the eleventh hour the eleventh day of the eleventh month

Armistice Day

Armistice Day is commemorated every year on November 11 to mark the armistice signed between the Allies of World War I and Germany at Compiègne, France, for the cessation of hostilities on the Western Front of World War I, which took effect at eleven o'clock in the morning — the “eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month” of 1918. The date was declared a national holiday in many allied nations, and coincides with Remembrance Day and Veterans Day.

A lovely military man selling poppies stopped me today and asked if he could reposition mine - while doing so he told me that women should wear their poppy on their right side; the red represents the blood of all those who gave their lives, the black represents the mourning of those who didn’t have their loved ones return home, and the green leaf represents the grass and crops growing and future prosperity after the war destroyed so much. The leaf should be positioned at 11 o'clock to represent the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month, the time that World War One formally ended. He was worried that younger generations wouldn’t understand this and his generation wouldn’t be around for much longer to teach them
—  ANZAC (kittykatex)

anonymous asked:

But what length of time in fiction had Taako and Kravitz been dating? It didn't seem like very long so I'm curious.

Well, Taako’s section of the Lunar Interlude that took place between the two arcs probably took place within the week after that arc completed, and we also know how long it’s been between The Eleventh Hour and The Suffering Game.

Griffin: So. Things have been quiet at the Bureau of Balance since the conclusion of your last adventure, uhm, which was probably a couple of months ago, because it is midsummer […]

So I’m guessing Taako and Kravitz have been dating at about the same length of time between The Eleventh Hour and The Suffering Game, give or take a few days.

When I was a boy, and when Dwayne Hoover was a boy, all the people of all the nations which had fought in the First World War were silent during the eleventh minute of the eleventh hour of Armistice Day, which was the eleventh day of the eleventh month.

It was during that minute in nineteen hundred and eighteen, that millions upon millions of human beings stopped butchering one another. I have talked to old men who were on battlefields during that minute. They have told me in one way or another that the sudden silence was the Voice of God. So we still have among us some men who can remember when God spoke clearly to mankind.
—  Kurt Vonnegut,
Breakfast of Champions
(1973)
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November 11th 1918: WW1 armistice

On this day in 1918, Germany signed an armistice agreement with the Allied powers, thus formally ending combat in the First World War; the agreement was signed in a train carriage in France. Fighting in one of the bloodiest conflicts in human history ended at 11am on November 11th, as it marked the eleventh hour in the eleventh month on the eleventh day. Cessation of hostilities meant Allied victory in the war that had raged since 1914, but negotiations continued at the Paris Peace Conference and the war officially ended with the signing of the Treaty of Versailles in June 1919. The Treaty set up a ‘League of Nations’ which was to be a group of countries dedicated to the preservation of global peace. Every year, the Commonwealth nations commemorate the fallen soldiers in Remembrance Day, and hold a two minute silence in their honour. Other nations around the world have similar days of remembrance for the over 10 million soldiers who died in the conflict. We are currently in the centennial years of this terrible conflict, so today’s Remembrance Day is a particularly poignant moment to remember the fallen of the First World War.

Lest we forget

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November 11th marks the day which hostilities on the western front were ceased. It only took effect at the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month, although it was signed a couple of hours before it. 
Today most countries see as a great celebration day, by that time, the central powers, especially Germany, would feel like they were betrayed by their political elites, as the soldiers weren’t ready to give up on the western front. Fact is,  the economic crisis in German territory almost made it go into bankrupcy, and a series of revolutions started popping into german territory, those would last until the end of the 20′s. The german Kaiser, Wilhelm II would go into exile into the Netherlands were he would spend the rest of his life.
In general, I myself would call it a remembrance day. Let us not forget those who fought and fell on the battlefields of The Great War (and all wars), no matter the side they fought for.
Lest we forget.

Pictures: People celebrate all over London on the day the armistice was signed, 11 November 1918.
New York Times’ front page on 11 November 1918.

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NCR: Remembrance Day > November 11

The First World War officially ended on the eleventh hour on the eleventh day on the eleventh month, 1918 - Armistice Day. The act of a Two Minute Silence began on the anniversary of Armistice Day in 1919 by those who did not want to forget the millions killed, injured and affected.

Now generally called Remembrance Day, millions of people stop what they are doing and observe a Two Minute Silence at 11am on 11 November each year in the memory of those who have been affected in all conflicts

This year, I am in the UK for Remembrance Day. There is a heart stopping installation at the Tower of London called Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red. The photos I’ve taken taken simply with an iPhone do little to capture the majestic visual in person.

Created by ceramic artist Paul Cummins, with setting by stage designer Tom Piper, 888,246 ceramic poppies progressively fill the Tower’s famous moat. Each poppy represents a British military fatality during the war.The poppies encircle the iconic landmark, creating not only a spectacular display visible from all around the Tower but also a location for personal reflection. 

Today is as good a day as any to create space from our personal dramas and conflicts and reflect on what so many sacrificed in order for us to have the peace and freedoms we so enjoy and quite often take for granted. I know for me, being in London, it is awe inspiring and humbling to see a poppy for every human who lost his life so future generations could have theirs. ~ Sima

On the eleventh day of the eleventh month at the eleventh hour in 1918 the guns fell silent and the armistice ending the “War to end all wars” began. Sadly, war was not ended and we have experienced many wars since. 

So, this day we remember all those who served.

At 11 am on 11 November 1918 the guns of the Western Front fell silent after more than four years continuous warfare.

The eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month attained a special significance in the post-war years. The moment when hostilities ceased on the Western Front became universally associated with the remembrance of those who had died in the war. This first modern world conflict had brought about the mobilisation of over 70 million people and left between 9 and 13 million dead, perhaps as many as one-third of them with no known grave. The allied nations chose this day and time for the commemoration of their war dead.

We will remember them. Lest we forget

When I was a boy, and when Dwayne Hoover was a boy, all the people of all the nations which had fought in the First World War were silent during the eleventh minute of the eleventh hour of Armistice Day, which was the eleventh day of the eleventh month.

It was during that minute in nineteen hundred and eighteen, that millions upon millions of human beings stopped butchering one another. I have talked to old men who were on battlefields during that minute. They have told me in one way or another that the sudden silence was the Voice of God. So we still have among us some men who can remember when God spoke clearly to mankind.


Armistice Day has become Veterans’ Day. Armistice Day was sacred. Veterans’ Day is not.


So I will throw Veterans’ Day over my shoulder. Armistice Day I will keep. I don’t want to throw away any sacred things

—  Kurt Vonnegut, Breakfast of Champions (1973)