the capital cities

flickr

Tokyo Cityscape 9098 by Krzysztof Baranowski
Via Flickr:
with Nishi-Shinjuku skyline.

  • boy: falls out
  • disco: gets panicked at
  • direction: is singular
  • dragons: are imagined
  • summer: lasts five seconds
  • sirens: being slept with
  • vampires: on the weekend
  • pilot: multiplied by twenty one
  • moon: walked on
  • cities: are capital
  • authors: are american
  • monsters: of themselves and men
  • day: is green
  • my chemical romance: breaks up
flickr

Otemachi 8134 by Krzysztof Baranowski
Via Flickr:
Reflection of a golden sunset.

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Donald Trump and Women’s Marches: How 48 hours of power and protest will define the next four years

The past two days offered one of the starkest contrasts in American history. Donald Trump’s swearing-in as president attracted tons of supporters, but seemingly far fewer than Barack Obama’s first inauguration. The peaceful transfer of power to Trump was a moment of triumph to some and a sign of horror to others. The latter group coalesced into the resistance to Trump throughout the weekend.

On Friday, security forces came out in numbers, and Black Lives Matter participated in a coalition effort to disrupt the proceedings — and succeeded for a time. That protest and others set a confrontational tone that continued late into the night.

On Saturday, people turned out en masse as part of the Women’s March on Washington — an impressive feat for novice organizers. They flooded not only the nation’s capital, but cities around the world, with an estimated total of 2.5 million people not quite protesting Trump, but spurred to action under the banner of women’s rights by his election nonetheless. It was an unprecedented start to an unprecedented sort of president.

Buckle up: The Donald Trump era is here — and it has been met by what one expert says is the largest protest in American history. Read more

BERLIN FACTS

* Berlin has more bridges than Venice/Italy - between 1400 and 1700, depending on who you ask (Venice only has 409). There are over 180 km of navigable waterways.

* Berlin is the only city in the world with 3 active opera houses: the Staatsoper, the Deutsche Oper, and the Komische Oper. Opera lovers are treated to events with many of the world’s best singers, conductors, and musicians taking to the stage. If you’re under the age of 30, try the evening box office where you can pick up any unsold tickets for around 10€!

* Parks, lakes, and forests comprise around 1/3 of Berlin’s total area, so many “nature” activities such as kayaking, cycling, and hiking can be done within the urban area. 

* Berlin’s Zoologischer Garten’s zoo and aquarium gets about 3 million visitors a year. It’s considered to be the most visited zoo in Europe and one of the most popular worldwide. Regular animal feedings are among its attractions. There are 19,000 animals of 1,500 different species. The zoo collaborates with universities, research institutes, and zoos around the world. It maintains and promotes breeding programs, helps safeguard endangered species, and participates in species reintroduction programs.

* Berlin is also home to the largest department store in continental Europe. The Kaufhaus des Westens (KaDeWe) has over 60,000 sqm of display space on 8 floors. If you like gourmet foods, visit the 6th and 7th floor - they’re entirely devoted to food, adding up to the size of 2 football fields. The 6th floor “Delicatessen” is famous for its wide variety of foods and beverages. There are 110 cooks and 40 bakers and confectioners supplying 30 gourmet counters. The 7th floor includes a winter garden with a 1000-seat restaurant surrounded by an all-windowed wall offering a view over the Wittenbergplatz.

* The Berlin Wall (1961-1989) was 155 km long; it was guarded by 302 manned watchtowers. In the communist/socialist East, it was named ‘Antifaschistischer Schutzwall’ (anti-fascist protection wall), implying that it was erected to protect the East Germans against capitalist West Germany. In reality, its purpose was to stop the flood of East Germans trying to escape to the West by locking them in as prescribed by the Russian/USSR communist occupiers. Prior to 1961, 3.5 million East Germans had left, totaling about 20% of the population.

* Today, about 30% of Berlin’s population of 3 million have some kind of migrant background. About 13% are foreign nationals. As the capital, Berlin has a long history of migration, going back to 1685 when the city welcomed many protestant refugees from France, known as Huguenots. The Neukölln district has one of the largest Turkish communities in Germany.

Namie & Lulu’s Reunion Report!!!

In August 2016, Lulupu flew over to Australia to play! We did a con together, I took her around Perth, we also explored Sydney and Brisbane together!  

This reunion was successfully funded by our book, New World Aviary! Thank you to everyone that supported us! ;v; We had too much fun together!

The long report is under the cut!!

Keep reading

URUK PERIOD OF IRAQ

This is an excerpt from my post: THE SUMERIANS, FOREFATHERS OF CIVILIZATION IN MESOPOTAMIA.

The Uruk Period is named after the ancient city of Uruk, a large settlement that could sustain a population as high as 40,000-50,000. Where in the earlier periods the sizes of war-bands were only in the hundreds, they could now support armies of as much as 5,000 men. Although they were also supported by about 146 smaller settlements that lay within their domains, these villages and cities began to decrease as the inhabitants flocked to the larger capital cities for the safety of their walls and promise of a better life.

^ Uruk.

Artifacts manufactured in Uruk can be found throughout Mesopotamia, one of the primary items found is also believed to be the world‘s first mass produced object, a “bevel rimmed bowl”. Most believe that these cheaply made ordinary looking bowls were actually part of the early Sumerian currency system. With the increase of urbanization less city folk farmed, instead finding work within the cities where they would be paid in grain. How much grain one had in a bowl would determine how much one was paid (for you to eat from, save or trade with). 

An urban revolution had occurred; populations and the focus of agriculture now shifted over to the more fertile river valleys and irrigation increased the productivity and amount of crops which led to a population boom. With more cities lying beside channels and rivers there was an increase in trade and income as now they could more easily travel and connect with those along these waters. With the overall increase of food and income also came an increase in specialist professions; merchants, craftsmen, artisans, warlords, high priests, nobles and kings. 

^ A clay tablet maker and cuneiform scribe recording a cattle sale in a Sumerian market place about 3000 B.C. by Neville Dear.

Temples were now being built on a larger scale and were more numerous, priestly roles became more important as well. The en (“priest, lord”) was the high-priest, a title denoting sovereignty and the power to make things prosper. The en-priestess (Akkadian ‘entum’, Sumerian ‘Nin’) would live in a temple complex called a giparu (“storehouse”) which were in earlier times used as storage areas for the harvest and even cattle. En-priestesses were buried in a cemetery by the giparu, offerings were given to deceased priestesses and reverence to them extended to the point of there being a cult devoted to them. A common custom in Mesopotamia was to bury the diseased in the floors of the household, the same can be found in the giparu as the priestesses were also buried here. Sadly the city of Ur, the giparu and its cemetery were all looted by the Elamites late in Sumerian history.

The first and most famous of these en-priestesses was the daughter of Sargon the Great, Enheduanna (“En, ornament [ie. the moon] of the heavens”), who was the high-priestess of Nanna/Sin (moon god) and was renowned for being the first author in history, at least 42 hymns are attributed to her. The en-priestesses were also seen as the wife of their patron god therefore representing the godly wife; an example being that the Enheduanna, en-priestess of Ur, represented Ningal (goddess of reeds) the wife of Nanna/Sin (moon god). During the warring city-states period that followed, the title en would also grow to into a more militarized and authoritative position. This priest-king (Ensi, “lord [of the] plowland”) was seen as an intermediary between the gods and man. 

The lugal (“big man”) signified the owner of something and inevitably became the term for kings. The title lugal would not become prominent until c.2700 BCE, the ensi were more important than them but in time they would become seen as their subordinates. Unlike the high-priests and high-priestesses, who would be elected, the lugal’s succession would pass onto their heirs. According to some the lugals may have initially been elected as ad hoc leaders much like the consuls of Rome and the judges (shoftim) of the bible, but generally needed for military purposes.

Like the classical Greeks, the Sumerians and Akkadians may have believed that whomever won these wars, the gods favored more so. Countless tablets show both pictorial representations and written texts which depicted gods warring when it was known that kings fought these conflicts. An example of this is when Umma and Lagash were warring the texts say that Ningirsu (patron war god of Lagash) battled against Umma and “By the command of Enlil, he cast (his) big battle-net upon it, and its many tumuli (burial mounds) he laid upon the ground in the plain.” 

There was even a king of Akkad named Naram-Sin who is depicted in artwork wearing a horned helmet only worn by the gods and was deified as the god of Agade (Akkad)”. Despite the apparent supremacy the ensis and lugals held, early Mesopotamian history shows that the council (ukkin, “council, assembly”) still held sway over most important decisions; one made up of elders (abba urru, “father/elders of the city”) and one of youths. In the poem Gilgamesh and Agga even Gilgamesh, the great legendary king of Uruk, needed their permission to go to war against Aga of Kish. The elders disapproved “Let us submit to the house of Kish, let us not smite it with weapons” but the people of the city sided with Gilgamesh.

Other city states arose, like the great cities of Kish and Ur, which surpassed Uruk in importance. This transition from the Uruk period to the First Dynasty of Ur is said by some to coincide with a wet and dry period known as the Piora Oscillation which led to massive flooding (possibly inspiring the great flood myth) and drought (leading to a scramble for resources).

If there are any errors please privately inbox me so I can update it. As always, if you’d like to read or learn about any specific historical subjects just let me know what they are and I will take note of them.

See Also:

I’ll probably clean this up and add more details later but for now I think it’s ok. This is a map of One Punch Man Earth, just about as close to accurate as I can manage using various screenshots and manga pages to approximate the locations of the other land masses and the boarders of the, I guess Providences? H-P and the eastern boarders of A had to be guessed because there were no images for that side of the continent but everything else is cannon. The capital cities are also guessed aside from City Z.

This really puts into perspective how fast Genos and Saitama are considering they run to different cities and how fast the trains and other transportation would be to be able to get people between capital cities in a timely manor. Also how badass Saitama is to survive the winters where he lives.

But anyway, I’m good with anyone using this for whatever, figuring out or showing people locations in fics or just as a reference, just credit me pls (and maybe tag me because I’d certainly be interested in seeing!).