the coloring in this is out of control!

🌼 🌼 waiting for the mission to start, teaching the son important things  🌼 🌼

(Do Not tag as mcr//eyes or reblog to ship blogs i Will Know and i Will Block You)

Interstellar Cultural Exchange

A problem that we might have is the importance of food. There are certain things that I’m quite certain will be constant from culture to culture, and, barring the possibility of aliens taking control of  their evolution in such a way that they no longer need to eat, I think food would be one of them.

People would be careful in the beginning, but eventually some people would break more and more quarantine and contraband laws, resulting in unusual fusion which we might not be able to predict.


“What’s this apple-looking thing I’m eating?” 

“It’s actually an animal that sucks sap out of trees. Think of it as a vegetarian tick.”


“What is that?”

“It’s called chocolate, want some?”

***Two Hours Later***

“I see colors!”

“Chocolate is space cocaine. Got it.”


“Human, I have made gumbo using ingredients from my planet. Would you like some?”

“Isn’t your biome arsenic-based?”

“Your point?”


“Want some chips?”

“Are you insane human!? That has SALT in it! Are you trying to kill me!?”

an incomplete list of things readers want in ya, in no particular order, according to a question posed on twitter:

  • unlikable fantasy heroines
  • dragons
  • unipolar depression
    • “high-functioning” depression 
    • girls with depression
    • nonbinary people with depression
      • both of whom save the day!
  • anxiety
    • high-functioning anxiety 
    • chosen ones with anxiety
      • because that’s a stressful job
  • bipolar disorder
  • schizophrenia
  • OCD
  • characters with chronic illness / disabilities
    • without plots to overcome / magically fix their disability
  • mental health representation generally
    • with mental illness that’s maintained / managed
  • books with an emphasis on friendship
    • with friendship that doesn’t turn into a romance!
    • especially between people of different genders? boys and girls don’t automatically fall in love mate
  • books with an emphasis on family
  • books with an emphasis on platonic relationships generally
  • aromantic characters
  • asexual characters
  • aroace characters
  • demisexual characters and relationships
  • pansexual characters
  • polyamorous relationships
  • queer characters generally
    • especially in sff
    • but also literally everything 
    • seriously people just want queer books
    • AND MAKE THEM HAPPY
    • and maybe NOT in a coming out story kthx
  • nonbinary characters
    • especially in sff
    • who aren’t androgynous!
  • butch main characters
  • butch love interests
  • black boys in space
  • black boy wizards
  • intersectional sff generally
    • fantasy worlds that reflect the actual diversity of the world, what a wild concept
  • sff by people of color
  • native american / first nations authors
    • in all genres!
  • native american / first nations characters
    • in all genres!
  • two-spirit love interests
  • Native characters living their lives without the “poor” narrative
  • main characters you legitimately believe might die and aren’t safe just because they’re the main characters
  • guys with long hair
  • girls with short / no hair
  • heroines that are strong physically, not metaphorically 
  • series with different POVs in each book
  • male characters who stink after a week on horseback rather than smelling like fresh pine
  • imperfect chosen one narratives
  • lost princess stories 
  • snarky best friend as the lead books that leave you both confused (“WTF was that!?”) and in awe (“I LOVED IT”)
  • books you can’t place easily in one genre
  • obliteration of “she’s not like other girls” comments
  • girls supporting other girls
  • asian characters!!!
  • original fairy tales / dark, atmospheric contemporary fantasy
  • nonfiction
  • lesbians
  • bi girls
  • bi boys
  • bi characters generally
  • happy f/f ships 
    • especially with trans girls!
  • books that leave you going “well, that was a delight!”
  • characters who don’t get a romance but want one
  • hijaabis
  • teens who love and use science
  • more actual physical ships
    • the ones you sail
    • not the relationship kind
    • the arrrrr, matey kind
  • intersectional characters! (ie: bisexual with anxiety)
  • more than one person with an identity in a cast
    • did you know you can have TWO ASEXUALS in one story
    • whoa
  • retellings
  • selfish heroines
  • queer friendships
  • characters of color who don’t know their race / ethnicity 
  • non-WWII historicals
  • fat characters
    • fat LADY characters
    • who are HAPPY
  • evil narrators who don’t think they’re evil
  • evil narrators who KNOW they’re evil
  • arab main characters
  • healthy parent / child relationship
  • grandparent caretakers
  • parents that aren’t mysteriously dead for Plot Reasons
  • sex positivity
  • healthy views of the first time you have sex
  • hearing-impaired / Hard of Hearing / Deaf protags
  • hearing-impaired / Hard of Hearing / Deaf side characters
  • #ownvoices learning disabilities
    • autism
    • ADHD
    • dyslexia
      • not by parents of people with disabilities
      • ‘cause that’s not ownvoices babes
  • multiracial main characters
  • filipina main characters
  • eccentric thrillers
  • characters overcoming internal struggles without matching external struggles
  • well-written eating disorders
  • quiet stories
    • especially quiet fantasy
    • not every fantasy needs to be WE’RE ALL GONNA DIE
  • abusive controlling dudes getting called out and NOT being the romantic interest
    • abuse isn’t romantic writers sorry not sorry
  • interracial relationships not between POC / white character
  • queer interracial relationships
  • stories set in South Asia
  • stories focusing on social issue
  • multiple points-of-view
  • religious protagonists
  • non-Western narrative structures
  • college stories
  • study abroad stories
  • settings as characters
  • big cities
  • girls playing sports
  • Latinx characters whose families are from more than one country
  • Latinx characters who aren’t JUST mexican
  • books without romance
    • especially fantasy
    • or books with mental illness
  • characters of color saving the world
  • queer characters of color falling in love and getting a HEA
  • queer biracial characters
  • characters of color on book covers
  • queer characters who fall in love with each other
    • because y’know queer people aren’t just side characters or plot points
  • south indian main characters
  • people of color playing sports
    • especially asians
  • dudes of color as love interests without being exotic accessories to white girls
  • soft and gender-nonconforming dudes of color
  • asians of various religious backgrounds
  • dark-skinned heroines
  • disabled heroines
  • trans heroines
  • #ownvoices Jewish stories that aren’t about WWII
  • immigrant / expat stories
  • people who have moved a lot
  • multi-ethnic people and communities
  • immigrant stories
  • nonbinary aroace main character
    • there are currently none
  • contemporary YA set in the caribbean
  • disabled people of color
  • nuanced portrayal of domestic violence  + divorce + single parents in diapora Asian families
  • queer disabled South Asian characters
  • paranormal YA based on nonwhite cultures
  • #ownvoices Asian fantasy
  • #ownvoices arabian / south asian / islam-inspired stories
  • non-European fantasy generally
  • morally grey villains AND heroes
  • kids with a mentally ill parent
  • fantasy characters with allergies or asthma
  • pirates
    • lady pirates!!!
  • dumb but sweet dudes - no secret smarts here
  • books that start with an established romantic relationship
  • silly or rom-com-like SFF
  • main characters with glasses

tl;dr: if you are writing it, somebody is interested in it.

3 Study Methods You Should Use More Often

This was originally for an article writing assignment, but I thought “why not write something I can also post on my blog?” so here are three study methods that I haven’t seen a lot of in the studyblr community but are definitely worth mentioning.

The Leitner System

          Flash cards have remained one of the most popular ways to study. Some people use them to memorize vocabulary, remember answers to specific questions, or even associate dates with events. Although the use of flash cards is convenient, their effectiveness has been reduced due to most people’s habits of prioritizing each card equally and therefore spending too much time memorizing the information on them.

          The Leitner System, created by a German popularizer of science named Sebastian Leitner, is a more efficient method of studying that implements the concept of spaced repetition. All the cards start off in one pile. You would first scan through these cards, then test yourself. Each card you answer correctly goes to a second pile, while those you answer incorrectly should be revised then placed at the bottom of the pile. When you review the cards in the second pile and get them correct, they will be promoted to a third pile. An incorrect card will always get demoted to the first pile, even if they had previously been promoted to the last pile.

          The reason why this method is so effective is that you end up reviewing the first pile of cards more frequently—the cards you don’t know very well. Some people choose to review their Stack 1 cards every day, Stack 2 cards every other day, Stack 3 cards once every three days, and so on.

          Once all your cards have been promoted to the highest box, study them thoroughly and then start over. The continuous revision trains your speed so that you may reach fluency, which allows you to recall the information faster.

Timed Memorization

          The name tells it all: you memorize a certain text within a time limit, normally around five to ten minutes depending on your fluency and memorization abilities. When the timer starts, you begin memorizing. When time is up, you flip to the next page, even if you haven’t finished the previous page yet. Continue until you’ve gone through all your material.

          Timed memorization helps you to discipline yourself because your brain thinks that there’s no time for messing around; you have to do this here and now. Make sure to repeat the things you missed and revise everything frequently. This method is actually one of the most effective for cramming as it gives a better coverage than if you spend a whole half hour memorizing one subtopic.

The Memory Palace or Mind Palace

           Sound familiar? In BBC’s Sherlock, the ‘highly functioning sociopath’ uses this method to remember vital information and facts. A mind palace is a systematic arrangement of information, each detail corresponding to a specific object in a familiar place. To ensure that you really remember everything, the objects have to appear shocking and conspicuous.

           Here’s an example: if I wanted to memorize “crimson, 11, delight, petrichor (the smell after rain)”, aside from imagining Amy Pond or the Doctor saying it, I would first choose a place, let’s say my school. I’d imagine myself walking up to the front gate and seeing that the entire building has been painted the color of blood—crimson. The building would then rise as though it were lifted from the earth and crumble into rubble, controlled by Eleven, the character from Stranger Things. Now, since I can’t really picture delight specifically, I’d probably end up visualizing a colossal sign that simply reads “delight” posted in front of my school. As for petrichor, I’d imagine curves rising out of the puddles on the asphalt after a rainy night, a visual representation of the smell of the rain. Of course, these visualizations have been created to suit my memory. (I wouldn’t know if you watched Stranger Things.)

           I used this method when memorizing case studies for geography, although I chose to visualize fictional places from television series and cartoons. Some people do opt to create artificial places, but these often become blurry and are easily forgotten.

           As with any study method, repetition is vital to storing the information in your long-term memory. Visit your “palace” as often as you can. Soon enough, you’ll remember the data as well as you remember the place associated with the data.

So there you have it, three lesser known methods of studying that have proven to be immensely efficient. Now, there is no “correct” way to study, but there are methods that can ease your learning process.

Latinx women are breathtaking. Latinx women deserve to be treated like human beings because we are. Latinx women are so capable and strong and intelligent and amazing. Latinx women have come so far and deserve so much more. Latinx women deserve to be happy, healthy, and safe. Latinx women are multitalented and giving and we don’t hear it enough. Latinx women have broken barriers, can break barriers, and will break barriers. Latinx women are so precious. Latinx women are allowed to cry and have feelings and feel sad. Latinx women need to be treated with more respect. Latinx women deserve the world. Latinx women must be respected at all times. Latinx women are hardworking and discredited. Latinx women stand together and call out abuse. Latinx women are humans. Latinx women are deserving and great. Latinx women face so much adversity and don’t deserve the hatred they face. Latinx women are allowed to feel angry without people fetishizing their anger. Latinx women are deserving of life and respect no matter where they were born. Latinx women are not creatures, but humans. Latinx women are not spices, but humans. Latinx women are allowed to speak out against things that are unjust. Latinx women need more representation in the media. Latinx women come in all colors, shapes, sizes, and from all over the world. Latinx women speak any language. Latinx women are introverted or extroverted or ambiverts. Latinxs women are allowed to be shy or outgoing. Latinx women are doctors, lawyers, stay at home mothers, teachers, janitors, chefs, cashiers, hairstylists, dancers, politicians, sex workers, accountants, vets, dentists, volunteers, artists, public speakers, managers, therapists, nannies, models, writers, athletes- everything and all deserving of the utmost respect. Latinx women own their own bodies and are in control of their own lives. Latinx women love. Latinx women are allowed to feel numb. Latinx women are revolutionary. Latinx women are, but not limited to, bisexual, pansexual, lesbian, unsure, trans, asexual- unending. Latinx women are Muslim, Jewish, Christian, Buddhist, Atheistic, Agnostic, Pagan and more. Latinx women do not deserve to be fetishized. Latinx women are humans, not sex objects. Latinx women are allowed to struggle with physical, mental, and developmental illnesses. Latinx women are survivors. Latinx women are warriors. Latinx women are allowed to laugh and cry. Latinx women are allowed to rest. Latinx women are so much more than what is written in this post. Latinx women deserve justice. Latinx women deserve to not be spoken over. Latinx women deserve positivity. Latinx women deserve to not have their issues derailed or ignored. Latinx women are so beautiful.

anonymous asked:

I know Steve gets in a lot of dumb fights now, but what was the stupidest fight he got into pre-serum?

we grew up mostly during the prohibition, when alcohol was illegal. i mean, it was still pretty easy to get your hands on some, because people like alcohol, but most of it tasted awful, because it was home-brewed to be as strong as possible.
anyway, stevie and i got a bit of some really terrible hooch and squirreled ourselves away to get drunk. it took steve about four drinks to be totally wasted, and it turns out steve is a pretty entertaining drunk, with crazy fast mood swings and a tendency to want to touch things, just to see how they felt. he was wandering around the apartment trying to figure out if dark colors or light colors felt better, and he wanted to see if my hair–a nice dark color, versus his light blonde–felt nice. so i let him run his hand over the top of my head, and i was teasing him because he had all the fine motor control of a baby, so he’d made a mess of my hair. i think i said something like ‘my hair’s terrible now, stevie, and now nobodys gonna respect me’ and steve went ‘NO!! you have nice hair bucky your hair is GREAT it is SO GREAT.’ which was nice of him, because my hair really was a mess.

 and then he punched me.

he punched me several times. 

drunk steve is not much of a brawler so he didnt do much damage before i tipped him over and sat on him. it wasnt much of a fight. but if youre looking for stupid, attacking me to defend my own hair is probably one for the history books.

sometimes i miss wee steve, because big steve thinks my hair is ridiculous. i bet if tiny drunk steve were around, hed try and fight captain america to defend my hair’s honor. now that’d be a fight worth watching

A white guy’s thoughts on “Get Out” and racism

This weekend, I went to see a horror movie. It got stuck in my head, and now I can’t stop thinking about it—but not for any of the reasons you might think.

The movie was Jordan Peele’s new hit Get Out, which has gotten rave reviews from critics—an incredible 99% on Rotten Tomatoes—and has a lot of people talking about its themes.

First of all, I should tell you that I hate horror movies. As a general rule, I stay far, far away from them, but after everything I’d read, I felt like this was an important film for me to see. This trailer might give you some inkling as to why:

Creepy, huh? You might know writer/director Jordan Peele as part of the comedy duo Key & Peele, known for smartly tackling societal issues through sketch comedy. Get Out is a horror movie, but it’s also a film about race in America, and it’s impressively multilayered.

I left the theater feeling deeply disturbed but glad this movie was made. I can’t say any more without revealing spoilers, so if you haven’t seen the movie yet and you don’t want to have the plot spoiled for you, stop reading now and come back later.

Seriously, this is your last chance before I give away what happens.

Okay, you were warned. Here we go.

Our protagonist is Chris Washington, a young black man who has been dating Rose Armitage, a young white woman, for the last four months. She wants him to meet her family, but he’s hesitant. She acknowledges that her dad can be a little awkward on the subject of race, but assures Chris that he means well.

After unnerving encounters with a deer (echoes of The Invitation) and a racist cop, Chris and Rose arrive at the Armitages’ estate. On the surface, the Armitages are very friendly, but the conversation (brilliantly scripted by Peele) includes a lot of the little, everyday, get-under-your-skin moments of racism that people of color have to contend with: Rose’s dad going on about how he voted for Obama, for instance, and asking how long “this thang” has been going on. Chris laughs it off to be polite, though he clearly feels uncomfortable.

There’s a fantastic moment here, by the way, when Rose’s dad offhandedly mentions that they had to close off the basement because of “black mold.” In the midst of the racially charged atmosphere of the conversation, it’s nearly impossible not to take this as a racial remark, and Chris certainly notices, but what could he possibly say about it? Black mold is a real thing; his girlfriend would surely think he was crazy and oversensitive if he said it sounded racist. Chris never reacts to the remark, but that one tiny moment is a reminder to the audience of a real problem people of color often face, when racism can’t be called out without being accused of “playing the race card” or seeing things that aren’t there. (Incidentally, it turns out that the basement is actually used for molding of a different sort.)

There are other reasons for Chris to be unsettled: The only other black people on the estate are two servants, Georgina and Walter (Rose’s dad says he knows how bad it looks, but that it’s not what it seems), and something is clearly “off” about them. Later, more white people show up—and one more black character, and he, too, feels “off.”

By the end of the film, we learn the horrible secret: Rose’s family is kidnapping and luring black people to their estate, where they’re being hypnotized and psychologically trapped inside themselves—Rose’s mom calls it “the sunken place”—so that old or disabled white people’s consciousnesses can be transplanted into their bodies. The white people are then able to move about, controlling their new black bodies, with the black person’s consciousness along for the ride as a mere “passenger.” In a shocking twist, it turns out that even apparently-sweet Rose is in on the plot, and Chris must fight her and the rest of her family to escape.

This isn’t a “white people are evil” film, although it may sound that way at first, but it is a film about racism. I know many of my friends of color will connect with this movie in a way I can’t, so I won’t try to say what I think they’ll get out of it. I do want to say how I connected with it, though, because I think what Jordan Peele has done here is really important for white audiences. 

If you look beyond the surface horror-movie plot, this film actually gives white people a tiny peek at the reality of racism—not the epithet-shouting neo-Nazi kind of racism that white people normally imagine when we hear “racism,” but the “Oh it’s so nice to meet you; I voted for Obama” kind of racism, the subtle othering that expects people of color to smile and get along and adopt white culture as their own whenever they’re around white people.

So many of the moments in Get Out are clearly intended to work on multiple levels. When Chris confronts Georgina about something being wrong and she smiles and says, “No, no no no no no,” with tears streaming down her cheeks, the symbolism is blatant. How often do people of color have to ignore the subtle indignities they face and hide their true emotions in order to avoid coming across as, for example, “the angry black woman/man”? How many times do they find themselves in social situations—even with their closest white friends!—where people make little comments tying them to an “exotic,” supposedly monolithic culture, where they have to respond with a smile and a laugh instead of telling people how stupid and offensive they’re being? 

I can’t tell you the number of these stories I’ve heard from my friends, and I’m quite sure that the stories I’ve heard are only a tiny fraction of the stories that could be told. So there’s something in that moment that speaks volumes about the experiences of people of color in America.

The same is true for so many other moments. The black characters Chris meets at the Armitages’ have all symbolically given up their identities and conformed to white culture; when Chris meets one character, he turns out to be going under a new name, with new clothes and new mannerisms; when Chris offers him a fist bump, he tries to shake Chris’s fist. Again, within the story, there’s an explanation for all this, but every moment here is also about assimilation and culture differences. 

For me as a white audience member, all of these moments did something remarkable: They showed me my own culture—a culture I’m often blissfully unaware of because it’s all around me—as something alien. They reminded me that I, too, have a culture, and that expecting everyone else to assimilate to my culture is just as much an erasing of their identities as it would be to expect me to assimilate to someone else’s culture.

And that’s a big part of what Get Out is about—the erasing of identities, and the power of racism to destroy people. I think it’s really significant that racism is portrayed here very differently from how it’s normally portrayed in movies written by white people. In most Hollywood movies, you know a character is racist because they shout racial epithets or make blatant statements about a certain race’s inferiority. That allows white audiences to say, “I would never do/say that, so I’m not racist!” We really don’t want to think we are.

But notice something important about Get Out’s treatment of racism: This is a film about the literal enslavement of black people—racism doesn’t get more extreme than that—and yet Peele doesn’t go for the obvious by having the white characters admit that they think black people are inferior; instead, they subjugate and dehumanize people by claiming to admire things about them. They turn them into fashion accessories. 

When Chris asks why only black people are being targeted for this procedure, the response is telling: It’s not (supposedly) because the white characters think African Americans are bad, but rather, because they like certain things about them and they want “a change” for themselves. They want to become black—it’s trendy, we’re told!—but without having had any of the actual life experiences or history of African Americans. White people need to see this: to experience the ways in which Chris is othered by people who tell him all the things they like about him—isn’t he strong? Look at those muscles! Does he play golf like Tiger Woods? And he must be well-endowed and have such sexual prowess, right, Rose?

The white people in the audience need to be reminded that just because you’re saying positive things about someone doesn’t mean you’re not being racist, that turning someone into an exotic “other” may not be the same as shouting an epithet, but it’s still taking away someone’s identity and treating them as a commodity.

The film is filled with these kinds of moments. When we realize that Rose’s white grandmother has inhabited the body of Georgina, the fact that she keeps touching her own hair and admiring herself in the mirror takes on a whole new level of significance. (White people, please don’t ask to touch your black friends’ hair.) When Chris connects with a dying deer on the side of the road and later sees a deer head mounted on the wall at the Armitages’ estate, the symbolism is hard to miss. Black people are being turned into trophies in this house. And, oh yeah, they’re being literally auctioned off—as they were in real life in the not-too-distant past.

One day, I’d like to see the film again to pick up on all the ways things read differently the second time through. I noticed several things in retrospect that gain new significance once you know the ending, and I’m sure there’s a lot I didn’t notice. For example, Rose’s dad says he hired Walter and Georgina to care for his parents, and when his parents died, “I couldn’t bear to let them go.” The first time you see the film, it sounds like the “them” is Walter and Georgina. But in retrospect, it’s clear the “them” he couldn’t bear to let go was his parents, so he sacrificed Walter and Georgina for them. Which, again, is an example of how the supposed care of the white characters for the black characters (his care for Walter and Georgina, Rose’s care for Chris) is really all about caring for themselves and treating the black characters as completely interchangeable objects.

The message of the film isn’t simply that the black characters are “good” and the white characters are “bad.” There are presumably—hopefully—many good white people in the world of this film, and many others who wouldn’t do what the Armitages are doing but also probably wouldn’t believe Chris or make the effort to stop it. Peele’s mother and wife are both white, so he’s clearly not trying to paint all white people as villains. 

But I admit, as a white guy, I really, really wanted Rose to be good. I’ve been the white person in an interracial relationship introducing my black boyfriend to my family. I’ve been that. So I related to Rose, and I really wanted to believe that she was well-intentioned and just oblivious; even though she misses the mark on several occasions, there are times that she seems like she gets it and she really does listen to Chris. When a cop asks to see Chris’s ID early in the film even though he wasn’t driving, Rose stands up against the obvious racism, showing us all what it looks like for white people to do the right thing. “That was hot,” Chris says to her later, and I thought, yeah, that’s who I want to be.

So I have to admit, it was really upsetting to me to see Rose, the only good white character left in the film, turn out to be evil. But I realized that part of that is that I really wanted her to represent me, and that’s really the point. Just think how often horror films have only one black character who dies early on, and how many films of all genres have no significant black characters for audience members to look up to or identify with. I think it’s really important for white audiences to experience that.

As I’ve reflected on the film, it seems to me like there are three kinds of popular movies about people of color. There are those that feature POC characters that are essentially indistinguishable from the white characters—as if they just decided to cast Morgan Freeman instead of Tom Hanks without giving any thought to the character’s race. Then there are the movies that deal with racism, but in a way that allows white people to feel good about ourselves, because we’re not like the characters in the film. (This is especially true for movies about racism in the past; some of them are very important films, like Hidden Figures, which I loved, but we need to be aware that it’s still easy for white America to treat it as a feel-good film and think that we’re off the hook because we no longer have separate restrooms.) And finally, there are movies that focus more directly on the lives of people of color but tend to draw largely audiences of color; not many white people go see them, because we think they’re not “for us” (even though we assume films about white people are for everyone).

Get Out isn’t any of those. It’s drawing a broad audience but it’s not afraid to make white people uncomfortable. And if you can give me, a white guy, a chance to have even a momentary fraction of an experience of the real-life, modern-day, casual racism facing people of color in America, I think that’s a very good thing.

A Detailed List of Candles

I thought I would type up an extremely detailed list of candles today.

Of course you have you basic chime candles, but there is so much more! Here I’ll begin with the basic candle colors then go down through the list.

White: Protection, purification, peace, truth, binding, sincerity, chastity, happiness, exorcism, spirituality, tranquillity, can be used in any ritual, new begins, banishing, uncrossing, road opening. planetary magick, working with spiritual guides/assistants/friends.

Red: Protection, strength, health, energy, sexual attraction,vigor, lust, sex, passion, courage, exorcism, love, power, woman mysteries, mother goddess, Fire and working with its spirits, destruction, and masculinity.

Black: Absorbing and destroying negativity, creating negativity, jinxes, tricks, curses, protection, healing, banishing, attracting money, work with psychopomps, Crone, breaking addiction, astral travel, and spells to work with the spirits of the night. 

Blue: Understanding tranquillity, great for healing, meditation, patience, happiness, overcoming depression, work with spirits of the air, sky deities, rain spells, change, flexibility, subconscious mind, psychic powers, healing, water, ocean spells, and working with the Crone

Green: Earth, plants, healing, grounding, working with the Mother, working with the Hunter, money, finance, fertility, prosperity, growth, good luck, employment, beauty, youth, success in gardening, and gambling.

Gray: Neutrality, cancellation, stalemate, working with ghost, opening the veil, finding hidden things, psychic powers, and waxing & waning moon magick

Yellow: Color of air, charm, attraction, study, persuasion, confidence, divination, good fortune, psychic powers, wisdom, vision, sleep, health, metabolism, raising vibrations, and the mind.

Brown: Working with animals, healing animals, home, the hearth, and justice and legal work.

Pink: Love, honor, fidelity, morality, friendship, attraction, emotional healing, glamour, and self love.

Orange: Adaptability, stimulation, attraction, encouragement, legal matters, Solar magick, creativity, and spirituality.

Purple: Power, healing severe disease, spirituality, medication, exorcism, ambition, business progress, tension relief, command, compel, and control spells, and domination.

Most of these things have come from Kitchen Witchery by Marilyn F. Daniel, but then I have continued to add on as I’ve continued my path. I highly recommend the book if you are pagan or Wiccan.

I am going to leave out colors like gold, silver, and copper. I feel like those are very self explanatory. If they’re not reblog and I’ll type up another detailed list.

Now on to candle shape

Multiple day candles

Seven day candles! These candles are often called vigil or prayer candles. You can go to your local Botanica and buy some or you can order them.

Traditional these candles are prayed over and burned sequentially through out seven days. They are typically one shade, so use the list above to determine what you need it for. These candles are often dressed (anointed), by being removed from the glass and being carved, being drilled into, through the wax, and being stuffed full of herbs. They also sell different sizes of these candles, like an 128 hour candle. If you have a working deity like for example Hecate, you can then buy one of these monstrous candles and dedicate it to her, and save yourself some money. Don’t worry she’ll approve of the usage, but you can also find these candles with the name of the Orisha or a specific condition you wish to bring about. These candles also come as dressed or undress spell candles. You can by a vigil candle call Follow me boy/girl! or Lucky 7/ 7/11 candles, and etc. There are so many out and to truly write about each one deserves a separate post.

Then there is the famous seven or nine knobbed candle. These candles are often dressed and then prayed over for the amount of knobs there are. (If there is nine knobs then you burn a knob a day).

Figurine Candles

Adam and Eve/Lady and Gentleman  candles

These candles are simple suppose to be representative of a person. If you typically make wax poppets, I highly recommend being a lady and gentleman candle or the Adam and Eve candles. The only difference is one group is naked and the other is fully clothed. These are candles used when the spell is suppose to target a person or yourself. Carve your name/persons name on the bottom, and dress the candles. These candles come in a variety of shades, so again use the list above when selecting a candle. Two of these candles (same gender or opposite gender) can be tied together and burned to make two parties fall in love with each other. You can also burn each candle bit by bit to bring two people together, as you move the candles together in a line towards each other. 

Bride and Groom candles

These candles are designed to be used in relationship work. Blue can be used to smooth out any relationships, black for cursing and serration work, red for passion and love, pink for fidelity and love, white for marriage, spirituality, and new beginnings for a couple. I do not know when they began to sell these candles, but there are also Bride and Bride candles, and Groom and Groom candles! If you can not find one of these candles either use an Adam/Gentleman with an Eve/Lady, Eve/Lady with an Eve/Lady, or an Adam/Gentleman with an Adam/Gentleman candle for the relationship work. Just burn them side by side. I recommend using the Lady and Gentlemen candles for this purpose. 

Lover Candle and Heart Candle

These candles are mainly used in love magick. Lover candles are often used to instill passion, and Heart candles can be used in all forms of magickal love working!

Divorce Figurine Candle

Pretty self explanatory. Used to end a relationship between two parties, but also can be used to end a relationship that you are end. If one party is unwilling to move you can burn a divorce figurine (to remove them physically) and preform a cord cutting (getting rid of their emotional and spiritual connection to you) to get them out of your life. I would like to note, that if you are reading this and are in abusive relationship and think about preforming one of these spell, please reach out to those around you and call the police, and head to your friends house or local woman’s shelter. They have resources to help you deal with the abuse. Magick can help us in so many ways, but we must be the active parties to help ourselves.

Gargoyle Candle

Used for protection and I often use this candle to work with my protective spirit friends. I often have a giggle when I order this candle. I order this candle from Lucky Mojo and they have it labeled with “Gothic Cuteness”. I love that company!

Two tone candles

These candles often have two types of wax, and typically deal with removal of a curse. You will see these sold as double action or reversal. You have red and black (reversal or send back to sender), green and black (removal of a money jinx), and red and black (removal of love jinx).

Master Candle or Master Hand Candle

These are extremely powerful candles. These bring about conditions, and are unforgiving. Make sure to be careful for what you use them for. They come in many different shades, so refer to the list of colors above when choosing one.

I don’t necessarily uses all of these candles, but as the saying in my group goes. Knowledge is a witch’s truest power, because if we understand we can move and bend what stand in our way. 

I don’t remember where most of this information as comes from since it is coming out of my spell book. A lot of this information as been passed from mouth to mouth and passed on to me. I hope this helps everyone move forward in their craft or at least I hope it provides a good read!

Stereotyped vs Nuanced Characters and Audience Perception

Writing with color receives many questions regarding the stereotypes Characters of Color and their story lines may possess.

There’s a difference between having a three-dimensional character with trait variance and flaws, versus one who walks the footsteps of a role people of their race/ethnicity are constantly put into. Let’s discuss this, as well as how sometimes, while there’s not much issue with the character, a biased audience will not allow the character to be dimensional.

But first: it’s crucial to consider the thinking behind your literary decisions.

Trace your Logic 

When it comes to the roles and traits you assign your characters, it’s important to ask yourself why you made them the way they are. This is especially true for your marginalized characters.

So you need an intimidating, scary character. What does intimidating look like on first brainstorm? Is it a Black man, large in size or presence? (aka a Scary Black Man) A Latino with trouble with the law? If so, why?

Really dig, even as it gets uncomfortable. You’ll likely find you’re conditioned to think of certain people in certain roles on the spot.

It’s a vicious cycle; we see a group of people represented a certain way in media, and in our own works depict them in the way we know. Whether you consciously believe it’s the truest depiction of them all or not, we’re conditioned to select them for these roles again and again. Actors of Color report on being told in auditions they’re not performing stereotypical enough and have been encouraged to act more “ethnic.” 

This ugly merry-go-round scarcely applies to (cis, straight) white people as they are allowed a multitude of roles in media. Well, then again, I do notice a funny trend of using white characters when stories need a leader, a hero, royalty, a love interest…

Today’s the day to break free from this preconditioned role-assigning.

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3

@sukikobold said:

I always want to see more acrobatic stuff with Raz. :)

It took awhile but here! Seriously, I love that there’s a plausible reason for Raz being so good at the platformer puzzles in Psychonauts. I wonder if he visits his family at the circus sometimes to perform super fancy stunts with some psychic abilities added in for extra showy-ness :’D My sister is also struggling through the Meat Circus level currently, and I couldn’t help drawing something for it Ovo;;; wish her luck

Also, kind of unrelated, I bet the Aquatos have circus animals. Like elephants. Or a tiger Raz has become really close with because one day he found out he could talk to her :’)

blue orchids

hanahaki & soulmate au (reposted)

pairing: jungkook | reader
genre: angst and a sprinkle of fluff
word count: 18.748
warnings: implied smut
disclaimer: I do not own the hanahaki disease concept.

I am immensely thankful for the talented people who have created art / edits for this story: x, x, x, x, x, x ♡ also, make sure to read moonlight (drabble from jimin’s pov) and home after rain (short sequel) after reading this story. enjoy!


You were eighteen years old when Jimin’s name showed up on your hand.

The day is fresh and clear in your memory: early December, the winds stronger than ever as they threatened to pierce through the windows of your room, hints of snowflake dancing in the air as the first snowfall augured an even sharper winter. There was a smile on your face that didn’t match the unrelenting coldness of the month, and even though the night was falling and the air felt icy on the tips of your fingers, there was only warmth in your chest as you went through the pictures of your phone.

Pictures of you and Jimin drinking hot chocolate, of clumsy iceskating, of funny faces that made you laugh out loud in the quietness of your bedroom. The feeling sparking in your chest could be considered somewhat dangerous— after all, you were just a girl that didn’t have any marks on her skin, a girl whose fate was yet to be decided. Something as enigmatic as love could be a treacherous thing, too risky for someone that couldn’t decide their destiny on their own.

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Explaining sensory overload and hypersensitivity to neurotypicals

so in a discord im in, me and @kuonabnaq started explaining hypersensitivity and sensory overload in terms people who dont experience them will understand and i thought they’d be useful to people! i’ve seen sensory overload and hypersensitivity explained decently, but never in ways people who don’t experience them will understand well so here’s some ways!

Sound

yknow that feeling you get from nails on a chalkboard? every sound does that

or yknow that feeling you get from nails on a chalkboard? every sound i cant control does that (since sometimes music helps - its a controllable sound)

Vision

“when you come out of a movie theater and the sun just pokes your eyes” - that, with every colour in my vision field

or the light at the dentist which goes right into your eyes, but with all light (including lights, colors, etc..)

Touch

when you forget that the sand on the beach is painfully hot and stand for a second too long, but with all contact

or when you get a bad grape but with everything

Smell

smell is when you walk past someone with a ton of perfume/cologne but for everything

or one of those really weird acids you have in chemistry, you know? Those that just shoot right up to the back of your head when you make the mistake of smelling it directly.

or walking into a lush/bath and body works/other similar store, but always 
(first and third are especially good if you want to highlight the ‘even good smells are bad smells’ thing)

How Feyre’s Character Development Is Shown In The Covers Throughout The Series

I love how simply the covers of the ACOTAR series shows Feyre’s character development throughout the series. It’s mind blowing to be honest. 

You can see in ACOTAR how Feyre is standing straight. Although it could be said she’s standing upright for confidence during the last part of the novel, we know her stance could also show her complacence throughout the novel. Especially after reading the books and from the events that happens within ACOTAR. Her stance also looks stiff to an extent, showing how she is still submissive or under someone’s command. Furthermore, there is only half of her on the cover as if she’s trying to hide herself. The red in the background also indicate either her anger, loss, and/or death prior to reading the novel. The roses, obviously, fits with the title of Thorns and Roses but can also foreshadow Feyre and Tamlin’s relationship in the novel being like a rose: seemingly beautiful and sweet but, in honesty, is also harmful like the thorns of a rose. Her dress is also more conservative (?) (if you compare it to the other two in ACOMAF and ACOWAR) yet provocative (?). It covers most of her stomach and legs, showing how she was still insecure about herself and the only reasons she willingly used an outfit with a front that low is because she was either told to (although I have absolutely no judgement if she wore that willingly, she would work it just fine tbh haha). You could say her outfit is elegant (since it’s from Rhysand ofc) yet it gives off the vibe that she was made to wear it - something she is not use to given her awkward stance.

In a ACOMAF you could see how she is standing more fluidly on the side of the book. She is no longer stiff but looks more comfortable with her body. Her pose exerts confidence and strength, especially with her hand and the way it’s positioned above the wind as if she’s controlling it (which she probably is in some way if you think of Rhysand being the wind since he can fly etc., etc.). More of her is now shown on the cover as if she’s having the courage to step out of the book and show herself on the cover for what she is. Feyre’s hair blowing the way it is can show that she is in movement and could be fighting unlike her previous state in the Spring Court. Her outfit has also upgraded into more of an armour, showing that she is stronger now and fighting for herself compared to the beginning of ACOTAR when she was at the Spring Court. Furthermore, the armour could also indicate that she is working with someone else since we know from ACOTAR that the Spring Court does not have armours of the sort for females but only dresses (egh). The cover, once more, also fits with the title in accordance to the Mist and Fury part: misting is a skill Rhysand has (somewhat a foreshadow that Feyre’s mate might be Rhysand) and fury could indicate either Rhysand’s fury at the events that occurred Under the Mountain or Feyre’s fury at Tamlin showing his true self. Her tattoo on her left arm from Rhysand is also much more visible than her tattoo in the ACOTAR cover, as if she’s no longer trying to hide it like before but showing it off. The color blue is also known as reliable, calm, creative, intelligent, and maybe responsible (from a Google search I did). This foreshadows (EVEN MORE) about Feyre’s personality as we know she stopped painting for a given amount of time before starting again in the Night Court. The blue also indicates calm, intelligence, reliability and responsibility, all of the things Rhysand and Feyre are. Especially the reliability part foreshadows Feyre and Rhysand’s relationship as we know that she trusts him even though she denied it at first. The small city silhouette in the background can also show that she is in Velaris instead of the Spring Court where she only knows Tamlin’s home (palace?). 

NOW IN ACOWAR. LET ME JUST TALK ABOUT THE OUTFIT FIRST. Previously Feyre was wearing armour, as if she was an accomplice of Rhysand’s Inner Circle, working with them to take out Tamlin and Hybern. NOW, NOW IT’S A FUCKING DRESS THAT SHOWS SHE’S A HIGH LADY BUT STILL STRONG AND FIGHTING FOR HERSELF. The design (by the lovely @charliebowater ) practically exudes confidence, strength, and her ability to see what is wrong and right (especially with the eyes on her belt but that could also foreshadow Jurian since his eyeball was Amarantha’s ring). The glistening of the bottom of her dress could also represent starlight, connecting back to the Night Court and Starfall possibly. The position of her arms and the way she’s now showing off both hands and the tattoo shamelessly indicates her confidence with being a part of the Night Court and Rhysand’s Inner Circle. The way her hands are resting on her hips further proves my point of her growing confidence as she stands as if she’s ready to face anything. Also, her full body is now on the cover unlike in ACOTAR when only half of her was showing. This can be seen as her way of finally discovering and accepting her strengths and, once more, exuding confidence. She’s also holding an Illyrian blade, far different than before when she was only showing her hands in the ACOMAF cover. This shows how her abilities have furthered and that she could fight now, with a blade (cause we know her speciality is actually a bow) and with her powers (which is explained in the next sentence). The mist around her could show how her strengths in misting may be improving in the novel compared to when she was still first training with Rhysand and, maybe, her fire powers also since we can interpret this as smoke too. We already know she can control her water powers very well. The color green, after a Google search, portrays balance, harmony, nature but also envy. The balance and harmony of the green could be a foreshadowing of the ending of ACOWAR and how, possibly (hopefully, dear lord hopefully), the ending might be peace amongst Prythian once more. The nature part of the green could indicate the Spring Court and her return. However, the envy part of green, what I really think, is referred to Tamlin and his envy. I feel like he will end up finding out about Feyre being mated with Rhysand and he will be even more envious (pray to the Mother that Tamlin doesn’t do anything stupid like he already did). HER HAIR, again it’s blowing showing that everything around her might be in motion and she’s ready to take them down like she promised. The background also has mountains if you look close enough. This may be a foreshadow that Feyre and the Inner Circle may have to return to Under the Mountain once more to fix Prythian (this is making me extremely nervous). Finally, the title. Lord, Mother, I love Cassian so much please don’t let him die. The cover fits with the title of A Court of Wings and Ruin once more although not entirely: the wings part may be a foreshadowing (I’m sorry I repeat this stylistic feature so much) to, sadly, Cassian’s wings (although I still refuse, to believe it). The “ruins” part may be referring to how everything is falling apart just like the ending of the last book but, this time, it might be the actual ruin of the Spring Court and Hybern. Maybe even Under the Mountain since there are mountain silhouettes in the background. 

Well, that’s my interpretation of the covers. I felt the need to do this the moment the ACOWAR cover came out. I noticed her stance change and the way she brings herself. I couldn’t resist myself.