the developing world

TL;DR on the latest round of Wikileaks:

Literally nothing you do is safe from the CIA. There are numerous full-on spyware suites developed by them, mostly for iOS and Windows, but also targeting Android, Linux, OS X, and Solaris. Apps thought to be secure (Telegram with encryption enabled, WhatsApp, Signal) were compromised (EDIT: This is incorrect, although the devices that these were on were compromsied) as well, as were a host of other devices (ie smart TVs).

THIS DOES NOT PERTAIN ONLY TO AMERICANS.

If you live in a Schengen area country, your country likely hosts several CIA backed cyberwar experts. They came in via the US consulate in Frankfurt. If you don’t, you likely do as well, but I can’t find anything without sifting through the files myself.

“I have nothing to hide, why does this matter?”: Because there are now multiple thousand “zero hour”- ie “developers get zero hours to fix”- vulnerabilities floating around that no one had any idea existed. The vulnerabilities themselves weren’t leaked, but it’s the fact that someone knew about these and didn’t say.

EDIT: These look to mostly be older, already used bugs, see this post

I hate to make this kinda clickbait-y thing, but this is honest to God one of the most important leaks in history. Our response to this is pretty much going to be life or death for privacy in the developed world. Be loud about this, be annoying about this, and do not shut up about this. Please reblog this and other posts relating to it.

4

1x12 | 2x20

#Alec Lightwood fell hard and fast #he went from the boy who desperately repressed any kind of feeling #to openly admitting his feelings #and not being able to live without Magnus Bane in his life #what a character development

requested by anonymous

  • Male Scifi and Fantasy writers: Look at this !Strong! female character! She can fight and solve puzzles, and ends up with the sidekick not the hero! Isn't she a great character?
  • Everyone: No, she's one-dimensional and still only exists to please the hero's ego
  • Male scifi and fantasy writers: You're never happy! This is how characters are written! Besides, it's much harder for us to write women because we are men!
  • Terry Pratchett: *creates a female character who is literally the embodyment of a dog, sets her up to be the love interest of Protagonist Hero Man.* *writes her as clever, emotionally tortured, lonely and powerful* *uses her to explore difficulties of bisexuality and masculine dominated workforces*
  • Terry Pratchett: *Creates a pair of old witches, one of whom is a virgin and the other who has slept with lots of men.* *makes them best friends, never dismisses one lifestyle of the other, explains lifestyle choices based on characters history and personality, uses this to develop each character as the books progress*
  • Terry Pratchett: *Writes Sybil Rankin* *makes the powerful rich lady heavy set but beautiful, never plays her by her looks, develops her as she ages, acknowledges the way society views such people and then spits on their attitudes* *does it again with Agnes*
  • Terry Pratchett: *Writes a book about an entire army secretly being women, creates complex female relationships, introduces same sex relationships completely naturally*
  • Terry Pratchett: *takes old joke about female dwarves and uses it to explore gender identity without making it seem forced or unnatural, carefully discusses some of the issues and complextities whilst still making funny and witty observasions and maintaining genuine fantasy tropes*
  • Terry Pratchett: *DOES THIS ALL OVER AND OVER AGAIN, DEVELOPING CHARACTERS AS HIS VEIW OF THE WORLD DEVELOPS AND CAREFULLY APOLOGIZES FOR EARLY MISTAKES*
Developing Characters by Threes

Whenever I create new characters - for writing, for tabletop RPGs, or for video games - I look for character creation tools and charts to help me think through their personality, but the ones I’ve found have either been too long and complicated (”describe your character’s relationship with her paternal grandmother”) or too culture-specific (”does your character believe in God?”). So I made one for myself. It’s meant to be a quick exercise, designed to get down a few important aspects of a character and a few anecdotes to flesh them out. The questions are also very broad - you can interpret them in whatever way you find useful, and they should be interesting to answer whether your character exists in the modern day or in a fantasy world. Since I’m sure I’m not the only one with this issue, I thought I’d share it here. Enjoy - and if you have any questions you think would be neat to add, please comment with them!

List or describe three…

Names (first/middle/last or first/nickname/last):

Positive qualities:

Negative qualities:

Neutral qualities:

Skills:

Things they are bad at:

Favorite things:

Things they dislike:

Hobbies:

Habits:

Quirks:

Beliefs (moral, religious, or personal):

Instincts (beyond those commonly felt - eg. an instinct to protect the weak, or to become passive-aggressive when insulted):

Important moments in their life:

Unimportant moments in their life (funny stories, anecdotes they like to repeat, or small moments demonstrative of their character):

Important relationships in their life (at the beginning of your story):

Things they want or need:

Things about them that changed before your story:

Things about them that change during your story:

Objects they own that are important to them:

“””developing countries””” 

“””third world countries””” 

…you mean countries that are still recovering from colonialism and other western intervention??? let’s not sugar coat the reason why their “development” was hindered and act like they are still in those stages because they are inherently inferior to western countries. the west saw their greatness and they left them in ruin on purpose. referring to these countries as developing or third world is fucking degrading terminology that takes away responsibility from countries like the UK and the US. 

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Developer Update | Hero Balance Updates | Overwatch



6

this chapter gave me so many feels okay

anonymous asked:

I played FFXV after I saw your numerous posts. It's an okay game but Noctis is your typical flat emo character, I don't understand the ruckus for him.

……….What.



Anon-san, are you sure

that we

even play

a same game

Because.. I mean..

just look

at this guy

like

????????


This game have a lot of flaws but I’m certain Noct’s characterization is not part of them. Of course you’re free to like or dislike and entitled to your own opinion, but….flat…… no, anon. Just, no. I have to disagree. Fight me.

Writing Science Fiction: Tips for Beginners

We’ve seen a lot of science fiction stories over the past year or so. It’s not like they sci-fi ever went out of style, but it seems to be gaining popularity recently.

For some, writing science fiction might seem like a daunting genre to break into. Do you need to know complex mathematical equations? Do you need to know exactly how space travel works? Did you need to major in astrophysics?

Sure, those things don’t hurt, but they’re absolutely not necessary. You can write a great sci-fi novel without years of research. And you can tell a really interesting story, even if you’re not a science pro.

Here are a few tips to get started:

Consider ‘What-if’ Scenarios

This isn’t just a great rule for sci-fi novels, but I think the best ones use this approach. Start off with a simple what-if scenario. For example: what if we lived on a world made of ice? What if in this particular world only consisted of women? Obviously, you’ll need to expand on those scenarios and spend time really developing what those caveats would mean, but you get the idea.

Start with a small what-if scenario and brainstorm!

Figure Out Your Rules

I don’t think writing great sci-fi depends on being 100% scientifically accurate ALL THE TIME, but I do think you need to stick to your own rules. Whatever is a hard rule for your own universe, it’s important to keep it that way. Does your world have ships that can travel quickly from planet to planet? Sure, that’s great! Figure out your own rules for space travel and develop your world. How do the inhabitants on one planet act/grow/eat/interact compared to the inhabitants of another? Spend time developing these ideas!

No Info Dumps!

Sometimes when people write science fiction, they tend to explain their universe all in one big info-dump. Don’t. This is boring and it does nothing to serve your story. Slowly reveal information. Every plot point in your story should serve a purpose. Develop your characters through the action and show off your worlds through them. Get creative.

Keep it Vague

If you’re unsure about the science of something, write to your strengths. Don’t understand how space travel works? Maybe your MC is put to sleep during a long trip. This is just one example, but try to figure out a way to make it work for you. Maybe avoid space travel altogether if it doesn’t serve your story.

Listen, this isn’t a substitute for research, but I also don’t want you to avoid writing science fiction if you just don’t get a lot of the concepts involved. If you’ve got a great idea for a story, work it out to fit your style. Science fiction is a great platform for unique and compelling character studies, so don’t get scared off! You don’t have to write hard science fiction in order to write a good novel.

-Kris Noel

ajcaimi  asked:

Hey Dana. I was wondering if you have any plans to develop and pitch a show of your own. If you do, what advice do you have for people who want to create their own show?

I did have plans to pitch a show. And I pitched it! And Disney bought it! And now I’m developing it!  It’s difficult and exciting ESPECIALLY because I’m doing all this for the first time. I hope I can show some images someday!

If I were to give one piece of advice to past me, it’d be to get comfortable writing entertaining scripts. As a showrunner the most important thing will be The Show, and 90% of The Show comes from The Writing. It’s difficult to find writers who will 100% understand your vision but if that’s an area you’re comfortable in you’ll never be an dire straits. I had never professionally written a script before my pilot. If I did maybe that part wouldn’t have been as stressful at the time haha. 

But let’s say you’re already good there. You’re good everywhere! 

How to pitch a thing! I used to love making “pitch books” as a kid, though I had no idea that’s what I was doing. It was just fun to develop worlds and characters! So even if you’re in HS or younger, making “pitch books” is a great way to spend your time and practice for the future. So get to it! Here’s just one format you can try: 

1. Cover page with short description of show and a fun image of your main character!

2. ½-1 full page describing your main character/s! (Don’t start with exhaustive explanations about the world, or any legends, or w/e, we’re here bc we want to connect with a character).

3. A couple pages with any other important characters you may have!

4. A page describing the most important relationships between your main character/s and others!

5. Simple 1 page description on how your world works! If it’s too complicated to get on one page, SIMPLIFY! Even the most complicated ideas can be pitched in 1-2 sentences. 

6. Important places! The main characters house? The bad guy’s castle? Stuff like that. 

7. Give em a couple episode examples! That’s where your show comes together, after all. 

And you’re done!

Fill your pitch book with fun images that show off your characters and your world! You don’t have to follow this format exactly, it’s your show, your pitch, do whatever you think will show off your ideas best. If you’re making an epic you might want to dedicate a page to where you want the show to go, and how the characters will evolve. Everything depends on what you want to make. But above all: Make it interesting to read!!! Make it fun to look at!!! Boredom is your enemy, fight against it!!!!

Are my exclamation points making this easier to understand? GREAT!!!!!

Now get out there and pitch some things cause I want new shows to watch.

10 Things People Don’t Realize You’re Doing Because You’re An iNtuitive

The MBTI inventory classifies iNtuitive types as those who place more interest (and often more value) in theories, abstractions and the exploration of possibilities than they do in the concrete realities of the world around them.

iNtuitive-dominant personality types (mainly ENFPs, ENTPs, INTJs and INFJs) are almost always more interested in what isn’t being said or considered than what is.

But since we live in a sensor-dominant world, intuitive behavior tends to stick out like a sore thumb. Almost every iNtuitive personality will be able to recall many experiences in which their loved ones were thoroughly confused by their reasoning or behavior. Here are ten behaviors people often don’t understand are associated with being an iNtuitive personality.

1. Spurring debates.

iNtuitives don’t fully understand an issue until they’ve considered it from every possible angle. These types aren’t debating because they want to be difficult or impolite – they’re debating because they need to test the validity of the topic by arguing it from every side. They want to see if any holes arise in their reasoning as they go, and some of their best learning takes place through the process of debate.

2. Obsessively planning for the future.

iNtuitives live almost exclusively in the future – they love considering which options may arise for them, which goals they ought to set for themselves, what their lives may look like in twenty or thirty years, etc.

Of course, it’s impossible to plan every detail of one’s life… so the plan is subject to getting readjusted. For extroverted iNtuitives (xNFPs and xNTPs), the readjusting happens almost daily. For introverted intuitives (xNFJs and xNTJs), readjusting happens as needed – but the need tends to arise regularly.

3. Viewing the rules as suggestions.

It’s not that iNtuitives are rebellious for the sake of it – it’s just that they analyze why a rule exists before deciding whether or not to follow it. These types despise arbitrary action, so if they perceive a rule to be outdated or ineffective, they have no problem casting it aside and doing things their way instead.

4. Over-analyzing everything.

For the iNtuitive, it isn’t enough to understand how a given issue applies to them – they have to also understand the global implications of the issue, or the underlying theory that ties is all together. iNtuitives want to know the intangible explanation for every tangible problem, and it can drive those around them a little bonkers.

5. Placing little trust in authority.

iNtuitives types trust competence over qualification, and they want to make their own judgments about how competent they find others to be. iNtuitives are highly aware of the human tendency to favor convenience and prestige above analysis, and they aren’t quick to trust any established system simply because it’s been in place for a long time.

6. Relentlessly seeking variety.

iNtuitive personalities are naturally drawn to the abnormal, the uncouth and the unconventional. These types spend their entire lives attempting to piece together a comprehensive worldview, which means that they seek to understand as many different oddities as possible. Whether they’re seeking novelty in their studies, their lifestyles or both, these types are always on the hunt for new lenses through which they can view the world.

7. Developing obscure interests.

Since what they don’t know is almost always more interesting to the iNtuitive personality than what they do know, these types are likely to take an interest in niche topics or theories. Many iNtuitives enjoy exploring conspiracy theories or other such ‘unfounded’ methods of reasoning, as they enjoy the ‘mental gymnastics’ aspect of linking seemingly unrelated things together (even though they often don’t believe the actual theories themselves at the end of the day).

8. Socializing selectively.

Extroverted iNtuitives (mainly ENFPs and ENTPs) are considered the most introverted of the extroverted types. Introverted iNtuitives (mainly INFJs and INTJs) may be more traditionally introverted in nature, but put any of these types around in a room together and the conversation is likely to flow on for hours (if not days, if not endlessly)!

iNtuitive-dominant types are often quickly exhausted by engaging with their physical environment, but they are endlessly energized by quality conversation. These types tend to consider themselves to be ‘selectively social’ – they’d rather be alone than around people they don’t connect with, but put them around other iNtuitive types and their social side suddenly emerges with fervor.

9. Playing devil’s advocate.

If there’s a sure-fire way to get under an iNtuitive’s skin, it’s to insist that basically any issue is black or white. These types are quick to assume the role of devil’s advocate in any situation where they feel as though the opposing party is forming an opinion without considering the alternative point of view. These types are prone to vehemently arguing points they don’t even agree with, just to prove that an issue is more complex than those around them are assuming it to be.

10. Pursing an unconventional life course.

iNtuitives are naturally drawn to the strange, the provocative and the unconventional. They may be more prone than sensing types to have an entrepreneurial streak, to engage in non-traditional relationship structures or to experiment with lifestyle choices that are outside the societal norm.

Because these types take a ‘why not’ approach to their lives (or in the case of introverted iNtuitives, their research and learning), they often find themselves unintentionally rebelling from the rest of society. It’s not that they want to do everything differently – it’s just that an iNtuitive’s lifestyle tends to reflect their mindset – and the mind of an iNtuitive is a very strange territory indeed.

By Heidi Priebe, via consciousreminder