Daily Bible Verse; October 21, 2017

For thus says the Lord, “Behold, I extend peace to her like a river,
And the glory of the nations like an overflowing stream;
And you will be nursed, you will be carried on the hip and fondled on the knees.
“As one whom his mother comforts, so I will comfort you;
And you will be comforted in Jerusalem.”
Then you will see this, and your heart will be glad,
And your bones will flourish like the new grass;
And the hand of the Lord will be made known to His servants,
But He will be indignant toward His enemies.
For behold, the Lord will come in fire
And His chariots like the whirlwind,
To render His anger with fury,
And His rebuke with flames of fire.
For the Lord will execute judgment by fire
And by His sword on all flesh,
And those slain by the Lord will be many.

(Isaiah 66:12-16)

Western Mythic/Literary Archetypes Associated with the Signs

Aries—Ares, Athena, Adam, Lilith, Samson, Lancelot, Xena

Taurus—Narcissus, Adonis, Io, Edenic Eve, Snow White, The Evil Queen, Isis, Theseus, Edenic Adam

Gemini—Hermes, Castor & Pollux, Cain & Abel, Puck, Eris, Juliet, Peter Pan, Robin Hood, Enlightened Eve, Tinkerbell

Cancer—Greek Noah, Themis, Osiris, Selene, Heracles, Biblical Noah, Pinocchio, Cinderella, Derceto, The Fairy Godmother

Leo—Helios, Ra, Artemis, Hestia, Solomon, David, Morgain, Bathsheba, St. Genevieve, Tom Sawyer, Arthur Pendragon, Dorothy

Virgo—Prometheus, Hephaestus, Hermes, Demeter, Pandora, Cain, Mary Magdalene, Wendy

Libra—Apollo, Aphrodite, The Fates/Muses/Furies, Lucifer, Medea, Circe, Astraea, Ishtar

Scorpio—Hades, Satan, Persephone, The Sphinx, The Beast, Alice

Sagittarius—Zeus, Dionysus, Hera, Lady Godiva, Huckleberry Finn, Jane Eyre

Capricorn—Cronus, Pan, Rhea, Azazel, Moses, Titania, Mother Goose

Aquarius—Uranus, Ganymede, Hebe, Eos, John the Baptist, Merlin, Salome, St. Ambrose

Pisces—Eros, Aphrodite, Poseidon, Amphitrite, Jesus Christ, Mary, The Muses, Ondine, Uncle Tom

It is essential to be alone with God, waiting at His door, hearkening for His voice, lingering in the Scripture. No number of Christian meetings, no amount of Christian activity, can compensate for the neglect of this still hour.”
The life around us, in this age, is preeminently one of rush and effort. It is the age of the instant this and instant that.” This feverish haste threatens the life of devotion to Christ… We must beware that we do not substitute Christian activities for the authentic relationship with Christ. Mary understood this and chose to be at Jesus’ feet.
There is only one thing worth being concerned about. Mary has discovered it, and it will not be taken away from her.“ Luke 10:42

Decoding the Biblical Narrative of Mother!

As I left the theater Friday night after the showing of Darren Aronofsky’s Mother!, an older woman turned to me, looking as baffled as I was, and said, “Well, we got through it.”  It was an understandable sentiment.  The movie is bizarre and overwrought and disturbing.  It makes no attempt to explain itself.  Aronofsky puts a lot of faith in the audience to put in the effort to decode it.  I suspect there will be two types of viewers of this film: those who leave the theater confused and kind of peeved and write the movie off as a forgettable romp in narcissistic arthouse theater; and those who become infected by the film’s sheer mystery.  

If I’m being totally honest, I must say that I pretty much gave up on decoding Mother! a few hours after seeing it.  I suspected it was saying something about the life of the artist and its inherent selfishness, but my interpretation was murky at best.  And then, as luck would have it, as I laid down to sleep, it hit me, seemingly at once: the whole film is an incredibly compressed retelling of the Bible.  Or, at the very least, its action mirrors that of the Bible.  

What follows is a rough attempt to break down how key scenes in Mother! reflect stories of the Bible, which hopefully will help foster a greater understanding of the movie’s central themes of creation, destruction, neglect, and obsession.    

As you could have guessed, Javier Bardem’s character represents God, although he is far from benevolent.  In my opinion, Jennifer Lawrence’s character represents a kind of Mother Nature figure. She is the one working on the house, which symbolically represents the earth, and she loves her work.  She is the one creating the physical beauty of the world, and she wants the chance to enjoy it.  But before she gets a chance, a stranger (Ed Harris) enters her world.  This stranger is Adam, the first man.  Bardem welcomes Adam into his home, who turns out to be a huge fan of Bardem’s poetry—in fact, Adam nearly worships him.  Bardem gives Adam a tour of his office, where he shows Adam his weird glowing crystal.  Adam is drawn to it and reaches to touch it, but Bardem forbids him to (forbid being the operative word here if you catch my meaning).  That night Mother finds Bardem comforting Adam as he vomits into the toilet.  She catches a brief glimpse of a wound on his rib cage which Bardem quickly covers with his hand. The next day, Eve arrives, having been fashioned out of Adam’s rib during the night.  

Now there’s that scene with the toilet. Mother discovers a strange, um, organism hanging out in it that quickly vanishes down the drain.  I cannot say with any certainty, but I believe this creature might be the serpent that tempts Eve.  We don’t see it again, so the temptation itself must take place offscreen, but nonetheless, this scene is an unsettling hint at the corruption to come. Soon after, Adam and Eve are found in Bardem’s office, where they have touched and shattered his glowing crystal.  Bardem with all the fury of the Old-Testament God banishes them from the office and boards it up, just as God banishes Adam and Eve from Eden and hides the Tree of Life.  By the way, the Tree of Life in the Bible is the source of eternal life; in Mother! the crystal is what allows Bardem to reset time and seemingly live forever.

Enter Cain and Abel, who quickly play out their murder scene, but with a doorknob as the weapon of choice instead of a rock. I believe it is after this scene (but a re-watch is required to validate this) that we first see the “heart of the house” show signs of corruption.  The fall of Adam and Eve along with this first act of violence pave the way for the film’s staggering and increasingly fanatic third act.  I’d say it begins during the wake sequence after the sink falls apart and water rains down from the heavens—excuse me, I mean sprays out from the pipes—resulting in a Great Flood that finally gets Bardem to kick his unruly houseguests out.  

Then Mother gets pregnant and Bardem publishes a best-selling book of verse.  The press shows up at his house, along with pretty much the rest of the world, and all hell gradually breaks loose.  The guests worship Bardem and greedily grab whatever they can find of his to worship as, you guessed it, idols.  Sin wreaks havoc and the house goes full-on Sodom.  The imagery that follows is so densely packed that I can’t pretend to have caught it all, but I imagine all sorts of Biblical allusions find their way into the scene.  

Mother is on the verge of giving birth and Bardem helps her find a quiet place to do so. The guests send in gifts, and while there aren’t any stand-ins for the three kings, you get the picture: its Jesus, folks.  Bardem’s first thought is that he must show his followers his son, and when he does, they hastily devour him.  After witnessing this, Bardem comes to a very Christ-like conclusion:  “His death must not have been for nothing,” he tells Mother. “We must forgive them.”  This he says, by the way, while his followers are still chewing on his newborn baby’s flesh.  Communion anyone?

 Finally, Mother cracks and sets the house ablaze in a giant ball of fire, not unlike the kind God rains down on Sodom in the OT. An unscathed Bardem walks out of the ashes holding a well-burnt but still breathing Mother, rips her heart out of her chest, and uncovers a new glowing crystal inside, which he uses to reset time to live out the events again but with a brand-new Mother.

Whew.

That’s, at least, how the plot mirrors the Bible. I didn’t touch on what these parallels do for the film’s thematic material, but I’m too exhausted to delve into that right now.  In short, Aronofsky tells the untold story of the neglected Mother behind creation, which is also the story of the neglected muse behind the artist.  That’s a whole different post, though, and hopefully, I’ll get to it soon.


Seek first His kingdom and His righteousness, and all these things will be given to you as well.
Matthew 6:33
PRAYER: Holy Lord, only in You do I find what satisfies my soul’s desires. The things that have captured my eye become stale after only a short while. The artificial things I have pursued, all of my addictive pursuits, have left me empty and enslaved. I find hope and help only in You. Please be near to love, correct, discipline lead, and mould me to Your glory. In Jesus’ name I pray. Amen.

Well, let’s see, there’s “You shall not kill,” and-

Wrong already. For starters, “You shall not kill” is a mistranslation – the original Hebrew phrase means “You shall not murder.” Legal justification marks a big difference between the two. Which makes a little more sense, since about half the Bible features impaling, mauling, and stabbing people on the toilet.

We generally perceive the commandments to be listed in order of importance, and that makes sense, too: Murder is usually considered a bigger deal than shoplifting, or coveting. But that’s not accurate either. In the Bible, the commandments were never listed in a clear manner from one to ten, leading the different religions (and the different subsections within the religions) to interpret the list differently from one another.

In the Protestant version, the first commandment is “You shall have no other gods before me,” while the Jewish version interprets that as part of the second commandment. In the Catholic version, “You shall not commit adultery” is the sixth commandment, while in the Protestant version it’s the seventh. Oh, also – “don’t murder” isn’t number one. On any list. It’s not even close.

Thou Shalt Maybe Kill: 5 Bible Facts Everyone Gets Wrong