the chemistry!

In case anyone was wondering, Mei’s halloween costume is called a ‘Jiangshi‘ and it’s probably one of my favorite cultural monsters. :D The Jiangshi is also known as ‘the hopping vampire’ and I first ran into it on a game called Ragnarok Online.

While often mistaken for a zombie, it is in fact a vampire (despite the fact that it’s a reanimated corpse) and is typically dressed in garments from the Qing dynasty. They move only by hopping around (hence the name) and often have their arms outstretched forward permanently, both due to rigor mortis. They also feed off of the life energy of their victims (much like Mei in overwatch), which is where the vampire comes in, although the Chinese claim that the slavic vampire had no influence on the Jiangshi.

You can stop a Jiangshi one of several ways, from apparently sucking their held breath out of them, which causes them to turn into a normal, lifeless corpse, to throwing rice and small objects in it’s path, which will force it to pick up and count each grain. (Counting vampire. Hmm..)

Originally posted by jupiter2

The weaknesses of a Jiangshi include the blood of a black dog, a wooden sword made from a peach tree, a hen’s egg, glutinous rice (by extension of its use in the attempt to draw poisons from a living body), and the urine of a virgin boy. (Yikes)

 They’re controlled by the talisman that’s placed on their heads, and like a western vampire, anyone who’s life force is drained by the Jiangshi becomes a Jiangshi themselves.

Here’s a few examples from pop culture you may recognize as a Jiangshi.

Nightwalker Heartless from Kingdom Hearts

Lee Pailong from the Shaman King manga/anime.

Hsien-Ko from the Darkstalkers fighting game.

Thanks for taking a look, I know the Jiangshi isn’t a very popular monster in western culture and I know a few people have been curious about her new Halloween Skin so I thought I’d make this post. :D

No offense but I’m glad that IT(2017) lives on to be one of the rare exceptions where the reboot is better than the original movie

The Genius of Marie Curie

Growing up in Warsaw in Russian-occupied Poland, the young Marie Curie, originally named Maria Sklodowska, was a brilliant student, but she faced some challenging barriers. As a woman, she was barred from pursuing higher education, so in an act of defiance, Marie enrolled in the Floating University, a secret institution that provided clandestine education to Polish youth. By saving money and working as a governess and tutor, she eventually was able to move to Paris to study at the reputed Sorbonne. here, Marie earned both a physics and mathematics degree surviving largely on bread and tea, and sometimes fainting from near starvation. 

In 1896, Henri Becquerel discovered that uranium spontaneously emitted a mysterious X-ray-like radiation that could interact with photographic film. Curie soon found that the element thorium emitted similar radiation. Most importantly, the strength of the radiation depended solely on the element’s quantity, and was not affected by physical or chemical changes. This led her to conclude that radiation was coming from something fundamental within the atoms of each element. The idea was radical and helped to disprove the long-standing model of atoms as indivisible objects. Next, by focusing on a super radioactive ore called pitchblende, the Curies realized that uranium alone couldn’t be creating all the radiation. So, were there other radioactive elements that might be responsible?

In 1898, they reported two new elements, polonium, named for Marie’s native Poland, and radium, the Latin word for ray. They also coined the term radioactivity along the way. By 1902, the Curies had extracted a tenth of a gram of pure radium chloride salt from several tons of pitchblende, an incredible feat at the time. Later that year, Pierre Curie and Henri Becquerel were nominated for the Nobel Prize in physics, but Marie was overlooked. Pierre took a stand in support of his wife’s well-earned recognition. And so both of the Curies and Becquerel shared the 1903 Nobel Prize, making Marie Curie the first female Nobel Laureate.

In 1911, she won yet another Nobel, this time in chemistry for her earlier discovery of radium and polonium, and her extraction and analysis of pure radium and its compounds. This made her the first, and to this date, only person to win Nobel Prizes in two different sciences. Professor Curie put her discoveries to work, changing the landscape of medical research and treatments. She opened mobile radiology units during World War I, and investigated radiation’s effects on tumors.

However, these benefits to humanity may have come at a high personal cost. Curie died in 1934 of a bone marrow disease, which many today think was caused by her radiation exposure. Marie Curie’s revolutionary research laid the groundwork for our understanding of physics and chemistry, blazing trails in oncology, technology, medicine, and nuclear physics, to name a few. For good or ill, her discoveries in radiation launched a new era, unearthing some of science’s greatest secrets.

From the TED-Ed Lesson The genius of Marie Curie - Shohini Ghose

Animation by Anna Nowakowska

listen up, kids, sky’s here to tell you something:

it’s okay to have interests that you don’t necessarily want to pursue at a higher level even if your parents think otherwise/think it isn’t ‘worth so much time’

so, you wanna write a book, but you don’t wanna get a degree in english literature? go for it! you wanna get a chemistry set and blow up some shit and learn from it, but you don’t wanna be a chemist? go the fuck ahead! you wanna figure out what the binomial theorem is at the age of thirteen, but you don’t wanna become a maths professor? by all means, knock yourself out!

you can learn from a whole range of different things, but that doesn’t mean you have to make it your life’s work or get a degree in it.

you’re young, you’re curious. try new things. dabble in different areas. it doesn’t matter if you have sixteen things you like doing, or just six. it’s all okay.