the children of 911

My manager and his wife just lost some close friends of theirs to murder-suicide. Allegedly, they were having a spat and the husband shot the wife and then himself. He died at the scene, which is also their backyard, she died later at the hospital. The youngest of their three teenaged children is the one who called 911 to report gunshots heard outside the home, not knowing it was his dad taking the life of their mother and then his own.

My manager has been coming to me all week to talk about it all, to vent and to work through processing his thoughts and feelings, asking me how he could talk to his wife about it to help her as she was closer to the wife than he was with either of them. They played tennis together and she saw them the night before it all happened.

I struggle to listen and bite my tongue because the thought of it all just feels so crushing to me and I can’t find a single word to say to relate to him or his wife or what they might be feeling.

Suicide - the taking of ones own life. Trying to understand that seems like jumping into a bottomless pit.

Those poor kids. And all the sweet memories they won’t be making with their parents. And all the questions that will never get answered. The what ifs that will plague them. No more hugs. No more adventures. No more wisdom passed down. No more firsts or milestones together.

I don’t know any of them but I feel completely broken even knowing that it happened.

A 911 Operator Warning You to Stay Safe

Story by fbis-most-unwanted/reddit

It’s kind of a running joke in my office that I always get the weirdest calls, and it’s true. One of the more interesting ones I got was from a drunk guy who meant to call the cops and was trying to file a noise complaint about his own party. While some of my calls can be pretty strange, they’re usually fairly tame. I’ve been pretty lucky because I haven’t had too many disturbing or sad stories to tell from my years working as a 911 operator. If you’re looking for something like that, I can point you to several of my colleagues because unfortunately, there’s no shortage of those in this industry. 

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When I was still an intern a few months ago, I had my first attempted suicide patient; She took a fistful of pills and drank some alcohol. Seeing as she was alert, oriented, non combative, and with generally normal vitals, it was a BLS call. Her reasoning for attempting to kill herself was that her children were being taken from her. A close friend had called 911 and met us when we arrived, explaining she has had bouts of depression and was worried when talking on the phone with her because she kept saying she had no reason to live anymore.

I’d never had any experience dealing with someone depressed before her, it was an eye opening experience. She was quiet most of the ride to the hospital, but tears kept streaming down her face as she stared straight ahead. When asked how she felt, she just closed her eyes and shook her head.The AIC of my truck was very calm and professional and taught me alot about how to handle a patient like her. It was a very sad situation to experience, and like with many of my patients, I had no idea what was going to happen to her or her children after such an event.

Well I had forgetten all about her until I saw her face again at some breakfast place on a Sunday morning a few weeks ago. She was actually smiling; I almost didn’t recognize her. Behind her were two little boys, and the friend who called 911 and greeted us at the scene. I didn’t make any attempt to talk to them, and they didn’t see me anyways.

I guess the takeaway from this story is that there are happy endings sometimes. Even though I played a very small part in her recovery, and I don’t know the true extent of her problems, I don’t think I’ll ever forget how different someone can be after a few months.

A 911 Operator Warning You to Stay Safe

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It’s kind of a running joke in my office that I always get the weirdest calls, and it’s true. One of the more interesting ones I got was from a drunk guy who meant to call the cops and was trying to file a noise complaint about his own party. While some of my calls can be pretty strange, they’re usually fairly tame. I’ve been pretty lucky because I haven’t had too many disturbing or sad stories to tell from my years working as a 911 operator. If you’re looking for something like that, I can point you to several of my colleagues because unfortunately, there’s no shortage of those in this industry.

The call that particularly sticks in my mind is one that I had about a year or two ago. I can honestly say that it’s one of the most frightening experiences of my entire life, and think it’s going to stick with me forever.

It had actually been a fairly slow afternoon that day. I know it sounds kind of insensitive, but if you’re not taking a call, this job can get pretty boring. I got stuck covering my friend’s evening shift, and I didn’t expect things to get more interesting. I was counting down the minutes until my shift ended when a call came through my line. I put the headset on and ran through the usual script.

“911, what is your emergency?” I asked.

“I think there’s someone in my house,” the voice sounded like it belonged to a young child. My heart sank. Calls from children were always the worst.

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A 911 Operator Warning You to Stay Safe
by: @alltheprompts (personal: @fbis-most-unwanted)







          It’s kind of a running joke in my office that I always get the weirdest calls, and it’s true. One of the more interesting ones I got was from a drunk guy who meant to call the cops and was trying to file a noise complaint about his own party. While some of my calls can be pretty strange, they’re usually fairly tame. I’ve been pretty lucky because I haven’t had too many disturbing or sad stories to tell from my years working as a 911 operator. If you’re looking for something like that, I can point you to several of my colleagues because unfortunately, there’s no shortage of those in this industry.

           The call that particularly sticks in my mind is one that I had about a year or two ago. I can honestly say that it’s one of the most frightening experiences of my entire life, and think it’s going to stick with me forever.

           It had actually been a fairly slow afternoon that day. I know it sounds kind of insensitive, but if you’re not taking a call, this job can get pretty boring. I got stuck covering my friend’s evening shift, and I didn’t expect things to get more interesting. I was counting down the minutes until my shift ended when a call came through my line. I put the headset on and ran through the usual script.

           “911, what is your emergency?” I asked.

           “I think there’s someone in my house,” the voice sounded like it belonged to a young child. My heart sank. Calls from children were always the worst.

           We’re trained to get as much information from each caller as possible. This makes it easier to more fully understand the situation as well as figure out which emergency services we need to dispatch.

           “What’s your name, sweetie?” I kept my voice calm and upbeat. There was no need in scaring them any further than they undoubtedly already were.

           “Elizabeth,” she said softly. I think she might have been crying.

           “That’s a beautiful name. Mine’s Amelia,” even though I didn’t show it, I was beginning to get nervous. “This is very important. Can you tell me what’s happening right now?”

           The line was quiet for a moment, but then Elizabeth started talking, “I think someone’s in my house.”

           “Where are you parents?” I asked.

           “They’re not home. I’m not sure where they are.”

           I was pretty angry when I heard this. What kind of parents leave a little girl home alone this late at night? “Is there anyone else there with you?”

           “Yeah, I think they’re looking for me,” Elizabeth began, but her voice abruptly stopped at the very end of her sentence. Had it not been for her quiet, frightened breaths, I would have thought she, or whoever else was there, hung up. “They said my name.” She was definitely crying now.

           “Where are you right now?”

           I heard a door close. “In my parents’ closet,” she spoke a little louder now, probably thinking that the intruder wouldn’t be able to hear her from in there. I hoped she was right. I was glad that she knew to hide. A lot of kids freeze up in dangerous situations like this, especially if their parents or an older sibling aren’t there.  

           I asked her for her address, which she gave to me, but for the sake of privacy I will only say that Elizabeth’s house was in a fairly nice neighborhood in my area. And it wasn’t far from the police station, which was very helpful.

           “Elizabeth, just focus on my voice. I need you to try and relax. I’m sending the police to your house right now, and they should be there in about five minutes. Can you hold on until then?” Even though I would usually try to get a little more information about the intruder, I always tend to air on the side of caution when children call 911. I’d much rather send someone and have it be a false alarm than risk their safety.

           Elizabeth did not answer my question, and it took her longer than I was comfortable with to respond. When she did, it was only one word. “Listen.” I heard the phone crackle as she brought it away from her ear and held it out in front of her.

           At first, I didn’t hear anything, but as I focused on the background noise, I noticed a lot of whispering. I couldn’t tell what they were saying, but it definitely sounded like it was coming from more than one person. I hoped the police would get there on time. As much as I help people with my job and as many lives as I’ve saved, it is always so frustrating that I can’t do anything myself other than wait and talk.

           Elizabeth’s voice came out in hushed sobs, “He’s coming up here! Please help!”

           “The police are almost there. I need you to be quiet so he doesn’t here you. You’re going to be okay, sweetie, I promise.”

           She seemed to calm down a bit.

           Everything was quiet for a moment, save for the whispering, which was much louder now. I still didn’t know what they were saying, but I was sure it was coming from multiple people. I could pick out at least three distinct voices.

           When I heard a door creak open through the phone, my heart leapt. Elizabeth screamed, and I knew that the intruders had found her. I was so scared for her, and I desperately hoped that someone would be there to help soon. “Are you okay? I need you to tell me what’s going on.” I was trying, and failing, to stop my voice from cracking. I couldn’t let her know that I was afraid.

           “There’s a man,” Elizabeth whispered. “He has really long legs and a really big smile.” My imagination was running away from me. I pictured this poor girl alone in the closet as an impossibly tall man towered over her.

           I heard another bang coming from somewhere in the house and someone yelling “Police.” Thank god.

           I could hear Elizabeth crying as the whispers intensified. I still didn’t understand how she only saw one person. There had to have been more than four!

           “He isn’t touching the floor.” The line cut off. I frantically tried to re-establish the connection, but no matter how many times I tried, I was met with only silence on the other end.

           I would like to close with a message to any parents reading this: please, please don’t leave your young children home by themselves. I haven’t heard anything about Elizabeth or her family in the year since this happened.

           The police only found the phone.

the restaurant door dings as someone enters. a few patrons glance towards it nonchalantly and see a single man enter with a determined and dangerous look in his eye. the manager happens to come out and a look of terror passes through his face as he recognizes the newcomer. “no….not you. not again.” he stammers, stepping back. the man only smiles and pulls out his phone. “back at it again at krispy kreme” he says and launches into a running backflip, smashing the krispy kreme sign in midair. a woman screams as it shatters on the ground. the man continues his frenzy, crushing tables, flipping chairs, breaking windows. children are sobbing. the manager hides behind the counter, attempting to call 911 but his fingers are shaking. the man high kicks the phone out of his hand. no one can stop him. he’s back at it again

Am I the only one annoyed at the media, especially the network news media’s practically stalking the “Children Of 9-11” every year?  Yeah, I said it, motherfuckers are STALKING these kids.

This being the 10th Anniversary especially, they are really balls to the wall with the fuckery.  

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You know shit is real when Hoda and Kathie Lee put off their Friday drankin’.

“No y'all can’t have any wine before you interview the kids.  Why? Because little kids don’t respond well to two drunk ass lushes all up in their grill, Bitch?”

Now that the kids are beyond that innocent age when kids say anything because they’re haven’t been properly brainwashed filtered on how to not say any random shit that comes to mind, these damn TV news shows are running these kids out in front of the cameras like they’re Kardashians and asking them questions like “How does 9-11 make you feel” or “Do you miss your daddy?”

How the fuck she gonna feel any kind of way about 9-11 when she was born 2 months AFTER AND SHE NEVER MET HER DAMN DADDY? 

I know, I know that they couldn’t even get at those kids without parental consent. I’m gonna be cool and now spew on those folks who would allow their kids to be pimped that way, dumb motherfuckers. Oops, anyway…

My kid wouldn’t be on somebody’s TV being asked a damn thing and I wish somebody’s parent had the balls to tell MSNBC to get the fuck out of their face if they asked.

It’s bad enough that 9-11 is about three years away from being another major sales event at Wal-Mart but this cheap flaunting of the kids to get ratings is just 

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Ex-Husband Killed Woman's 4 Kids

“Christine McFadden seemed to have it all — a great career, a beautiful home, and four terrific children.

But her world collapsed around her when she returned from her morning walk on March 26. The 44-year-old Merced, Calif., veterinarian found her ex-husband’s vehicle parked in the driveway, and the body of her daughter in the hallway. She fled to a neighbor’s house to call police.

"This is Christine McFadden. I think my ex-husband has killed my children,” McFadden said in a frantic call to 911, made available to Good Morning America.

“Talk to me. What’s going on?” the operator said.

“I don’t know. I walk in the house. I think my daughter is dead in the hallway,” McFadden said. “I left … My ex-husband is John Hogan. You need several police. He’s an ex-cop. But send someone, if they’re still alive.”

All four of her children were slain by McFadden’s ex-husband. First, Hogan, 49, killed her sons from a previous marriage, 15-year-old Stanley Willis and 14-year-old Stuart Willis. Both boys were both found shot to death in their beds. Their sister, 17-year-old Melanie Willis, struggled with Hogan in the hallway, but he killed her, too.

Hogan brought little Michelle Hogan, the only of the four who was his biological child, to the master bedroom. He shot her in the torso, and then killed himself.“

source

The neighbours of the Florida woman who fatally shot her four children and herself, refused to open the doors to three of the frantic children who had fled to their house. During a recording of a 911 call made by the neighbours on the night of the attack by Tonya Thomas, 33, a crying female caller can be heard to say, ‘Get back, you’re not coming in our house.’ The caller’s husband then grabbed the phone and told the dispatcher, 'They tried to break in our front door to get in, I guess to try and get away from her - who-ever’s got the gun.’ The neighbours made the 911 call as they responded to hearing gunfire coming from the property next door and went downstairs after their front door was knocked. 'I knew this was gonna happen you guys,’ the crying female caller told the dispatcher as the deaths of Joel, 12, Jazlin, 13, Jaxs, 15, and Pebbles Johnson, 17 unfolded in front of their eyes. 'The boy’s in our front yard - get him a towel - he’s got blood on his right side.’ During the chaotic phone call to dispatchers, the husband tells them that he is armed and willing to defend his house from the injured children trying to flee their murderous mother.

A friend and I were having a hardcore jamming sess and whilst doing so, we were listening to Skrillex ‘cause obvi. So to understand this all, you must first listen to First of the Year (Equinox). Listen to that shit here. Anyway, some guy came up to us and was all like “Is that Skrillex? Oh my gosh, I love that song.” So, said dude proceeds to show us a video in which the whole “ CALL 911″ part comes from and I legitimately fell to the floor in tears. The original video (heeere~) has got to be the best goddamn thing ever. I’m still not over it. The lady clearly need to take some chill pills. Lesson learned today here, children – call 911 now~

Instead of sleeping I am laying in bed on this stupid website worrying about these villain children.

LIKE HELLO YES 911?? DID YOU SEE DESCENDENTS? oh you don’t have kids? ME NEITHER I’M 22 NOW I’LL HOLD WHILE YOU WATCH IT AND WE CAN BECOME SLEEP DEPREIVED AND CRAZY TOGETHER.

a womans fucking children got tear gas in their eyes and 911 tells her to ‘go fuck herself’ and people still have the nerves to say they dont care. innocent black people murdered because white people cant handle difference.