that pile of garbage exists, Man of Steel, and more that I’m probably forgetting completely drown them out in a symphony of shit.

Also, it’s Elektra.

Mediocrity is the true metric of equality.

The LEGO Movie was my favorite movie of 2014, but it strikes me that the main character was male, because I feel like in our current culture, he HAD to be. The whole point of Emmett is that he’s the most boring average person in the world. It’s impossible to imagine a female character playing that role, because according to our pop culture, if she’s female she’s already SOMEthing, because she’s not male. The baseline is male. The average person is male.

You can see this all over but it’s weirdly prevalent in children’s entertainment. Why are almost all of the muppets dudes, except for Miss Piggy, who’s a parody of femininity? Why do all of the Despicable Me minions, genderless blobs, have boy names? I love the story (which I read on Wikipedia) that when the director of The Brave Little Toaster cast a woman to play the toaster, one of the guys on the crew was so mad he stormed out of the room. Because he thought the toaster was a man. A TOASTER. The character is a toaster.

I try to think about that when writing new characters— is there anything inherently gendered about what this character is doing? Or is it a toaster?

— 
Bojack Horseman creator Raphael Bob-Waksberg commenting on how weird gendered defaults in entertainment are, and why we should think twice about them.