the cornell method

Summer Tips II: How to take notes- The Cornell Method

The Cornell Note taking system has been around for a while, and I think a majority of the studyblr community has heard of it, but I thought I would make you guys a little guide for how exactly this method works. It’s great for taking concise, and easy to study, notes. Hopefully this will help you guys!

40 Study Tips & Tricks

I thought to write down the “script” to one of my most viewed videos, with 40 study tips & tricks. It’s easier to read them and pass on the word!

Organization Tips:

1. Incorporate homework and classes in you daily planner – that will give you an overall glimpse of how your week will be about and how much time you need to spend in your studying sessions!

2. Color coordinate classes – be it notes, your planner, your textbooks or binders, pick a unique color for each class and work around the hues of that color to get more organized!

3. Make your own syllabus – if your professor doesn’t provide a syllabus for your class, try to make one before the school year working around your given textbooks or other given material.

4. Make study guides – make a study guide from your syllabus and draw before each topic two boxes: one for a midtest and one for the final test. When you have one of these tests, check the boxes when you’ve finished studying the chapter so you won’t miss anything!

5. Reference your material throughout – most of the times, we students work with in-class notes, textbooks and a syllabus. Since we get small bits of information here and there it’s important to reference every page throughout all your material so you can quickly access your information without having to flip endlessly through pages!

6. Keep a dashboard nearby – Whenever you use a notebook or a binder, make a dashboard on the first page with post it notes so you can quickly scribble any questions, homework or page numbers. When you get home, you just need to open your dashboard and attend those notes.

7. Print any tests, exercises and exams you can find – keep those in the end of your binder. These are perfect to practice before exams and tests because they really reflect what you will be tested about. Set an alarm clock for the deadline and start working on those!

8. Condense – organization disappears when you have too many of everything. Working with more than one planner in your life will make everything chaotic. If you think you need a second planner because you don’t have enough space to write in the first one, it’s because you don’t have available time as well. Don’t fool yourself and set achievable goals!

9. Customize your textbooks – most of the times, textbooks are formal books where information is hard to come by. Make your own tabs and write every chapter on them so they stick out – flag any charts, tables or graphics. Everything needs to be incredibly accessible!

10 Print a special planning sheet before finals: Organizing your studying by chapters and/or topics before finals is tremendously important since it lets you organize the amount of time you dedicate to each subject,

Study Sessions and Time Management

11. Save at least one afternoon or one morning a week for intensive studying. These is your “life-saver” – when you get so full of homework and projects that you can’t incorporate them into your daily academic routine, one free afternoon to organize your school life will really come in handy! Make an appointment with yourself!

12. Prepare in advance – although most professors may not ask you to prepare a class in advance, if you have the means to, go ahead. Grab a sheet and make a summary of the chapter your class will be about. Write the major topics and key information and take that guide to class. When your professor repeats previously studied information, you will be able to understand everything much better!

13. Never leave something behind – Even if you have a more light class, where professors don’t request homework or any side projects, don’t let that fool you! Be disciplined and be your own professors! Make your own projects and learn everything you can so you can nail those finals when they arrive.

14. Write your questions – most of the time, in a heavy study session, we come up with tons of questions and sometimes we just leave them behind. Write them down in your dashboard or a small notebook and ask your professors (personally or via e-mail). You can also ask your schoolmates in a facebook group created for that purpose!

15. Set an alarm clock and reward yourself – even if you study during an entire afternoon your studying will be pointless if you don’t take regular breaks. Set an alarm clock for one hour/one hour and a half and then take a 15 minute break. Never study for more than 2 hours straight! Even if you don’t notice, you’ll get less and less focused.

16. . Make a list – before each study session I like to grab my notepad and write down everything that I need to do before my session ends: the chapters I need to read, the pages I need to go through and the homework I need to complete. Sometimes I even write theses lists when I’m in college so I’ll have more determination to complete those tasks once I get home.

17 Work on the least interesting thing first. There are always classes or projects that we like the least – and those are the ones that we need to tackle first. You will start your studying session concentrated, which will let you go through the worst tasks faster.

18 Print, print, print. try to print everything you can and never study from your computer. Having your PDF files printed at hand will let you concentrate better, highlight and write some notes in the margins. You can take these everywhere with you and even turn them into small guides for future classes!

19. If you finish ahead, don’t quit. Perhaps the time you’ve saved for your study session has come to an end way before you have planned. That doesn’t mean you should stop right now – Take that time to review what you’ve learned so far or prepare other classes ahead of time!

20. Study in an organized space – make your own studying corner – bring everything you will need, from textbooks, binders and notebooks, to a cup of coffee and your computer. Keep them neatily organized on your desk so everything is at hand and on sight. Put on some soft background music (links down below) and adjust the lightning.

In class notes

21. If your professor provides PowerPoint slides before each class, print them (six or four per page) and bring them to class. Write in the margins and more throughout information in the back so it’s all condensed and tight. This is where you’ll take your notes. If you prefer to write on lined paper, think about copying some ruled paper to the back of your printed slides.

22. If your professor asks you to prepare your class in advance, try to make a small guide for each class. Open the comments column in MSWord and print the pages with that column. When you go to class, incorporate the in-class notes in that column, next to the relevant information so everything is nice and condensed.

23 If you are in a information-heavy class, try to adopt the Cornell method, which is the best, in my opinion, when you need to be a fast writer. There’s a video right here on how to use this method.

24. If you are in a bits-and-pieces class, which is that kind of class where the professor just gives a few key points and then gives practical examples or makes you work in group, try to adopt the box method – you can draw these boxes yourself or make them with post it notes – these are way more visual and perfect to memorize information.

25. Write in-class flashcards – if you don’t have flashcards around, make tiny flashcards on the top of your notes, where you cover the definitions you’ve written with the name of the definition. Each time you open your notes, try to remember the hidden definition. Automatic studying, every time!

26. Participate in class – nothing better than to be actively involved in your class discussion. For most of us, shy creatures, participating can be dreadful – but once you get out of your box, you’ll see how participating really makes you understand the subject!

27. If you have any questions during class, raise your hand and ask them. If your professor doesn’t like being interrupted, write them down and approach them in the end of the class. Sometimes, the little things we don’t understand are exactly the ones that come up on the final exam!

28. Ask for examples. Examples are probably the thing that makes your brain connect the information faster. If your professor isn’t keen on providing examples, suggest your own and see if your answer comes up right. Sometimes, examples are the thing that really makes us understand our material and our definitions, since they transform formal information into relatable events.

29. Sit at the front. It sounds too straightforward but sitting at the front really makes wonders. You won’t get distracted by what you classmates are doing, you will focus on the professor, who is right in front of you and you will resist the temptation of going to Facebook and Instagram during a boring presentation.

30. Write a brief summary at the end of the class. During those five minutes where everyone is dismissed and leaving the room, write a brief summary of that classes’ key points in the back of a page – this is fundamental in the Cornell method but can be used in any other method as well.

Finals Guide

31 Skim through your material two times: at first, you should start by studying your material starting from the end. The last lessons will be fresh in your memory and it’s very important to reinforce your knowledge on these while you can. In the second reading, you should start from the beginning, as usual. It’s important to make these two readings so you can go through the information in a much more flexible way.

 32. Make a mindmap of each chapter. A mindmap is a chart that relates key words and important information, making it easy to understand the relationship and hierarchy between such key words. Use colors and images to memorize your material better. Oh, and don’t forget to check out my video on how to make mindmaps!

33. Read each of the titles and try to say out loud its contents, explaining each concept and the relationship between them. Imagine you are the teacher and are lecturing that subject to a crowd. If you skip any of the subjects, do it all over again. The more you repeat, the better you will memorize.

34. It’s time for some flash cards!  Write the topic or the title on one side and the meaning or the explanation on the other. Try to cover as many topics or titles as you can and go through your cards while memorizing as best as you can each of the concepts. Try to do it backwards if you have time to do so!

35. On the day before the exam, skim through your mindmaps and flash cards again and always try to study while talking. Saying your content out loud will force your brain to relate information in a much more cohesive way and you’ll memorize everything much better.

36. Read the entire exam from top to bottom. Underline or circle any important words that you think will be crucial in you answer. After that, calculate how much time you should spend answering each question: this simple calculation will take only twenty seconds and will help you organize your time. Try to save five minutes at the end for revisions.

37. If you are solving a written exam and not multiple choice, try as much as possible to organize each answer in a structured way, saving two lines just to present your line of thought and writing each different argument in a different paragraph. Draft a conclusion at the end to underline the centre of your answer. Sometimes softly underlining some keywords is important to make your professor notice that you’ve correctly given importance to certain concepts.

38. Use these symbols for each question: one dot if you aren’t sure of the answer, two dots if you are sure of your answer and a circle if you are completely unaware of your answer. Start by answering any question with two dots; after those are all answered, go on through the two dots question. Leave the circle questions to the end – and ALWAYS answer them! Even if you don’t know what they’re about, who knows if you will be able to come up with something right?

39. Review your test one final time – many times, we make a lot of mistakes under stress and now is when you should spot them and amend them. This can be the difference between a B and an A!

40. Don’t take this too seriously – school is an important aspect of our lives but it isn’t everything. Failure comes many times and these failures can even drive you away from something that was simply not meant to be. Don’t stress out because everyone goes through the same!

Handwritten Note-Taking Methods

The appearance and organization of my notes plays a huge role in the amount of time that I dedicate to studying and my overall performance on tests.  Therefore, I’ve spent the past several years experimenting with various methods, and these are a few of the techniques that I’ve found to be most beneficial.

Cornell Method

The Cornell Method emphasizes identifying the key points of a textbook passage or lecture and consolidating information as much as possible.  

I’ve found that this style works best for literature and science courses that require extensive, dense reading and note-taking.  It allows me to easily and quickly identify what I understand versus what I still need to work on.

Adapted Cornell Method

I’ve created my own adaptation of the Cornell Method by eliminating the summary section at the bottom of the page and incorporating Post-It notes throughout the body of the page to highlight lists and key points.  And, of course, I had to add some color!

Outline

This is, by far, my favorite method due to its flexibility and clean, minimalist appearance.  While the image above doesn’t depict a true series of bullets at varying levels of indentation, you can experiment with different types of bullet points as well as varying spacing.  

I prefer using this method for maths because it allows sufficient space for me to draw graphs, record examples, and solve problems.  

Mind-Maps

Mind-maps are extremely helpful for organizing complex or extremely confusing topics.  There’s no right or wrong way to go about drawing one, and much of the final appearance will be related to the material that you’re diagramming.  Keep in mind that certain topics and information will more readily lend itself to this sort of portrayal.

For those of us who aren’t artistically talented 🙋🏼, these can be rather challenging to construct, especially when working with unfamiliar material.  In the past, I’ve used mind-maps for history when looking at isolated events or individuals.

The ultimate masterpost

**This is a list of helpful sites pulled from multiple masterposts. I will be updating this as I find new things.** 

IMPORTANT!!!!!!!!! I KNOW THE LINKS AREN’T SHOWING UP IF ANYONE ON HERE KNOWS WHY THAT IS PLEASE TELL ME ASAP! IF YOU GO AND EDIT THE POST SO FAR IT SHOWS THE LINKS BUT I HAVE NO IDEA WHY THEY WILL NOT SHOW UP ON THE ACTUAL POSTS

**If something doesn’t work let me know.** Thank you!

**If something belongs to you and you want credit let me know. I tried to make all the links go to a specific site. But I’m happy to give you credit if you see something that connect back to you.**

SAT/ACT

ACT Masterpost
FREE MATERIAL
Vocab

AP’s Non-Specific 

For every high school student studying an AP test 
FREE MATERIAL (some SAT/ACt stuff too)
Study guides

AP’s Specific

Art History
Smarthistory: a multimedia web-book about art and art history
Course-notes
Barrons pdfs

Biology
AP Biology Exam Guide
Chapter Review
Giant Review Sheet
Crash Course 

Calculus AB & BC
Cheatsheet (AB & BC)
Stuff You MUST Know Cold for AP Calc (AB)
If you see that, do this (AB)

Chemistry
AP Chemistry Notes
Podcasts
Quick Review
Periodic Table

Comparative Government and Politics
Government Comparisons
Cramsheet
Study Sheet (opens as word doc)

Computer Science
Review: Part 1

English Language
Rhetorical Strategies
AP Language Review

Environmental Science
Vocab to Know
Tips
APES Review

European History
STUDY GUIDES
Exam Review Sheets
Tom Richey 

French Language
Cram packet

Human Geography
Course-notes

Macroeconomics
Every Graph You Need To Know (YouTube)
Cram packet

Microeconomics
Study guide

Psychology 
sparknotes study guide
hella good review sheets
ton of flashcards woah
mind map of social psych
rough outline of the year
psychologists to know
crash course ~ hank green
intro to psych post
free textbook resources
study playlists help u
bunch of review materials
very good cram packet
lots of notes from a post
outline of erikson’s theory
mind map of disorders
how to stay motivated!!

Physics B & C
Equations (C Mech)
Unit Notes ©
Unit Notes ©
Equations © 

Statistics
Cram packet
Inference Procedures
AP Stats formulas

U.S. Government
Cheat Sheet
Review Materials
Tom Richey 

U.S. History
Cram Packet: part 1, part 2
The Giant AHAP Review
Unit study guides
Quizlet sets
The Comprehensive AP US History Study Guide
The man that saved me Part 1 Part 2

World History
Cram Packets and Review Sheets
Cram packets by era
Course-notes

General Subject’s

English Help
Cliffsnotes
Sparknotes
No Fear Shakespeare
How to Write a Essay (X) (X) (X) (X) (X) (X)
What makes a good Essay
How to Edit Yourself
Editing Checklist
Trouble Reading? Tips (X) (X) (X)
Writing Masterpost (X) (X) (X) (X) (X) (X) (X) (X)
Other things to help your Writing  (X) (X) (X) (X) (X) (X) (X) (X)

Languages 
Duolingo
Achieving Proficiency

Math Help
Mathway (type in your problem and it solves it)
Square Root Calculator
Cube Root Calculator
Expression Simplifier
Helps you with Math
Easy unit converter
Any calculator you need
Algebra Solver
Scientific Calculator 
Cheat Sheet 

Science Help
All about space
Guides for more than 5,500 animal species
Improve you Geography knowledge
vast collection of historic images and videos
Symbols and their meanings
Comprehensive site for genetics and evolution
Lectures 
Lab Write Ups

Writing Help
Free Microsoft Word Equivalent
Writing Software Master post
Cant Remember A Word?
Bibliography Maker
Social Media Citation Guide
Earn A Cute Picture Of A Kitten For Writing
Writers Block?
Check Your Writing for Spelling and Grammatical Errors
Coffee Shop Sounds
Essay Structure Guide
Want To Know Who You Write Like?
Remember the Word
Alternatives to Said
Great Inspiration
Getting Inspired
Free Microsoft Word alternative
Dealing with writer’s block
Lay vs. lie
When to change paragraphs
Music for writing
Research and reading
How to write a kickass essay with ½ of the stress
How to write an essay
Guide to writing a basic essay
Essay writing: the basics
What makes a good essay?
How to google? (1) (2)
Writing tips
Harvard Writing Resources
Synonyms Masterpost
can’t find the right word?
Hemingway an online editor (It’s awesome)

Other Useful Stuff 

Citing
Bibme
Son of Citation Machine
Owl Purdue
How to write Bibliography

College tips
make a to do+doing+done board (I just did this and it is very helpful)
print sources nicely (1) (2)
recipes based on ingredients - recipepuppy
popular new headlines - newsmap.jp
ted.com
speed read - spreeder.com
white noise - simplynoise.com
plan sleep time - sleepyti.me
google like a boss - png / jpg
planetebook.com/ebooks 
readanybook.com
prezi.com 
collegepackinglist.com
Tips for college freshman
Know before college 
Preparing for a lecture

Productivity 
30/30 (app)
Essential productivity apps for any student*
Top 5 productivity apps for iOS (video)*
Top 5 productivity apps for Android (video)*
StayFocusd
Time Warp
Self Control (mac) blocks websites
The science of productivity (video)
The science of procrastination and how to manage it (video)
7 brain hacks to improve your productivity (video)
The simple science of getting more done (in less time)
Productivity tips
About power naps
How to pull an all-nighter effectively

Studying (Currently long but I will sort through at a later point)
Answering multiple choice questions
Apps for students
Basics for Efficient Studying
BBC Bitesize
Calculators
Check spelling and grammar
Coffitivity- sounds of a cafe
Convert Anything To Anything
Cornell note taking method
Coursera- Online courses for free.
Create flowcharts, network diagrams, ect.
Creating Effective Exam Cheat Sheets
Defeating Procrastination
Essay writing
Exam survival tips
Finals Help Guide
Finals survival guide
Flashcards
Free Flashcards Study Helper
Free online courses
Google books for research
Grammar Check
Guide on punctuation
Homework Help
How to answer exam questions
How to Read a Textbook
How to Review in Less Time
How to study
How to survive finals
How to take notes Masterpost
How to Underline/Highlight Effectively
How to write an essay
Inkflow Visual Notebook
Khan Academy- Learn anything.
Learning how to study
Making a good study guide
Memorizing dates
Momentum- Be motivated and organised.
Note taking like a pro
Notetaking Strategies
Online calculator
Online Ruler
open2study- Free online study for everyone.
Presentation Zen- A blog that helps you with your presentations.
Productive Study Break Tips
Pull an All Nighter & Do Well On Your Exam
Quizlet- Make flashcards and test yourself.
Reading Review, Highlighting, and Underlining
Research & Reading Tips
Scholarpedia
School survival guide
Science simplified
Simple and Not So Simple Proven Ways to Sharpen Memory
Solving Problems vs. Practicing Them 
Studyblue 
StudyBlue- Make online flashcards.
Studying for an important exam
Study Playlist 
Superb Study Guides and Mini Moleskines
Taking Notes Effectively and Practically
Test-taking Strategies
Test your vocabulary
The Benefits of Active Notetaking
The “Secret” to Doing Well in School
Thinking & Memorizing Tips
Time management
Tips and trick to help you get good grades
Triaging Your Assignments
Useful websites
Website Blocker- Remove temptation.
What NOT To Do When Studying
Wikiversity
Wolfram Alpha for research 
Youtube Crash Course
“Academic Disaster Insurance”
“Big Idea” Flashcards

Textbooks
Free textbooks
Text Book Nova
Textbooks
Textbooks  
Ebookee
Reddit
BookFinder
Medical Textbooks
Cookbooks to Text Books
Science/Math Textbooks
Business Textbooks
Tech Books
Greek and Roman Text in English
Art Books
Historical Fiction
History Books
Project Gutenberg
Bookbyte
Free Ebooks
Books
Books
Books
Books
Classic Books
Classic Books
Classic Books
Classic Books
Classic books and Reference and study guides
Classic books
Free Textbook Download Masterpost
Textbook Guide

Organization
My Study Life - It’s a planner to help you remember when your homework is due and stuff like that
Free printable planner
To do list
How to make a study schedule
Class folder organization
“Study Cove” Organization
Making a Detailed Study Schedule
The Work-Progress Journal
Quick Tip for Flashcard Organization
Scheduling Organization
College Plan Spreadsheet Template
Organizing Your Notes
Getting Yourself Together in College with Mental Illness
How to Organize Your Workspace

Stress Reliefs/Relaxng
stress analyst - relaxonline
calm.com
distract yourself
self-care tips
self-care for overstimulated nerves
softest legs
feel better
Thoughts Room
Panic & Anxiety Masterpost
Guided Relaxation
Stress Relievers
Chill Playlist
Cute Videos
The quiet place project
Feelings Masterpost

Useful Stuff
plan, budget, and manage daily finances
How to take a Standardized Test
How to Master Excel
Fact check politicians
Back to school Masterpost
What you didn’t learn in high school

IDK what to put these under but they're helpful too
Check The Safety Of Any Website
Download From 8tracks
Print Webpages Without the Clutter
Is This Website Down For Me Or Everyone?
Self Defense Tips
Chrome Extension Tells You Which Tab Is Playing Music
Prevent Hangovers
Bookmark Online Videos
1 Month Free of Amazon Prime
Netflix Recommendations
Becoming An Adult Masterpost
All The Audios You’ve Ever Reblogged
Stream/Watch Free TV/Movies
Never Hit A Dead End With A Broken Link
Downloadable PDF To-Do Lists
Watch Musicals
List Of Universities On Tumblr
Summer Studying
Back to School

Scholarship Masterpost

8/17/2015: Updated some parts. Alphabetized the study section and added in new links. If at any point you want something added in that isn’t here just send me an ask or submit it in the submit box.

6/1/2016: Currently working on the issue of the links disappearing. Hopefully I’ll have it fixed 

anonymous asked:

hi. happy holidays. I'm going to start my college next month. I'm generally a messy student. I have a hard time managing my schedules and notes. I recently started following some studyblrs. but I'm still lost. I could really use some advice right now. love your studyblr btw.

Helloo! Happy holidays as well :-) Here are a few links that might help:

Here are some printables that might help you get organised:

I hope this helps!! Good luck with everything and thank you xx

A GUIDE FOR EVERY STUDENT: HOW TO STUDY SMARTER AND NOT HARDER!

A lot of us have difficulty when it comes to learning all types of new information. Especially when we’ve got other priorities to worry about. After much experimentation, I’ve found that the following tips helped me make the most of my time and also helped me plan much more fruitful study sessions!


- Designated Study Area.

A coffee shop, the library, a desk, or even your bed. Figure out where you are most comfortable studying - The right location provides comfort, no distractions and is quiet. Another factor to consider is timing. Are you a morning person, an evening person or a night person? Combine the time with the location and there’s your study area!


- The Key to Success is Time Management.

Plan your time using a simple schedule template, or make a simple to-do-list. The trick is to complete short tasks in a reasonable amount of time; like going over 5 pages of a textbook in approimately 15 minutes. Keeping a written schedule keeps you in line, and this way you won’t forget the tasks you need to complete for the day!


- Note Taking.

Personally, I like to keep a hardcopy of the days lecture and just scribble down any information that I think is important. BUT, there are some pretty cool note-taking strategies out there that you can utilise. Check out The Cornell Method, Mind Mapping, and the Split Page Method. Active learning produces more results than passive learning - so write down those notes and stay active!


- Meet the Syllabus.

The syllabus outlines the most important learning outcomes/ learning goals, and thats pretty much all you need to plan a productive studying session. 

Bid farewell to all that extra, unnecessary information. 


- What is your learning style?

Are you a visual, auditory, verbal or kinesthetic learner? Experiment with all 3 and find out which one works best for you. You don’t necessarily need to stick with one! Do you study better alone or do you prefer group study?  


- Bite-sized Learning.

Do not try to cram in a huge amount of information all at once. Instead, try breaking information down into learnable, manageable chunks. Combining this method with tip #2 will help you make the most of your time.


- Review, Review, Review!

It’s scientifically proven that the more you review material, the easier it’ll be for you to recall it when needed. So, take another look at your notes a couple of days after you make them, then again a week later, and so on.


These are the main tips I’ve found to be of help, and I hope they’re of use to everyone else!

UPDATED ON JULY 2017

Here you can find videos with advice on different categories related to college and studying! Just click on whatever topic you’d like to learn about :)

10 Bullet Journal Hacks and Ideas

Tips on How to Start a Bullet Journal

New Bullet Journal // Leuchtturm1917 [Mid 2017]

Minimalistic Planning Routine

My Planner Setup for 2016

Bullet Journal Setup for 2016

Bullet Journal 101

How to Plan for Final Exams

Bullet Journal Doodles and Decor

Plan with Me: Monthly Spreads

My Planning Routine

Bullet Journal [Early 2017]

How to Color Code your Notes

New Note Taking Method // Cause and Effect

How to Chose between Typed and Handwritten Notes

How to Type Notes for College

How to Take Notes from Textbooks

The Best, Fastest, Note Taking Method

Binder Tour 2015

Binder Tour 2016

Study Guide 101

Note Taking Tips and Advice for Typed Notes

How to Improve Typing Speed

How to Take Comparison Notes

Minimalist Binder Organization

Taking Notes with Microsoft OneNote

My 4 Types of Handwriting

The Cornell Method with Typed Notes

How to Be More Productive

The Ultimate Study Guide - 40 Tips

2 Different Ways to Use Sticky Notes

How to get Inspired to Study

Lecture Organisation and Preparation

How to have Efficient Study Breaks

How to Balance College and Life

My Study Routine

How to Have a Productive Summer

The Pomodoro Technique

How to Review and Study for Exams

How to Improve Handwriting

Time Management Tips

5 Tips for Exam Revision

College Organization Setup

How I Study for Tests

Presentation/Public Speaking Tips

Things I Wish I Had Known Before College

A Day with Me at Starbucks

My Evening Study Routine

My Morning Study Routine

Study With me For Exams // Timelapse

Huge Stationery Haul [2017]

Top 5 Best Websites for Students

ANDROID Apps for Studying and Time Management

School Supplies for 2016

The BEST Highlighters for Studying

My Favorite Pens for Handwriting

Desk and Study Space Tour

Minimalist Notebooks // mishmash

anonymous asked:

Hi optom! I'm very new to the studyblr community and it's my first term of university. I was a straight A student in high school and i am not performing well in my classes. In fact... I'm doing terribly. About a B to B- average. I know I'm probably not the first to go through so I've been trying to find posts that help students cope with this. Resources. Helpful tips. Is there a tag you can recommend? Any posts that you've encountered/wrote that I could peruse? Thank you very much for any help!

Hey there, thanks for asking. This is actually a very common problem experienced by people as they progress from high school to university. 

The problem is that mediocre study techniques and a combination of natural ability may have gotten you straight As whilst in high school, but it’s just not going to cut it in university. Cracking down on yourself and sitting down for more hours isn’t going to make your grades much better; it’s just doing more of the same mediocre studying. 

So you basically need to read up on good studying techniques and actually apply them to your studies


Everything You Need to Cover To Succeed As A Student

I actually have a web directory of all my study tips which already lists all these links.

So because the problem you have at its base is most likely that you’re using high school level techniques to tackle university-level problems, you’ll need to find resources on all areas related to good studying. For some of these areas, I have a related post, but for the more generalised topics like procrastination, I haven’t yet put one out because if I do, I want to be certain that the post will be unique, useful and practical. 

Without further ado, here’s a list of all the tags/areas you should work through and evaluate whether you need to change your current study habits if you want to be a 4.0/HD student at university. 

  1. Firstly, have a read of my recent answer about 20 Things You Can Do To Prepare for University, and click through to any of the parts of my 15-Part University 101 Series. 
  2. Time management
  3. Organisation (see Part 3 Studying and Part 8 Four Secrets from University and Part 11 Adapting to Uni Studying which covers how you can manage university workloads on the whole and specific changes to your studies you should make)
  4. Motivation
  5. Discipline / Staying Focused
  6. Procrastination (see post by @samsstudygram​)
  7. Study Methods (I’ve got one on the Blank Paper Method and the Cornell Method)
  8. Exams (I’ve got a multi-part series in the works)
  9. Study Materials (see Part 2 of my University Series for some tips)
  10. Studying from Textbooks (see Part 12 How To Study From Textbooks in Uni which deals with this specifically)
  11. Self Care (you can see my tag here of my own + useful curated posts)
  12. Spaced Repetition (use Anki!)
  13. Study Space (I have a masterpost with tips here)

Hope that helps! If you have a specific question about any areas then let me know! 

pretty much note taking masterpost

i am jumping in happiness when my last bullet journal prompts got idk 60+ notes??? aha im making a study masterpost because youre all a cutie !! <3 sorry it’s a bit short bc im in a rush rn. good day babies (ू•ᴗ•ू❁)

college note taking 101 by briellestudies

make your notes pretty af !!  by elkstudies

best notebooks  by second-year-studying

ashley’s tips by studyconfident

hermione’s “taking notes from a textbook” video by studyign aka the lifesaver

note taking masterpost  by elkstudies

note taking tips for lectures  by becoming-a-lawyer

strategies and skills by kimberlystudies

hints.. wink wink by lifeatmsmu

taking effective notes by hiccop

the cornell note taking method by brainyandbored

how to take great notes video 

take the best creative notes video

reese regan style video

inspos 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10

anonymous asked:

are any of your printables free? i love your stuff but it’s not really in my budget right now

Hey, yes! Here are all my freebies:

Also, all of my desktop and phone wallpapers are free to use xx

Note Taking

How to make nice notes:

  • Get a pen that works for you- It’ll make a huge difference. If you have cursive handwriting, a thin pen would be best. If you have thick, bubbly handwriting, a larger pen will suit. Make sure it’s comfortable as you’ll be writing a lot
  • Legible Handwriting- Trust me, it makes a difference. Practice is good but most importantly, take your time. When you’re re-reading your notes you want it to be as easy to understand as possible
  • Paper- Figure out what type of paper you like, whether thick, thin, graph or lined, etc.
  • Doodles & Decorations- Experiment with different simple drawings, colour schemes, banners, stickers, washi tape, sticky notes, pens… the possibilities are endless! Make your notes your own
  • Format- Also experiment with different formats. See if you like two or three columns, boxes of information, splitting your page in half, gluing sticky notes or other non-traditional note taking formats. It’ll make them unique.

How to be efficient:

  • Use the Cornell method or make your notes flashcards- testing yourself is the best way to learn 
  • Don’t obsess- Don’t spend ages on just one page, don’t restart if you make a simple mistake. I promise you people won’t notice amongst loads of papers. Use whiteout or cover it up but don’t waste time
  • Type your notes if it works- it’s faster, but be aware that some people don’t find this helps them remember them 
  • Don’t take down everything- Only information you need to remember and key points

How to be motivated to study them:

  • Have motivational quotes throughout- it’s cute, and a small boost as you go
  • Maybe reward yourself- by sticking some candy (the ones with wrappers of course!) or a cute pen or sticker on certain pages, say, every 20 pages. That way you will have something to look forward to
  • Be organised and have a plan- at the end of the day it comes down to discipline, whether with a to-do list or a bujo, have a plan and try your best to stick to it
  • Something is better than nothing- force yourself to do at least 10 minutes every day, usually, this is enough to get you in the zone and you will continue. If not, you’ve done 10 minutes more than you would’ve otherwise.
5

How to use Cornell note-taking method on OneNote - A tutorial on how to take class notes

Cornell note-taking method is really amazing, since it allows you to take clear notes and analyse it afterwards + can give you a brief idea on what the notes are about simply by looking at the key points. Of course, the last summary section can definitely help you to organise your ideas. All in all, it’s just a great motivation for you to go back on your notes after class.

This is often used by people who take notes by writing. Personally, I love taking notes using a laptop as it’s way faster + everything can be organised rather easily (especially with OneNote).


Tutorial on Cornell method

1. Course number as title for tabs; lecture no. as title for the page. I also insert the link of the class / any lecture materials provided here.

2. I type in key words and details (basically the two columns in Cornell method)

3. I format the two using “Heading 1″

4. Then i just take the lecture notes in the detail section using the outline method
- I also like to add in tags, like questions for any inspiring/thought-provoking questions posed my the lecturer, and important for key concepts (and to-do for coursework, if there’s any)

5. After class:
- I re-read the notes
- highlight anything i find important
- And input the key ideas in the left column for easy reference
- add in summary of the bottom of the page)

My highlighting system:
- Green: key words
- Yellow: ideas to note
- Orange: key points (for example like i will highlight the main categories of sth)
- Blue words: examples


Printing tip / Converting to pdf
If you want to print your notes, the onenote app on macbook usually do not format it well and cut the pages in a very weird way. Instead, you can print by accessing your notes on OneDrive (like through your internet browser). The last two pictures are how my notes for the first lecture turn out.


#9 || Link to my study tips series - i post once a week here!  (strive-for-da-best

cryptologic-linguist  asked:

Sup home skillet!( new nickname if you're okay with it!) I noticed you had really epic notes and that you said you had a masterpost for them but I can't find it, could you shoot me the link to it? Thanks!

Hi! Thanks :) I actually…. haven’t made that masterpost yet (because I am an epic procrastinator; its been a year, I know orz) 

Usually my final exam notes would look like this: 

above: usually a booklet with a contents page, coloured tabs, each section w a different heading scheme colour. Handwritten comments added after practicing past exams  

As to how I took notes during uni, my method was very similar to that outlined by  @strive-for-da-best​ (see links below), cept I used microsoft word 

BUT I AIN’T GONNA LEAVE YOU HANGING, so here’s a bunch of other posts I’ve made which tangentially address my note taking method + some advice from other studyblrs: 

(spot the number of times I’ve said something to the effect of “i’ll write up a post re: my note taking method lol fml)

/quietly retreats/