the democratic republic of congo

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World Map of literature

The Americas

Canada - Anne of Green Gables
U.S.A - To Kill a MockingBird 
Mexico - Pedro Paramo 
Guatemala - Men of Maize 
Belize - Beka Lamb 
Honduras - Cipotes 
El Salvador - Bitter Grounds 
Nicaragua - The Country Under my Skin 
Costa Rica - La Isla de los hombres solos 
Panama - Plenilunio 
Colombia - 100 Years of Solitude 
Venezuela - Dona Barbara 
Guyana - Palace of the Peacock 
Suriname - The Price of Sugar 
French Guiana - Papillon 
Ecuador - The Villager 
Brazil - Dom Casmurro 
Peru - Death in the Andes 
Bolivia - Bronze Race 
Paraguay - I the Supreme 
Argentina - Ficciones 
Chile - The House of the Spirits 
Uruguay - Soccer in the Sun and Shadow 
Cuba - Havana Bay 
Haiti - Breath, Eyes, Memory 
Dominican Republic - Wonderful Life of Oscar Wao 
Bahamas - The Measure of a Man 
Jamaica - A brief history of Seven Killings 
Puerto Rico - When I was Puerto Rican 
Lesser Antilles - Wide Sargasso Sea 
Greenland - Islands, the Universe, Home


Europe & Russia

Norway - Hunger 
Iceland - Jar City 
Sweden - Gosta Berling’s Saga 
Finland - The Unknown Soldier 
Denmark - Feeling for Snow 
Latvia - Nāvas Ena 
Estonia - Truth and Justice 
Lithuania - Black Sheep 
Belarus - Voices from Chernobyl 
Ukraine - Death and the Penguin 
Moldova - A Siberian Education 
Romania - Forest of the Hanged 
Bulgaria - Under the Yoke 
Poland - Pan Tadeusz 
Germany - Buddenbrooks 
Netherlands - The Discovery of Heaven 
Belgium - The Sorrow of Belgium 
Luxembourg - In Reality: Selected Poems 
United Kingdom - Great Expectations 
Ireland - Ulysses 
Czech Republic - The Good Soldier 
Slovakia - Rivers of Babylon 
France - The Count of Monte Cristo 
Spain - Don Quixote 
Portugal - Baltasar and Blimunda 
Austria - The Man Without Qualities 
Switzerland - Heidi 
Italy - The Divine Comedy 
Slovenia - Alamut 
Croatia - Cafe Europa 
Hungary - Eclipse of the Crescent Moon 
Bosnia and Herzegovina - Zlata’s diary 
Serbia - Dictionary of the Khazars 
Montenegro - Montenegro: A Novel 
Albania - The General of the Dead Army 
Macedonia - Freud’s Sister 
Greece - The Iliad 
Russia - War and Peace


Asia and The Middle East

Turkey - My Name is Red 
Georgia - Knight in the Panther’s Skin 
Armenia - The Fool 
Azerbaijan - Blue Angels
Iran - Shahnameh 
Iraq - The Corpses Exhibition and Other Stories 
Syria - The Dark Side of love 
Lebanon - The Hakawati 
Israel - Mornings in Jenin 
Syria - The Dark Side of Love 
Kuwait - A Map of Home 
UAE - The Sand Fish 
Saudi Arabia - Cities of Salt 
Qatar - The Emergence of Qatar 
Yemen - The Hostage 
Oman - The Turtle of Oman 
Kazakhstan - The Book of Words 
Turkmenistan - The Tale of Aypi 
Uzbekistan - Chasing the Sea 
Kyrgyzstan - Jamilia 
Tajikistan - Hurramabad 
Afghanistan - Kite Runner 
Pakistan - The Reluctant Fundamentalist 
Nepal - The Palpasa Cafe 
India - The God of Small Things 
Bhutan - the Circle of Karma 
Bangladesh - A Golden Age 
Myanmar - Smile as they Bow 
Laos - In the Other Side of the Eye 
Thailand - The Four Reigns 
Vietnam - The Sorrows of War 
Cambodia - First they Killed my Family 
Taiwan - Green Island 
Sri Lanka - Anil’s Ghost 
Mongolia - The Blue Sky 
North Korea - The Aquariums of Pyongyang 
South Korea - The Vegetarian 
Japan - Kokoro 
China - The Dream of the Red Chamber 
Malaysia - The Garden of Evening Mists 
Brunei - Some Girls 
Indonesia - This Earth of Mankind 
Philippines - Noli Me Tangere 
East Timor - The Redundancy of Courage


Australiz, New Zealand & The Pacific Islands

Australia - Cloudstreet 
Papua New Guinea - Death of a Muruk 
Vanuatu - Black Stone 
Solomon Islands - Suremada 
Fiji - Tales of the Tikongs 
New Zealand - The bone People


Africas

Algeria - The Stranger
Libya - In the Country of Men
Egypt - Palace Walk
Morocco - The Sand Child
Mauritania - Silent Terror: A Journey into Contemporary African Slavery
Mali - Sundiata: An Epic of Old Mali
Niger - Sarraounia
Chad - The Roots of Heaven
Sudan - Lyrics Alley
Nigeria - Things Fall Apart
Cameroon - The Old Man and the Medal
Central African Republic - Batouala
South Sudan - They Poured Fire on Us from the Sky
Ethiopia - Beneath the Lion’s Gaze
Somalia - The Orchard of Lost Souls
Democratic Republic of the Congo - The Antipeople
Uganda - Abyssinian Chronicles
Kenya - Petals of Blood
Tanzania - Desertion
Angola - A Gloriosa Familia
Zambia - Scribbling the Cat: Travels with an African Soldier
Mozambique - Sleepwalking Land
Zimbabwe - The House of Hunger
Namibia - Born of the Sun
Botswana - The No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency
South Africa - Disgrace

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  • mawuexpeditionsThe Nyiragongo in action.
    Time lapse filmed during this month’s expedition in Congo.
    Now I see why we always spend endless hours haunted by this otherworldly being.
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#Blackout Featured Artist: Sloane Siobhan

The Artist Behind “Lollipop Girl” featured on the #Blackout’s Shorty Awards Page.

Sloane Siobhan is a visual artist specializing in oil painting. Nurturing her talents at the age of 4, she enrolled in MonArt and was trained by Jillian Goldberg and later attended high school at NorthWest School of the Arts to concentrate in visual arts. She graduated from Appalachian State University in December 2016 with a Bachelor of Fine Arts, and painting concentration.

Sloane has worked on various projects including but not limited to client commissions, t-shirt designs & banners for the student run club Black Student Association, and silent auctions for the Heart Association. She was published in the Charlotte Observer in an article showcasing her talents to help spread awareness about the plight of women in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The article highlighted her successful solo exhibition at Providence Gallery in Charlotte, NC in 2010 in which all proceeds from the exhibit went to the foundation, Women for Women.

She was accepted into a year-long group exhibition at Appalachian State’s Chancellor’s House and exhibited her work in the 2016 group summer show, Visual Jungle in Charlotte, NC. She was commissioned by Appalachian State’s chancellor to create a piece for the university, that was also featured in the Bachelor of Fine Arts group exhibition, Calico, in December of 2016.

Sloane currently resides in Charlotte, NC and travels to do shows along the East coast.

Artwork and Bio reposted with permission. Do not remove credits.

molagbalsdeep  asked:

Africa is so beautiful. Where would you recommend to someone who wants to visit for the first time? (Every country looks gorgeous, but which are the most welcoming?)

It depends on what you’re looking for during your visit/ what you’re into. Of course the most popular countries (South Africa, Ghana, Nigeria, Morocco, Kenya & Egypt) attract the most people but I think there are alot of hidden gems in many other countries worth exploring as well. 

Here are a few…

Lake Rebta  (Senegal)


Lake Retba or Lac Rose lies north east of Senegal’s capital Dakar. The water in Senegal’s Lake Retba always seems to have a pinkish hue to it. The lake’s unusual appearance is caused by a salt-loving green micro alga called Dunaliella Salina that resides in the lake, known for its high concentration of the mineral. The color is particularly visible during the dry summer months when the saline levels are high and you will see it turn strawberry pink and sometimes, even red. 


The Devil’s Pool (Zambia)

Devil’s Pool is adjacent to the famous Livingstone Island situated on the edge of the Victoria Falls. Guests can choose to enjoy an exhilarating swim to the edge of the falls during their Livingstone Island visit. The Devil’s Pool is usually open between mid August and mid January - depending on Zambezi water levels.

Marrakech, Morocco 

The city is divided into two distinct parts: the Medina, the historical city, and the new modern district called Gueliz or Ville Nouvelle. The Medina is full of intertwining narrow passageways and local shops full of character. In contrast, Gueliz plays host to modern restaurants, fast food chains and big brand stores.


Virunga Mountains (Rwanda, Congo (DRC) & Uganda)

Nearly half of the world’s 700-some remaining mountain gorillas live in the Virunga Mountains of central Africa, at the intersection of Uganda, Rwanda, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The volcanic slopes here are lush with tropical forests and diverse mammal, bird, and reptile species. Tours are available to see the volcanos and gorillas (but please take note & high consideration…if you’re sick….don’t go on the gorilla tours, for their sake ( they’re endangered), even if it’s a small fever).

Zanzibar (Tanzania)

In Zanzibar to ancient Persia and tales of Shirazi merchants that inspired Sinbad the Sailor, to the court of Swahili princes and Omani sultans, to India, with its heavily laden scents.

For over 2000 years the monsoon winds have shaped the landscape and culture of these islands. Stone Town’s Indo-Arabian architecture provides an amazing urban backdrop. Clove farms creep up the hillsides and farmers load crates of mangoes onto outbound boats. And, along the coast, village life remains steeped in tradition as fishing dhows set sail on high tides and women farm seaweed off powder-white coral sand. With its tropical tableau and unique culture, the archipelago offers the quintessential Indian Ocean experience.

Loango National Park (Gabon)

Many nature lovers well acquainted with the African continent consider Gabon a rare and exotic tropical gem. Wildlife rich forests cover 70% of Gabon’s landmass, its vast picturesque coastline is predominantly wild and unspoiled, and its inland and coastal waters teem with myriad species of fish, reptiles and marine mammals. In Loango National park you can spot various animals from hippos to whales!

Ouidah (Benin)

Some 42km west of Cotonou is Ouidah, a relaxed, relatively prosperous town and a must-see for anyone interested in voodoo or Benin’s history of slavery. From the 17th to the late 19th century, captured countrymen from across West Africa left Ouidah for the Americas.

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Panorama of Nyiragongo Crater, Democratic Republic of the Congo

The Bushongo dignitaries…each carry a ceremonial staff… Once I took up such a staff to inspect it from close up after which I laid it without a second thought upon the ground. The high ranking man who owned the stick smiled at me and said: "if a Bushongo had treated my stick with such carelessness, I would certainly have punished him severely.” “And why don’t you punish me?” I asked. “Certainly I cannot punish a white man for his poor behaviour”, he responded, still smiling, “as a white man cannot possibly understand good manners.
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- A story I read in an exhibition on Hungarian anthropologist Emil Torday, describing the fiercest drag I’ve ever encountered from a leader in Congo

Originally posted by w3eds

“We don’t like pictures like this. It is not good to deduce an entire country to the image of a person reaching out for food. It is not good for people to see us like this, and it is not good for us to see ourselves like this. This gives us no dignity. We don’t want to be shown as a country of people waiting for someone to bring us food. Congo has an incredible amount of farmland. An incredible amount of resources. Yes, we have a lot of problems. But food is not what we are reaching for. We need investment. We need the means to develop ourselves." 

(Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo)