the cleveland browns

9

NFL player Joe Haden is taking a powerful stand against the “R-word” 

Joe is an NFL cornerback for the Cleveland Browns. Jacob, his younger brother, is Joe’s biggest fan. Jacob also happens to have a cognitive disorder that limits his speech and language capabilities. Via the Special Olympics and activism, the two are inspiring people everywhere — and the story of how Joe saved Jacob’s life is just the beginning.

This is a map from The Blaze that shows what NFL team dominates your region by county. This map shows America says fuck the New York Jets because they didn’t win even one county.

My headcanon: Sportacus knows very little about pro sports. He doesn’t keep up with them…at all, really. After all, he doesn’t watch TV, and he spends most of his time with kids or in his airship. Lazytown doesn’t have a pro sports team, I don’t see him visiting a rowdy stadium to catch games.

One day an adult says something about a nearby sports team, like, “I’m a Browns fan, I’m used to disappointment, haha!” (example taken from my Ohio, USA experience), Sportacus smiles, and nervously laughs.

Later, Robbie comes up to him, and asks, “Oh, Sportaflop~ I have a little question for you. What sport do the Cleveland Browns play?”
He lets Sportacus sputter a little.
“You don’t know, do you?”
“No, Robbie,” he admits. “I don’t.”
Robbie makes fun of him for a bit. “And by the way, they play FOOTBALL.”
After all, Robbie may hate sports, but from watching so much TV he actually has a better approximate knowledge of pro sports than Sporto.

Family Guy MBTI

Stewie Griffin 
INTJ [The Scientist]

Originally posted by jet1282

Imaginative, quick and creative INTJs are intellectually curious who can grasp complex problems and data, analyse them quickly and come up with solutions. They are the strategic problem solvers preferring the big picture to the mundane and set high standards for themselves and others. Getting close to the INTJ will take some time, and they may not always involve others in the decision-making process. This can make them seem slightly detached, but it is simply that the processing which takes place, (and a great deal of processing takes place), goes on inside their heads and this can make others feel a little left out.


Peter Griffin
ESFP [The Entertainer]

Originally posted by helehains

The ESFP is interested in people and experiences and their dislike of rules and routine, are justified by their view that their reason for existing is to bring harmony, sympathy and support to peoples’ lives saying ‘I just had to do something to help.’ The keywords here are 'do’ and 'help;’ caring and practical in equal measure. The ESFP has an ability to make others feel so special. Down to earth and practical, ESFPs live in the here and now preferring to take life as it comes with the optimistic view that it’s bound to be good, (and if it isn’t then there’s always next time!).


Lois Griffin
ESFJ [The Supporter]

Originally posted by gifheaven

Organised, caring and driven by duty the ESFJ loves to contribute and remain constantly valued, productive, busy and liked. The ESFJ has an action-orientation that they will channel into people, helping and finding practical solutions to people issues and they’ll work hard at making this happen as they are naturally oriented to the needs of those around them. Whilst the ESFJ wants everyone to feel valued, they will also want to feel part of the group themselves - they need to feel included. If someone is hurting, the ESFJ will be the first to respond.


Brian Griffin
INTP [The Engineer]

Originally posted by all-stoners-united

The INTP is intellectually curious and enjoys the more complex and theoretical problems, often for their own sake. Practical application has little interest for them, preferring to identify the solutions and then leave someone else to plan the work. They do however like things done properly and have very high standards. The routine, the detail bores them rigid and they will put off completing tasks, especially those that they see as unnecessary, preferring to 'blitz’ them nearer the deadline. For the INTP follow-through does not come naturally, and completion will be via huge bursts of energy at the last minute but it will be done.


Meg Griffin
INFP [The Dreamer]

Originally posted by family-guy-gifs

To the INFP life is a long quest for meaning and harmony and their personal values are so important to them. This means that it is essential to the INFP that their beliefs and their actions are totally in sync at all times. An INFP is unlikely to take any action which they don’t believe in their heart is right. Yet there is a crusading side to the INFP that would surprise even those who knew the person well. When a personal value, or belief is trodden on, then the INFP can become uncharacteristically outspoken but their values are usually so well hidden that the other person may not realise they have done so.


Glen Quagmire 
ESTP [The Adventurer]

Originally posted by thwaggity

The ESTP is constantly looking for the 'next big thing,’ and immersing themselves in social activities with gusto. The imaginative, reflective life is not for them, preferring to jump in and see what happens. Supreme optimists, ESTPs will work long and hard on activities which interest them but can switch tack entirely once they begin to lose this interest. The ESTP does not enjoy the constraints of deadlines, schedules or end-dates so if an ESTP does exactly what you asked them, it is only because they wanted to in the first place. ESTPs love to be at centre stage, demonstrating feats of wonder and daring.


Chris Griffin
ISFP [The Artist]

Originally posted by dangerous-classy

Focusing on the here and now, the ISFP will live life to the full, cherishing the present moment, and finding real pleasure in the more sensory and practical activities such as painting or handicrafts. They need an inner balance, a kind of karma for their lives and this means keeping things as uncomplicated as possible. Planning and control are not for the ISFP, they much prefer to stay in the background doing the things they like, keeping a balance, which includes choosing to remain, happily disorganised. Quiet supporters, rarely will an ISFP be the leader, preferring to remain behind the scenes, observing, understanding, but saying very little. 


Cleveland Brown
ISFJ [The Defender]

Originally posted by cherryteresa

ISFJs are the people-centric doers, using their considerable organisational ability to make sure people are taken care of and protected. They are extremely conscientious, hardworking, loyal and dedicated, to people, organisations, groups. Once they are allied to the cause they take their roles very seriously. They have incredibly clear and precise memories and are scarily accurate with facts, figures, names, faces - oh and any person who has slighted them! The ISFJ gathers facts and data and are painstakingly accurate with incredible attention to detail, and extremely methodical in their approach. 


Joe Swanson
ISTJ [The Inspector]

Originally posted by 404-unknown

Serious-minded, individualistic and thorough, the ISTJs like to plan, schedule and drive through to completion, in a logical linear sequence. Any deviation from the plan would be questioned and may take some convincing of its merits. The ISTJ is essentially the engine room, the behind-the-scenes worker making it happen. Concentration, willpower and persistence epitomises the ISTJ approach to work and to life and they will begin at the beginning and end at the end. Spontaneity and flexibility are less important to the ISTJ. Conservative and risk-averse ISTJs excel when it needs a steady hand and they are unlikely to EVER drop the ball.


Descriptions from Prelude Character Analysis.

Five You Should Know: Organizing for Change

As we begin Women’s History Month, we are excited to highlight the efforts and the abilities of African American women. African American women have made tremendous contributions toward the freedom, equality and thriving culture of African American communities. However, these stories are often historically lost to us or overlooked within the American story.

The women here represent a continual pursuit of equality through organizing, led by African American women. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook, and join us in sharing #HiddenHerstory during the month of March. 

1. Hallie Quinn Brown

Photo: Photo from Homespun Heroines and Other Women of Distinction, edited by Hallie Quinn Brown, 1926. 

Hallie Quinn Brown (1849-1949) helped organize the Colored Women’s League in Washington, D.C., one of the organizations that merged in 1896 to become the National Association of Colored Women (NACW). She served as president of the NACW, from 1920 to 1924. Brown is among many other notable founders of the NACW, to include Harriet Tubman, Mary Church Terrell and Ida B. Wells.

Brown also served as President of the Ohio State Federation of Colored Women’s Clubs between 1905 and 1912. During her last year as president of the NACW, she spoke at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland. Brown had a reputation as a powerful orator. In 1899, while serving as a U.S. representative, she spoke before the International Congress of Women meeting in London, UK on women’s suffrage and civil rights.

2. Madam C.J. Walker

Photo: From Homespun Heroines and Other Women of Distinction, edited by Hallie Quinn Brown, 1926. 

Madam C.J. Walker (1867-1919) is widely known for her successful beauty and haircare business, produced by her Madam C.J. Walker Manufacturing Company. However, Walker’s life also includes a long history of activism and philanthropy toward racial equality and civil rights. During World War I, Walker was a leader in the Circle For Negro War Relief, in the effort to establish a training camp for black army officers. In 1917, she joined the executive committee of the New York chapter of the NAACP, which organized the Silent Protest Parade on New York City’s Fifth Avenue. More than 8,000 African Americans participated in protest of a riot in East Saint Louis that killed thirty-nine African Americans.

Walker was also a supporter of Marcus Garvey, donating to the mission of the Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA). She was joined by Garvey and others when she founded The International League for Darker People in 1919 in the U.S. The organization aimed to bring together African Americans with other non-European people to pursue shared goals at the Paris Peace Conference following World War I. In particular, the organization made connections between Asian and black communities and for solidarity within their liberation movements. Walker’s life of activism is a reflection of her desire for global equality.

3. Barbara Smith

Photo: Portrait of Barbara Smith.

In 1973, author and lesbian feminist Barbara Smith, with other delegates, attended the first regional meeting of the National Black Feminist Organization (NBFO) in 1973 in New York City. This meeting resulted in the founding of the Combahee River Collective. The Collective’s name was suggested by Smith, who owned the book, Harriet Tubman, Conductor on the Underground Railroad by Earl Conrad. The name commemorated an action at the Combahee River planned and led by Harriet Tubman on June 2, 1863, in the Port Royal region of South Carolina. The action freed more than 750 slaves and is the only military campaign in American history planned and led by a woman. The Combahee River Collective emphasized the intersections of race, gender, sexuality and class oppression in the lives of African American women and other non-white women.

Smith also established the Kitchen Table: Women of Color Press in 1980, an activist feminist press that published several pamphlets and books. Many of these works became widely influential and adopted into many courses of study. Smith continued her work as a community organizer, when she was elected to the Albany, New York city council in 2005. She was an advocate for violence prevention, and educational opportunities for poor, minority and underserved people. Smith continues to be activist for economic, racial and social inequality.

4. Marsha P. Johnson

PhotoMarsha P. Johnson Black & white version of Andy Warhol Polaroid.

Marsha P. Johnson (1945-1992), a drag queen and gay liberation activist, is known as one of the first to fight back in the  Stonewall riots, a series of violent demonstrations among the LGBT against police raids. In the 1970s, Johnson and a friend, Sylvia Rivera, cofounded the Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries (STAR), an organization that promoted the visibility of the gay community, particularly through gay liberation marches and other political actions. The organization also worked to provide food and clothing for young drag queens, trans women and other kids living in the streets in the Lower East Side of New York. In the 1980s, she continued her street activism as a, organizer and with the AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power (ACT UP). 

5. Charlene Carruthers

Photo: Charlene Carruthers, Photo Courtesy of BYP100 Project.

Charlene Carruthers is a black queer feminist activist and organizer. In July 2013, Carruthers with 100 other black activist leaders from across the U.S. were assembled by the Black Youth Project in Chicago for a meeting. The meeting convened with the goal of building networks of organization for black youth activism across the country. However, it was the verdict of George Zimmerman regarding the death of Trayvon Martin, that inspired Carruthers and the other activists to form Black Youth Project 100 (BYP100). The group was created to organize and promote young black activism in resistance to structural forms of  oppression. BYP100 trains youth to be leaders, to empower a younger generation of black activist.