the book of lists

Books on Ted Bundy

I already had a few asks about it so I decided to put together a list of the ultimate books on Ted Bundy. It’s a work in progress, and I might add more in the future!

The Only Living Witness : The true story of serial sex killer Ted Bundy by Stephen G. Michaud & Hugh Aynesworth 

Michaud and Aynesworth are a reporter and an investigator team who interviewed serial killer Ted Bundy while he was on death row in Florida. This volume chronicles his activities throughout several states but is at its best in a long section of transcripts from the interview in which, while he never admits his quilt, Bundy offers vivid details of the crimes and commentary on the mindset of a serial killer.

The Stranger Beside Me by Ann Rule 

The Stranger Beside Me is a 1980 autobiographical and biographical true crime book written by Ann Rule about the serial killer Ted Bundy, whom she knew personally before and after his arrest for a series of murders.

Note : It’s a good book but her perception of Ted is often off base. It’s better to be read with some distance as she perpetuated some fake myths like the long parted hair in the middle, but it’s overall a good read with an interesting point of view from someone who worked with him and hanged out socially a few times with him.

Ted Bundy : Conversations with a Killer, The Death Row Interviews by Stephen G. Michaud & Hugh Aynesworth 

Drawn from more than 150 hours of exclusive tape-recorded interviews with Bundy, this collection provides shocking insights into the killer’s 11th-hour confessions before his death in a Florida electric chair. A unique, horrifying self portrait of one of the most savage sex killers in history.

The Riverman by Robert D. Keppel 

After a search of over twenty years, one of America’s most elusive serial killers was finally apprehended. Now, read the true story of one man’s attempt to get inside the mind of the Green River Killer July 15, 1982: 3 woman’s strangled body was filed, caught on the pilings of Washington state’s Green River. Before long, the “Green River Killer” would be suspected in at least forty-nine more homicides, with no end in sight. Then the authorities received an unbelievable letter from the infamous serial killer Ted Bundy – then on Florida’s death row – offering to help catch the Green River Killer. But he would only talk to one man: Robert Keppel, the former homicide detective who had helped track Bundy’s cross-county killing spree. Now these conversations are revealed, in which Bundy speculates about the motive and methods of the Green River Killer – and reveals his own twisted secrets as well. Now, as never before, we look into the face of evil … and into the heart of a killer.

The Phantom Prince : My Life with Ted Bundy by Elizabeth Kendall 

One of my personal favorite, it’s a kind of autobiography written by Elizabeth Kloepfer about her 7 years relationship with Ted. It gives the best insight on how he acted around someone close to him and on his every day life. It’s a must read! 

Defending the Devil : My story as Ted Bundy’s last lawyer by Polly Nelson 

As a brand-new lawyer, Polly Nelson was offered serial-killer Ted Bundy’s case as a pro bono project for her prestigious Washington, DC law firm just weeks before he was scheduled to be executed. Defending the Devil is a unique and candid look at the Bundy case and at Nelson’s three-year personal battle to balance her duties as a lawyer, her compassion for human life, and the inhuman crimes her client had committed.

Through the obstacles and setbacks faced by Nelson there was Ted Bundy himself. While his crimes show the extremely violent side of his personality, there were many other sides –many other extreme sides–that the public never saw. Ranging from shy and defensive to a narcissistic performer, Bundy professed his innocence by day while offering confessions to the police and helping the FBI at night. His own worst enemy, Bundy seemed never to understand the severity of his crimes, the punishment, or the public’s reaction to them. Through it all stood Nelson, defending him from both the system and himself.

I’m Not Guilty : The Case of Ted Bundy by Al Carlisle Ph.D. 

Dr. Al Carlisle evaluated Bundy for the Utah court when he was first arrested in 1975 and conducted extensive interviews with him after that. Carlisle has painstakingly reconstructed the life of Ted Bundy through conversations with his friends, family, neighbors, lovers, investigators, and surviving victims—and with the killer himself. I’M NOT GUILTY finally answers the questions about Bundy’s own crimes through a fictional dialogue between Carlisle and Bundy on the day before his execution, and sheds light on the development of the violent mind.

The Bundy Murders : A Comprehensive History by Kevin Sullivan 

Theodore Bundy was one of the more infamous, and flamboyant, American serial killers on record, and his story is a complex mix of psychopathology, criminal investigation, and the U.S. legal system. This in-depth examination of Bundy’s life and his killing spree that totaled dozens of victims is drawn from legal transcripts, correspondence and interviews with detectives and prosecutors. Using these sources, new information on several murders is unveiled. The biography follows Bundy from his broken family background to his execution in the electric chair.

The Trail of Ted Bundy : Digging up the untold stories by Kevin Sullivan 

Within the pages of The Trail of Ted Bundy : Digging Up the Untold Stories, you’ll hear the voices - many for the first time - of some of Ted Bundy’s friends, as they bring to light the secrets of what is was like to know him while he was actively involved in murder. The stories of his victims are here as well, as told by their friends, including the information and anecdotes that didn’t make it into the investigative files and are being published here for the first time. Two of the former detectives who worked with author Kevin Sullivan during the writing of his widely-acclaimed book, The Bundy Murders, return to aid readers in fully understanding Bundy’s murderous career; it’s ripple-effect impact on those who came into contact with him in one way or another, and dispelling commonly held myths.

The Trail of Ted Bundy is a journey back in time, to when Ted Bundy was killing young woman and girls in the Pacific Northwest and beyond. It’s told by those who knew him, and you’ll hear their revealing stories, many being voiced and put to print for the very first time. The friends of the victims are here as well, and they too share their insights about the victims, and some of what they tell here had been held back from the investigators, such was their commitment to their deceased friends. It’s also the story of those who hunted Bundy; those who guarded him, and those who otherwise were a part of this strange case one way or another.

The Bundy Secrets : Hidden Files on America’s Worst Serial Killer by Kevin Sullivan 

Within the pages of The Bundy Secrets : Hidden Files Of America’s Worst Serial Killer is a unique, never-before-published look at the investigations undertaken to stop the depredations of America’s most infamous serial killer, Ted Bundy. Presented here in an easy-to-follow chronology are the raw, unedited and most fascinating official case files as they appeared to the detectives from the Pacific Northwest to the Rocky Mountains to Florida. 

Ted Bundy : A Visual Timeline by Rob Dielenberg 

Ted Bundy was, and still is, an enigma. This book goes part way towards dismantling some of the mythos that has been built up around him over the 40 years since he first came to light. It does this by presenting – in chronological order – all the important available information on Ted gleaned from books, archives, TV, film, newspaper articles, essays, police reports, court transcripts, and original sources, so that readers can make up their own minds. If you are a student of abnormal psychology and/or criminology you will find this book an invaluable resource in answering most, if not all, the questions you ever wanted to ask about Ted. This book may not be the last word on him, but it is without doubt the most exhaustively researched to date.

In Defense of Denial: Ted Bundy’s Final Prison Interview 1989 

In 1989, shortly before his execution, Ted Bundy met with Robert Keppel in what would be his final confession to the events that had occurred some years prior in Washington State. Although much of this confession has been published in other forms and through various media outlets, this is the original version of that confession as provided by an FOIA request made in June of 2015. It contains more of the interview than has been discussed over the years.  It was released in transcribed form by the King County Sheriff Office.

Reflections on Green River : The letters of, and conversations with Ted Bundy, edited and compiled by Sara 

“Reflections on Green River” contains a collection of original letters written by Ted Bundy to the Green River Task Force in 1984.  It also contains the original transcriptions of the recorded interview with Ted in 1984 and in 1988.  In 1984 the interview centered on Ted Bundy’s evaluation of the Green River killings but it also discussed a suspect in the case as well and went into detail about the dump sites and Ted’s intuition that the Green River killer was moving up and down I-5 corridor possibly more than police were aware of.  Bundy also analyzed the disappearances of the women associated to the Green River Killer and those that he felt could be associated.  The 1988 interview centers around Ted’s evaluation of questionnaires related to crime being developed in Washington State as well as discussions related to serial killing.  These interviews and letters were talked of in some measure in other books but this collection is more complete than most other sources.  It is a very important text for those researching the Bundy era.

enroutetospace  asked:

Hi Ijeoma! I genuinely love love love your writings. I feel as if they just... speak to me. Could you please share some of your favourite books?

These are some I could think of quickly. Enjoy the list:

1. Create Dangerously: The immigrant Artist at Work by Edwidge Danticat

2. A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini

3. Brother, I am Dying by Edwidge Danticat

4. The Four Agreements by Miguel Ruiz

5. The Gift. Poems by Hafiz, translated by Daniel Ladinsky

6. I Know why The Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou

7. Shake loose my Skin by Sonia Sanchez

8. I Have Been a Woman by Sonia Sanchez

9. For Colored Girls who have Considered Suicide by Ntozake Shange

10. The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini

11. Bad News: Last Journalists in a Dictatorship by Anjan Sundaram.

12. James Baldwin: The Last Interview: And Other Conversations

13. The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison.

14. There was a Country by Chinua Achebe.

15. The Lion and the Jewel by Wole Soyinka.

16. The Concubine by Elechi Amadi.

17. Fela: This Bitch of a life by Moore Carlos.

18. The White Tiger by Aravind Adiga. 

19. A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Child Solider by Ishmael Beah.

20. Letter to my Daughter by Maya Angelou. 

P.S. Thank you for your kind kind words. Thank you.

NOTICE!

I’ve updated our essential readings list, There are now links to PDFs for several of the books listed and links where you can read the full list of works by certain writers. 

I’m still working on updating this list and would totally love some suggestions but I’m hoping to find ways for people to read most of these books for free. Some just won’t be possible BUT there are a ton to get you started, especially since I know many of you have been asking for book suggestions.

HERE’S THE LINK

Again it’s not finished but I’ll work on it more later this week. 

elphaba-masala  asked:

hi do you have any idea where i could find resources for learning icelandic? i've been poring over the internet and finding nothing

I actually do ^^ Here you have around 40 textbooks for icelandic.

Icelandic online  (Online Icelandic Courses made by the University of Iceland)
Cool Icelandic (a youtube channel)
Icelandic TV series which are designed for learning Icelandic
Courses entirely in Icelandic
ielanguage
Some memrise courses 
Radio
Common verbs and their conjugations
Stories to read (scroll down a bit and you will find th gigantic list for Icelandic)
More books


For movies/series i had to search a bit:

Rams + eng subs (movie)
Black angels + subs (serie)
Trapped + subs  (serie)
Jitters (movie)
Storks  (movie)

Good luck with your studies~ 

anonymous asked:

Imagine a preposterous situation that the books YOU want to exist are not the books everyone else in the world want to exist. Imagine a reality where wishes of other people who are not YOU matter. Imagine an imaginary situation where many people who aren't YOU want books about Maul and Hux, and think that YOUR list will be released first. Out of spite. Imagine that you're not the only person in the fandom.

imagine a preposterous situation where stories about women and poc are prioritized over white men! shocking, i know

anonymous asked:

Why was Peter the Great deemed controversial and could you do a book list on him pleeease

Peter is usually viewed either as great reformator or a pedantic destroyer of old Russian traditions. Take your pick. :)

On to the books!

anonymous asked:

hi! im starting out in research about Odin (bc of some cool things that have happened that have shown that he has been calling me), but im not sure where to start. do you have any advice for a beginning norse practitioner? thank u!

Hey, little love!
I do, I would suggest to any beginner Norse practitioner to read the Poetic or Prose Edda. But it’s not necessarily an easy or fun read for everyone, the Norse Myths is a quick rundown of all of the stories but keep an eye for out bias. If you the time to read the Eddas variations I would definitely read them all, this is translated archaic poetry it’s best to read them all over time to find the original meaning.
Here is a list of heathen books and authors to avoid.
Here is some information of the Ásatrú and it’s pretty user-friendly but keep in mind when reading the Ásatrú site it won’t give you nearly as much on the  Vanatru or  Rökkatru.
A good start to any god is to try and communicate with them or setting up a small altar or offering, here is a post I made that has some beginner info on Odin.
Best of wishes! Let me know if you need anything else. 💜

Hi:)
I’m looking for some internet friends or people I can write letters to.
My name’s Jil, I’m a 16 year old girl from Luxembourg. I speak luxembourgish, german, english and french fluently, even though I’ve got some difficulties with french.
I really love photography, aesthetical things, poetry and languages. I’m a huge Harry Potter and Sherlock fan, but there are way too many books I like to list them all.
My music taste variates a lot, but Lana del Rey and Ed Sheeran are my favourite musicians at the moment.
I may be a bit awkward, especially at first, because I’m pretty shy and self-conscious.
My instagram is @frauenberg_jil , feel free to contact me:)

fixx-art  asked:

What type of sketchbooks do you use :0 ?

i usE a variety of different ones, so i’m just gonna list some of my faves below

  • hand book artist journal - prob my fave? i have like 3 of these
  • catchet wire bound sketchbooks- these look cool af and i love the paper? it’s thinner then the hand book artist journal paper and doesn’t have as much texture, i prefer working with pens in this one!!
  • XL mixed media pads: good ol reliable XL, study sketchbooks and good paper
  • cresant rendr no show paper- these sketchbooks are a god send, i use them with markers, they don’t like wet media much but like, they’re made for alchohal markers. nothing bleeds through. not even to the back of the page. glorious
  • peter pauper press journals- these aren’t sketchbooks rly they’re journals but? they’re rly pretty and priced good and i enjoy doodling in them omg…

list of fave books i read before highschool (excluding the obvious like hp and pjo)

  • shug
  • waiting for normal
  • flipped
  • the entire clique series
  • the unicorn chronicles
  • SMILES TO GO
  • STARGIRL
  • eggs
  • the outsiders
  • the compound
  • aristotle and dante
  • counting by sevens
  • walk two moons!
  • iqbal
  • inside out and back again
  • that fearstreet series about the cheerleaders
  • HUGO CABARETTTTTTTT
  • a to z mysteries
  • tuck everlasting
  • moon over manifest
  • holes
  • EDWARD TULAIN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  • TALES OF DIMWOOD FOREST!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  • grounded
  • ashes
  • the age of miracles
  • all good children
Book meme

Tagged by @victorineb <3

The BBC estimates that most people will only read 6 books out of the 100 listed below. Reblog this and bold the titles you’ve read.

1 Pride and Prejudice - Jane Austen
2 Lord of the Rings - J. R. R. Tolkien
3 Jane Eyre – Charlotte Bronte
4 Harry Potter series
5 To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee
6 The Bible

7 Wuthering Heights – Emily Bronte
8 Nineteen Eighty-Four – George Orwell
9 His Dark Materials – Philip Pullman
10 Great Expectations – Charles Dickens
11 Little Women – Louisa M Alcott
12 Tess of the D’Urbervilles – Thomas Hardy
13 Catch 22 – Joseph Heller
14 Complete Works of Shakespeare
15 Rebecca – Daphne Du Maurier
16 The Hobbit – JRR Tolkien
17 Birdsong – Sebastian Faulks
18 Catcher in the Rye - J.D. Salinger
19 The Time Traveller’s Wife - Audrey Niffeneger
20 Middlemarch – George Eliot
21 Gone With The Wind – Margaret Mitchell
22 The Great Gatsby – F Scott Fitzgerald
23 Bleak House – Charles Dickens
24 War and Peace – Leo Tolstoy
25 The Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy – Douglas Adams
26 Brideshead Revisited – Evelyn Waugh
27 Crime and Punishment – Fyodor Dostoyevsky
28 Grapes of Wrath – John Steinbeck
29 Alice in Wonderland – Lewis Carroll

30 The Wind in the Willows – Kenneth Grahame
31 Anna Karenina – Leo Tolstoy
32 David Copperfield – Charles Dickens
33 Chronicles of Narnia – CS Lewis
34 Emma – Jane Austen
35 Persuasion – Jane Austen
36 The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe – CS Lewis
37 The Kite Runner - Khaled Hosseini
38 Captain Corelli’s Mandolin - Louis De Bernieres
39 Memoirs of a Geisha – Arthur Golden
40 Winnie the Pooh – AA Milne
41 Animal Farm – George Orwell
42 The Da Vinci Code – Dan Brown
43 One Hundred Years of Solitude – Gabriel Garcia Marquez
44 A Prayer for Owen Meaney – John Irving
45 The Woman in White – Wilkie Collins
46 Anne of Green Gables – LM Montgomery
47 Far From The Madding Crowd – Thomas Hardy
48 The Handmaid’s Tale – Margaret Atwood
49 Lord of the Flies – William Golding

50 Atonement – Ian McEwan
51 Life of Pi – Yann Martel
52 Dune – Frank Herbert

53 Cold Comfort Farm – Stella Gibbons
54 Sense and Sensibility – Jane Austen
55 A Suitable Boy – Vikram Seth
56 The Shadow of the Wind – Carlos Ruiz Zafon
57 A Tale Of Two Cities – Charles Dickens
58 Brave New World – Aldous Huxley
59 The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time – Mark Haddon

60 Love In The Time Of Cholera – Gabriel Garcia Marquez
61 Of Mice and Men – John Steinbeck
62 Lolita – Vladimir Nabokov
63 The Secret History – Donna Tartt
64 The Lovely Bones - Alice Sebold
65 Count of Monte Cristo – Alexandre Dumas
66 On The Road – Jack Kerouac
67 Jude the Obscure – Thomas Hardy
68 Bridget Jones’s Diary – Helen Fielding
69 Midnight’s Children – Salman Rushdie
70 Moby Dick – Herman Melville
71 Oliver Twist – Charles Dickens
72 Dracula – Bram Stoker
73 The Secret Garden – Frances Hodgson Burnett
74 Notes From A Small Island – Bill Bryson
75 Ulysses – James Joyce
76 The Bell Jar – Sylvia Plath
77 Swallows and Amazons - Arthur Ransome
78 Germinal – Emile Zola
79 Vanity Fair – William Makepeace Thackeray
80 Possession – AS Byatt
81 A Christmas Carol – Charles Dickens
82 Cloud Atlas – David Mitchell
83 The Color Purple – Alice Walker
84 The Remains of the Day – Kazuo Ishiguro
85 Madame Bovary – Gustave Flaubert
86 A Fine Balance – Rohinton Mistry
87 Charlotte’s Web – EB White
88 The Five People You Meet In Heaven – Mitch Albom
89 Adventures of Sherlock Holmes – Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
90 The Faraway Tree Collection – Enid Blyton
91 Heart of Darkness – Joseph Conrad
92 The Little Prince – Antoine De Saint-Exupery
93 The Wasp Factory – Iain Banks
94 Watership Down – Richard Adams
95 A Confederacy of Dunces – John Kennedy Toole
96 A Town Like Alice – Nevil Shute
97 The Three Musketeers – Alexandre Dumas
98 Hamlet – William Shakespeare
99 Charlie and the Chocolate Factory – Roald Dahl
100 Les Miserables – Victor Hugo

Total: 30. 

Tagging @slushiebear, @megneato, @debdastardly, @death–stranded, @diea-kierlyn, @experimentalmadness, @marsqueerianh, @fataldrum and anyone else who wants to play. 

I was tagged by @marsqueerianh

[The BBC estimates that most people will only read 6 books out of the 100 listed below. Reblog this and bold the titles you’ve read.]

1 Pride and Prejudice - Jane Austen
2 Lord of the Rings - J. R. R. Tolkien (partially)
3 Jane Eyre – Charlotte Bronte
4 Harry Potter series
5 To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee
6 The Bible (partially)
7 Wuthering Heights – Emily Bronte
8 Nineteen Eighty-Four – George Orwell
9 His Dark Materials – Philip Pullman
10 Great Expectations – Charles Dickens
11 Little Women – Louisa M Alcott
12 Tess of the D’Urbervilles – Thomas Hardy
13 Catch 22 – Joseph Heller
14 Complete Works of Shakespeare
15 Rebecca – Daphne Du Maurier
16 The Hobbit – JRR Tolkien
17 Birdsong – Sebastian Faulks
18 Catcher in the Rye - J.D. Salinger
19 The Time Traveller’s Wife - Audrey Niffeneger
20 Middlemarch – George Eliot
21 Gone With The Wind – Margaret Mitchell
22 The Great Gatsby – F Scott Fitzgerald
23 Bleak House – Charles Dickens
24 War and Peace – Leo Tolstoy
25 The Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy – Douglas Adams
26 Brideshead Revisited – Evelyn Waugh
27 Crime and Punishment – Fyodor Dostoyevsky
28 Grapes of Wrath – John Steinbeck (partially)
29 Alice in Wonderland – Lewis Carroll
30 The Wind in the Willows – Kenneth Grahame
31 Anna Karenina – Leo Tolstoy
32 David Copperfield – Charles Dickens
33 Chronicles of Narnia – CS Lewis
34 Emma – Jane Austen
35 Persuasion – Jane Austen
36 The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe – CS Lewis (partially)
37 The Kite Runner - Khaled Hosseini
38 Captain Corelli’s Mandolin - Louis De Bernieres
39 Memoirs of a Geisha – Arthur Golden
40 Winnie the Pooh – AA Milne
41 Animal Farm – George Orwell
42 The Da Vinci Code – Dan Brown
43 One Hundred Years of Solitude – Gabriel Garcia Marquez
44 A Prayer for Owen Meaney – John Irving
45 The Woman in White – Wilkie Collins
46 Anne of Green Gables – LM Montgomery
47 Far From The Madding Crowd – Thomas Hardy
48 The Handmaid’s Tale – Margaret Atwood
49 Lord of the Flies – William Golding (partially)
50 Atonement – Ian McEwan
51 Life of Pi – Yann Martel
52 Dune – Frank Herbert
53 Cold Comfort Farm – Stella Gibbons
54 Sense and Sensibility – Jane Austen
55 A Suitable Boy – Vikram Seth
56 The Shadow of the Wind – Carlos Ruiz Zafon
57 A Tale Of Two Cities – Charles Dickens
58 Brave New World – Aldous Huxley
59 The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time – Mark Haddon
60 Love In The Time Of Cholera – Gabriel Garcia Marquez
61 Of Mice and Men – John Steinbeck
62 Lolita – Vladimir Nabokov
63 The Secret History – Donna Tartt
64 The Lovely Bones - Alice Sebold
65 Count of Monte Cristo – Alexandre Dumas (partially)
66 On The Road – Jack Kerouac
67 Jude the Obscure – Thomas Hardy
68 Bridget Jones’s Diary – Helen Fielding
69 Midnight’s Children – Salman Rushdie
70 Moby Dick – Herman Melville
71 Oliver Twist – Charles Dickens
72 Dracula – Bram Stoker (partially)
73 The Secret Garden – Frances Hodgson Burnett
74 Notes From A Small Island – Bill Bryson
75 Ulysses – James Joyce
76 The Bell Jar – Sylvia Plath
77 Swallows and Amazons - Arthur Ransome
78 Germinal – Emile Zola
79 Vanity Fair – William Makepeace Thackeray
80 Possession – AS Byatt
81 A Christmas Carol – Charles Dickens (partially)
82 Cloud Atlas – David Mitchell
83 The Color Purple – Alice Walker
84 The Remains of the Day – Kazuo Ishiguro
85 Madame Bovary – Gustave Flaubert
86 A Fine Balance – Rohinton Mistry
87 Charlotte’s Web – EB White
88 The Five People You Meet In Heaven – Mitch Albom
89 Adventures of Sherlock Holmes – Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (partially)
90 The Faraway Tree Collection – Enid Blyton
91 Heart of Darkness – Joseph Conrad
92 The Little Prince – Antoine De Saint-Exupery
93 The Wasp Factory – Iain Banks
94 Watership Down – Richard Adams
95 A Confederacy of Dunces – John Kennedy Toole
96 A Town Like Alice – Nevil Shute
97 The Three Musketeers – Alexandre Dumas (partially)
98 Hamlet – William Shakespeare
99 Charlie and the Chocolate Factory – Roald Dahl
100 Les Miserables – Victor Hugo (partially)

10 books – 21 if you count the books I’ve read parts of, but have not finished. I’m not a big reader at all, and most of these books aren’t my style anyways.

I tag @phillipsheabutter, @gizmobot, @victoriavandal

The BBC estimates that most people will only read 6 books out of the 100 listed below. Bold the titles you’ve read.

I wasn’t tagged but it looked interesting :) I saw it on @cathawayinspace ’s blog

1 Pride and Prejudice - Jane Austen.2 Lord of the Rings - J. R. R. Tolkien.3 Jane Eyre – Charlotte Bronte.4 Harry Potter series.5 To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee.6 The Bible.7 Wuthering Heights – Emily Bronte.8 Nineteen Eighty Four – George Orwell.9 His Dark Materials – Philip Pullman.10 Great Expectations – Charles Dickens.11 Little Women – Louisa May Alcott.12 Tess of the D’Urbervilles – Thomas Hardy.13 Catch 22 – Joseph Heller.14 Complete Works of Shakespeare.15 Rebecca – Daphne Du Maurie.16 The Hobbit – J. R. R. Tolkien.17 Birdsong – Sebastian Faulks.18 Catcher in the Rye.19 The Time Traveller’s Wife - Audrey Niffenege.20 Middlemarch – George Eliot.21 Gone With The Wind – Margaret Mitchell.22 The Great Gatsby – F Scott Fitzgerald.23 Bleak House – Charles Dickens.24 War and Peace – Leo Tolstoy.25 The Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy – Douglas Adams.26 Brideshead Revisited – Evelyn Waugh.27 Crime and Punishment – Fyodor Dostoyevsky.28 Grapes of Wrath – John Steinbeck.29 Alice in Wonderland – Lewis Carroll.30 The Wind in the Willows – Kenneth Grahame.31 Anna Karenina – Leo Tolstoy.32 David Copperfield – Charles Dickens.33 Chronicles of Narnia – CS Lewis.34 Emma – Jane Austen.35 Persuasion – Jane Austen.36 The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe – CS Lewis.37 The Kite Runner - Khaled Hosseini.38 Captain Corelli’s Mandolin - Louis De Bernieres.39 Memoirs of a Geisha – Arthur Golden.40 Winnie the Pooh – AA Milne.41 Animal Farm – George Orwel.42 The Da Vinci Code – Dan Brown.43 One Hundred Years of Solitude – Gabriel Garcia Marquez.44 A Prayer for Owen Meaney – John Irving.45 The Woman in White – Wilkie Collins.46 Anne of Green Gables – LM Montgomery.47 Far From The Madding Crowd – Thomas Hardy.48 The Handmaid’s Tale – Margaret Atwood.49 Lord of the Flies – William Golding.50 Atonement – Ian McEwan.51 Life of Pi – Yann Martel.52 Dune – Frank Herbert.53 Cold Comfort Farm – Stella Gibbons.54 Sense and Sensibility – Jane Austen.55 A Suitable Boy – Vikram Seth.56 The Shadow of the Wind – Carlos Ruiz Zafon.57 A Tale Of Two Cities – Charles Dickens.58 Brave New World – Aldous Huxley.59 The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time – Mark Haddon.60 Love In The Time Of Cholera – Gabriel Garcia Marquez.61 Of Mice and Men – John Steinbeck.62 Lolita – Vladimir Nabokov.63 The Secret History – Donna Tartt.64 The Lovely Bones - Alice Sebold.65 Count of Monte Cristo – Alexandre Dumas.66 On The Road – Jack Kerouac.67 Jude the Obscure – Thomas Hardy.68 Bridget Jones’s Diary – Helen Fielding.69 Midnight’s Children – Salman Rushdie.70 Moby Dick – Herman Melville.71 Oliver Twist – Charles Dickens.72 Dracula – Bram Stoker73 The Secret Garden – Frances Hodgson Burnett.74 Notes From A Small Island – Bill Bryson.75 Ulysses – James Joyce.76 The Bell Jar – Sylvia Plath.77 Swallows and Amazons - Arthur Ransome.78 Germinal – Emile Zola.79 Vanity Fair – William Makepeace Thackeray.80 Possession – AS Byatt.81 A Christmas Carol – Charles Dickens.82 Cloud Atlas – David Mitchel.83 The Color Purple – Alice Walker.84 The Remains of the Day – Kazuo Ishiguro.85 Madame Bovary – Gustave Flaubert.86 A Fine Balance – Rohinton Mistry.87 Charlotte’s Web – EB White.88 The Five People You Meet In Heaven – Mitch Albom.89 Adventures of Sherlock Holmes – Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.90 The Faraway Tree Collection – Enid Blyton.91 Heart of Darkness – Joseph Conrad.92 The Little Prince – Antoine De Saint-Exupery.93 The Wasp Factory – Iain Banks.94 Watership Down – Richard Adams.95 A Confederacy of Dunces – John Kennedy Toole.96 A Town Like Alice – Nevil Shute97 The Three Musketeers – Alexandre Dumas.98 Hamlet – William Shakespeare.99 Charlie and the Chocolate Factory – Roald Dahl.100 Les Miserables – Victor Hugo

wow I feel like there are more books I need to read. I was annoyed cause like none of the Shakespeare books I’ve read were on there lol

5 things tag / from @citruskwan

i freaking love her blog (i secretly stalk her lols)

aaaayyy 700 followers ayyyyyy

thanks ya’ll even if i post shit and stuff

5 Things You’ll Find in my Bag

  1. a book (atm the seventh day)
  2. my wallet
  3. a matte lipstick
  4. fringe roller 
  5. a watter bottle wow much exciting

5 Things You’ll Find in my Bedroom

  1. my seal ( meerdock )
  2. a guitar
  3. an unhealthy collection of fluffy sweaters
  4. a keyboard 
  5. a black and white double chinned shownu in din a4 on my wall

5 Things I Always Wanted to do in Life

  1. get a cat
  2. meet bts or any other kpop band i stan
  3. practice my dream job
  4. own an appartment
  5. visit tokyo, seoul, and manila

5 Things I’m Currently Into

  1. watching my unfinished series
  2. making fmvs ( improving my editing skills)
  3. photography
  4. taking care of flowers
  5. googling my perfect pet a day before my exam

5 Things on my To-Do List

  1. read 12 books this year
  2. study turkish
  3. dye my hair blond?
  4. study more
  5. figure out what major i want

5 Things People May Not Know About Me

  1. I speak 6 languages lol but like really medicore
  2. I have no idea what to major in. I feel kinda lost atm everything seems like a blur and im constanly afraid to choose the wrong one
  3. I kill every single plant I buy blackthumb
  4. Im from germany but i was born in the Philippines
  5. I suffer from a severe case of overthinking

tagging: @wonwoo-cheeseburger / @woozioppa/  @diamond-encrusted-sebongies / @soft-serve-scoups / @scoups-tas-tu /// Thanks for tagging @citruseungkwan/// You dont have to do the tag but id like to see yours :) so tag meeeeeeeee

Ten things to do in 2017:

1. Take it a day at a time. You don’t have to know what you’re doing the next day or even the next hour. I’ve learned that the more you think in the future, the shorter the day seems and the months fly past you and you’re left feeling discontent and unsatisfied. It’s almost like everything has been in a blur, and you find yourself saying, “the year went by so fast”, even though you haven’t accomplished much. So do everything in the moment of ‘now’, and cherish each minute like it’s the last minute you have.

2. Let it go. You know nothing is going to change, because you can’t change people unless they truly want to and you can’t change the past either, and the sooner you realize this, you will spend more time being happy than in a constant battle with your mind and your heart. They need to rest too.

3. Take risks. If you never take any, the moment that turned out for the worst could have turned out for the best. This works vice-versa as well, but either way, you will learn from these experiences. You won’t forget how rapidly your heart was beating in these moments and how electric you felt. It will be worth it in the end, trust me.

4. Call up that person that you didn’t spend enough time getting to know, simply because you were too distracted with somebody else or just didn’t feel like you’d become something more than acquaintances. Greet strangers and embrace the idea of diversity. Ask questions about different cultures, morals, ideas, beliefs; educate yourself as much as you can.

5. Go ahead and wear that outfit you keep telling yourself that it doesn’t look good on you. You bought it because you liked it, yes? So, show it to the whole damn world. If you do it with a smile and confidently squared shoulders—even better. You are beautiful.

6. Instead of procrastinating and wallowing in self-pity, get up and do something. Sitting around is not going to do much but make you feel horrible, and you’ll create scenarios that may not even exist or be as big in your head that will cause matters to become worse. You want this to be your year of explosive progress? Set goals and strive to achieve them. You want to look back at the end of the year and say, “I did good”.

7. Spend more time with your family or friends. Build a support system so strong, that you will never feel lonely. In fact, this support system will lead you to feeling content even when you are alone, because you won’t feel the constant need to either be with someone or have somebody who loves you, because you know you’ll have people who love you and the more love you surround yourself with, the easier it becomes to love yourself too.

8. Be kind always and be angry when you need to be. Stand up for the ideas that you believe in and don’t back down from them just because you have a different opinion. Learn to love the sound of your voice when it bounces off the walls of a classroom full of people, because your voice has the power to change a million minds. Remember, you are allowed to feel whatever it is you feel.

9. Go on more road trips or just take a few minutes to be outside by yourself. Inhale and exhale the air around you. Watch the stars, the sunset, the sunrise, the birds flying in the sky, the cars passing by. Walk in the rain sometimes without an umbrella, instead of running. Let the sunlight soak your skin more often. God, isn’t the world itself beautiful?

10. Be faithful. This is the year you hoped to be better. Don’t let anything stop you from achieving that, because you are limitless as long as you believe yourself to be.

—  Ten things to do in 2017