the benefits of exercise

Today I found my sister working out and was confused as to why. She’s only 14 and should be mixing weird ice cream flavors and going to hang out with friends not doing yoga and 10 minute intense ab workouts. So i asked her why she was exercising and she replies ‘to get in shape’. I was a little upset by this because shes only 14, why should she worry about body image? Shes already thin so i was worried she was harming herself.

Before i gave her the ‘society’s expectations for the physical appearance of women is bullshit’ speech i asked why
And do you know what she said?

“I wanna kick ass”

She wasnt working out to get the perfect summer bod, she was working out to fucking KICK ASS. She said that she wanted to learn martial arts n shit but first she wanted to punch like a hard ass and impress everyone with her muscles

And i was so damn shocked. Now all it seems girls work out for is an hourglass figure and a flat stomach but no, this 14 year old just wants to be strong enough to kickass.
Society tells us that our bodies have to be this perfect replica of friggin Jessica Rabbit. It tells us that the only reason we should work out is to get skinny. It tells us that girls with more weight than others need to diet and jog 5 km a day.
Why?
Why should we as women exercise and diet to get the perfect, skinny hourglass body, big butt, and big boobs figure to please men and society??
If we’re going to exercise shouldn’t it be for our OWN benefit? To kick ass? To feel strong, confident and pretty?
Instead of pretending to know what gluten is and hating our bodies, shouldn’t we love them?
Ladies, if you’re going to exercise and diet do it because you want to, not because of unrealistic body portrayals of women.
Do it because you love yourself
Do it to become strong
Do to to become confident
Do it because you want to show off your muscles
Do it like a girl, like a 14 year old girl.

Do it because you wanna kick ass.

Artemis Fowl II is honestly one of the most relatable characters ever

because in literally every book of the series he’s like “wow I should exercise more… why did I not exercise before I started doing all of this running and jumping??… I NEED to work out… crap the only thing I’ve lifted in the past 12 years is my phone HELP ME… as I run to my death, I think of all the various reasons why working out would benefit me… Butler I promise I will exercise after this pls just let me survive”

but then over the course of EIGHT ENTIRE BOOKS he never actually manages to work out once, and if that’s not some A+ self-destructive procrastination then I don’t know what is

Day to Day

Take good notes. 

  • Always take the notes for a particular class in the same notebook. Spiral bound notebooks were invented because they solved the problem of keeping related information consolidated in one place. Take advantage of this.
  • Date each entry into your notebook.
  • It is usually best to keep the notes for different classes separate from each other. Spiral notebooks with built in dividers are excellent for this purpose.
  • Your notes should contain as complete a record of what the instructor said as possible. Of course, you should not try to write every word spoken, but don’t leave out ideas. When you study, your notes should call back to your mind the entire sequence of ideas presented. Take care to spell all new words carefully. It you don’t know how to spell a word, ask your instructor to write it on the board. Most will automatically do so for new or difficult terms.
  • Anything the instructor writes on the board should appear in your notes. If the instructor took the time to write it out, he or she considers it important. You should do the same.
  • If possible, try to take your notes in some kind of outline form. The organization of ideas is as important as the content of those ideas, especially when it comes to learning the material for an exam.
  • You might find it useful to have a second color of pen or pencil available for highlighting important ideas or indicating vocabulary.

Be involved in your classes. 

Don’t simply pretend you are a sponge, ready to soak up whatever the instructor says. You are there to learn, not to be taught.

  • If the instructor is moving too rapidly for you, or if you don’t understand what is being said, say something!
  • Ask questions if you are confused. Confusion is definitely your worst enemy.
  • If your class includes group activities, participate as fully as you can. Such exercises are done for your benefit, not to provide a break for the instructor.

Review your notes every day. 

This suggestion is one which we have all heard a thousand times. Unfortunately, most of us never really believe it until we actually try it. Spend 30 minutes or so each evening going over the notes from each class. There are at least two tremendous benefits to be gained from this discipline.

  • Research has shown that reviewing new material within 24 hours of hearing it increases your retention of that material by about 60%. This means that you will be 60% ahead of the game the next time you walk into class. If you want to significantly reduce the time necessary to prepare for exams, this is the way to do it.
  • Reviewing material before the next class period enables you to identify points of confusion or omission in your notes, which prepares you to ask the questions you need to ask before the next lecture. Again, confusion is your worst enemy.

It is excellent policy to give high priority to new vocabulary. Language is the most fundamental tool of any subject, and it can seriously handicap you to fall behind in this.

Keep up on your reading. 

Unlike most high school teachers, many college instructors don’t give specific reading assignments. You are expected to go to your text for the reading related to the materials covered in class. Be independent enough to do this without being told.

Using Your Textbook

Don’t expect your instructor to give you detailed, page by page textbook assignments. While some may do so, many do not. College teachers are much more likely to expect you to use your own initiative in making use of the text.

In most cases, it will be most useful for you to at least skim the relevant chapters before each lecture. You should receive a course outline/syllabus at the beginning of the quarter, which will tell you the subject for each day. You may receive chapter references (or even page references), or you instructor may expect you to be perceptive enough to refer to the Table of Contents.

  • When you first approach a chapter, page through it fairly quickly, noting boldface headings and subheadings, examining figures, illustrations, charts, etc., and thinking about any highlighted vocabulary terms and concepts. Also take note of the pedagogical aids at the end of the chapter–study questions, summary, etc.
  • When you have finished surveying the chapter, return to the beginning and read in more detail. Remember to concentrate upon understanding. Don’t simply read through the words. Any words which you don’t understand you should look up. If you own the book and intend to keep it, you may want to write definitions of such words in the margins. You may also find it helpful to make observations and other useful notes in the margins. If you don’t intend to keep the book yourself, you should carry out similar activities on a page in your class notebook.
  • On this first trip through the chapter, you should concentrate upon catching the major subjects and points of the material. Also take note of those things which you don’t understand. If the lecture on the material doesn’t clarify those points, you should ask your instructor to explain.

Following coverage of the chapter’s material in class, you should go back to the book and read it again. It will probably be helpful to skim through it first, as you did when you first looked at it. The tables and figures should be more readily read in detail. If you are a truly conscientious student, you will outline the chapter and prepare a vocabulary list of the terms which are pertinent.

At this time you should think seriously about the review and study questions at the end of the chapter. Do your best to answer all of them as if they were a take-home exam.

You may also want to develop a system of cross referencing symbols to use when comparing your class notes to your notes from the text.

Remember that your instructor will probably not use the same words which you find in the text book. nothing is more frustrating than to discover that what you hear in class is no more than a rehash of what you read in the book. However, if your instructor knows his/her subject, and the author of your text knows his/her subject, the meat of what they say should be the same. 

NOTE: Nobody is infallible. Your instructor may make mistakes. Don’t expect them to be more than human.

Preparing Assignments

Here’s another thing we have all been told thousands of times: Don’t leave assignments until the day before they are due! If you have a paper to write or a lab report to prepare, begin it as soon as possible. In most cases, instructors will be delighted to receive work early. Remember that many papers or projects require quite a bit of research before you can even begin writing. In most cases, it is impossible to accomplish the necessary preparation in one day or even one week. In some cases, instructors won’t accept late work at all. They are perfectly justified.

Another sore point: Be aware of the appearance of the work you submit. You should want to be proud of every assignment you submit, and that includes being proud of its appearance. If possible, assignments should always be typed. Never turn in an assignment written in pencil. Pages torn out of notebooks are sloppy and unsightly.Think about this point every time you hand an instructor an assignment. That paper represents the quality of your work, and your instructor is perfectly justified in taking its appearance into consideration when assigning a grade.

Preparing for Exams

Keep in mind that you want to be an active learner, not a passive one. The more you use and manipulate the information, the better you will understand it. Using and manipulating information in as many ways as possible also maximizes your ability to access your memory.

Do not wait until the night before an exam to study! Of course, you should be regularly reviewing your notes, but the preparation still takes time.

If your instructor hasn’t explained to you how he or she designs exams, ask. this is a perfectly legitimate concern. However, keep in mind that an instructor has the right to design exams in whatever fashion he or she sees fit, and in most cases you have no business asking for changes in that design. You need to learn to handle all testing styles–including the dreaded essay exam!

A good first step in preparation is to read through your notes a couple of times. While you are doing this, you might also;

  • Highlight major topics and subtopics, with the goal of generating an outline of your notes. Even if you take your notes in outline form, this is a good practice. Major topics often extend through more than one day’s lecture, and it is easy to lose track of the overall picture from day to day.
  • With a second color, highlight all vocabulary terms.

Outline the entire set of notes. When you study a large body of information, you should study from concept to detail, not the other way around. It will, in fact, be much easier to learn the details if you take the time to learn the concept and theory first. The least efficient approach to studying is to attempt to memorize your notes from beginning to end. It’s not the words which are important–it’s the ideas.

Consider ways of dealing with the information other than those used in class. the more ways you can manipulate and experience the material you are trying to learn, the more secure your understanding and memory will be. Some suggestions:

  • Make charts, diagrams and graphs.
  • Make lists.
  • If the subject matter includes structures, practice drawing those structures. Remember that a drawing is useless unless the important structures are labeled.

There are almost always types of information which you will have to memorize (eg. vocabulary). No one has ever invented a better device for memorizing than flash cards.

One of the most universally effective ways to polish off your study activities is to prepare a self test.

  • Challenge yourself as severely as you can.
  • As you are studying, keep a running collection of “exam questions.” If you seriously attempt to write difficult and meaningful questions, by the time you finish you will have created a formidable exam. When you begin to feel you’re ready for your instructor’s exam, take out your questions and see if you can answer them. If you can’t, you may need to go back and reinforce some of the things your are trying to learn.

Never, ever pull an “All-Nighter" on the night before an exam. This is a "freshman trick,” meaning that good students learn very quickly that it is futile. What you may gain from extra study time won’t compensate for the loss of alertness and ability to concentrate due to lack of sleep.

On exam day:

  • Try not to “cram” during every spare moment before an exam. This only increases the feeling of desperation which leads to panic, and then to test anxiety. You may find it useful, on the night before an exam, to jot down a few ideas or facts which you wish to have fresh in your mind when you begin the exam. Read through your list a couple of times when you get up in the morning and/or just before you take the exam, then put it away. This kind of memory reinforcement not only improves your performance on the test, it also improves your long-term memory of the material.
  • Be physically prepared.
    • Get a good night’s sleep.
    • Bring necessary writing materials to the test–at least 2 writing tools, erasers, blue books if necessary, calculators if appropriate and allowed. Be aware of what the instructor has specified as permitted for use. Some instructors object to exams written pencil; some prohibit use of tools like calculators. It is your responsibility to know these requirements; you should be prepared to take the consequences if you don’t.
    • This may seem silly, but go to the bathroom just before the exam. Don’t expect your teacher to let you leave to do this during the test! The tension which generally goes along with taking an exam may increase the need to perform this physical activity, so you may need to go, even though you don’t particularly feel like it.

Some Final Suggestions

You should receive a syllabus for each class. This is the Rule Book for that class (in my classes, we call it the Survival Manual). Know everything on that syllabus! Your teacher has the right to expect you to know and abide by any rules and stipulations on that document, and it is perfectly within his/her rights to penalize you for failing to do so. Respect dates and deadlines, and expect to lose points if you turn things in late.

Never miss an exam if you can help it. You will rarely be more ready for the exam in two or three days than you are on the scheduled date, and the annoyance the teacher will feel about having to arrange a special exam time for you can actually hurt your grade in the end. Miss exams only if you absolutely have to.

Save everything. Never throw away a handout or a returned assignment or exam. With this in mind, equip yourself with a pouched folder for each class.

Develop systematic behavior patterns associated with your schoolwork.

  • Keep your class materials together and neat.
  • Never allow yourself to be caught at school without the necessary notebooks and materials. If you develop systematic habits with respect to attending classes, etc., this will be no problem.

It is excellent practice to set aside a study area at home, and to designate a particular span of time each day as study time. However, don’t fall into the trap of feeling that study should never exceed the preordained time limits. You put in as much study time as is necessary to master the material for your classes.

In these 15 cities, exercising outside is actually bad for you because of air pollution

A new report from the Guardianpart of an ongoing series about air pollution — uses pollution numbers from the World Health Organization from May 2016 to identify at least 15 cities around the world that have pollution levels so high that biking outdoors becomes dangerous after just an hour or less of exposure.

Cyclists hit the tipping point into danger after an hour outside in these cities:

  • Kanpur, India
  • Shijiazhuang, China
  • Dammam, Saudi Arabia
  • Ludhiana, India
  • Delhi, India
  • Baoding, China
  • Xingtai, China

In these cities, the risks of exercise outweigh the benefits after just 45 minutes:

  • Bamenda, Cameroon
  • Raipur, India
  • Patna, India
  • Al Jubail, Saudi Arabia
  • Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

And in these cities, pollution levels are so high that just 30 minutes of outdoor cycling is more harmful than it is beneficial:

  • Allahabad, India
  • Gwalior, India
  • Zabol, Iran

Read more | follow @the-future-now

staying productive during the summer ☀️

hello! i only recently made this studyblr but today i just decided to go ahead and make a post! i thought this particular post would be relevant now because the summer is about to start or has already started for many of us. so, here are some ideas on staying productive during the summer:

work on all your summer assignments

this one’s kind of obvious. if you don’t want to spend the last week/day of the summer frantically doing ALL your summer work, do a little bit each day. to help get myself organized, i printed out some calendars (see picture) and broke down my summer assignments so that way, i only have a little bit to do each day.

prepare for next year

it would be a good idea to see what you can do to help your future self do less work next year. for example: as an ib student, i am planning on using the summer between my junior and senior year to write notes for ib chem and ib bio for multiple reasons, but also because i won’t have to waste time doing that next year. as you can see, i also used my calendar system for this by assigning a section or two to cover each day!

s l e e p

although you can’t really “catch up” on the hours of sleep you missed during the school year, you can still get enough sleep each day! relax! you can go to bed early or late, but you should be sure to get at least 8 hours of sleep! try not to sleep too much, though, because you won’t feel too good when you wake up.

clean!

if you’re anything like me, then after finals your room looks like a tornado hit it!!! now, whether this is or isn’t true, i think it would still be a good idea to do some cleaning. clean your room, organize your closet, donate old clothes, reorganize your desk drawers, rearrange your bookshelf…you will definitely feel so much better after you’re done.

do something cool

why don’t you spend some time during the summer volunteering or picking up a new skill or hobby? you can learn a new language, learn some new recipes, learn to code, learn to draw realistically–you can learn anything!

but don’t forget:

actually have fun

while i believe it is very important to be productive during the summer and get  work done, it’s also important for you to spend time doing things you enjoy: read, draw/paint, watch tv shows, movies, documentaries, hang out with your friends, play video games, play with your pets, go to the beach, visit an amusement park! 

take care of yourself

  • work out a couple times a week. make or listen to a playlist while you work out, find an exercise buddy, and just devote some of your time to exercise! exercising has many benefits!!! it will make you feel good and fresh!
  • take care of your body. put on face masks, hair masks, moisturize…
  • honestly, just do what relaxes you! pamper yourself, you deserve it!

lifehack 2k15!! the secret to weight loss ^^^^ 

iridescentautistic  asked:

Okay, I'm borderline plus size, because I'm really petite/short and I'm getting more and more in love with my body because of body positivity and fat positivity! I think it's totally great. I got a gym membership mostly because I want to exercise for the health benefits (ie, better heart function, sleeping better, stronger muscles etc.) I'm not trying to lose weight but if I do and I'm happy abt it is that internalized fatphobia? (Sorry if this is dumb I just don't really know much about this)

TW for a discussion of weight loss–

This is a kind of a difficult question to answer, b/c what I suspect you are sort of going for is– am I a bad person b/c I want to lose weight? And no. You aren’t. Like, the world makes it super clear that our lives would be easier if we were smaller. And it is exhausting to fight a stigma all the time.

But you didn’t exactly ask that question. You asked, is it internalized fatphobia to want to lose weight. And I think the answer to that question is yes. 

Because when we say we want to lose weight, when the entire world pressures everyone to lose lose lose and be as small and hungry and obsessed as possible– what we are all doing together as a culture is saying that thin is good and fat is bad. That it’s better to do literally anything and suffer any misery than to be fat. And that cultural attitude is fatphobia.

When we know we would have an easier life if we were thinner, we aren’t wrong or confused about that. We would have easier lives if we were thinner. That’s just true. But most people are wrong about why our lives would be easier.

It’s not that being smaller is inherently easier or better. It is that society brings unbearable pressure to bear on fat people and the smaller you get, the more the pressure is eased off. 

But that is a choice we have made together as a culture, not a natural law about body size. 150 years ago, it was not this way. 

It’s not surprising that you would feel relief and happiness at weight loss. Some of the pressure in your life would ease up. People would praise and admire you. It is natural to want those things. You are a human being. It doesn’t make you a bad person.

But the reason you would be praised, why you would be happier and have less pressure on you– is because some other people are being subjected to more pressure, criticism and pain than people should have to bear. For no reason. 

And that is something to keep in mind. 

look at all of the good cardio can do for you! :)

One thing that really appeals to me about dom!Eren is the fact that behind what people tend to perceive as an angry surface, Eren has a very caring and nurturing nature, and he would definitely benefit a lot from the opportunity to exercise that side of him. I also love to think he would greatly appreciate someone recognizing that and putting that kind of trust in him, despite the rest of the world still being hesitant about him and seeing him as a “monster”.

instagram

I always say your core is your foundation so my bodyweight and gymnastic exercises/ movements benefit greatly from exercises such as squats and deadlifts; don’t skip leg day! #fitfam #legday @armyfreshfitness @militaryfreshfitness #fitness #nutrition #bodybuilding #core #exercise #jumpsquats #fitlife #instafit #gains #deadlift #squat #crossfit #power #armyfresh #militaryfitness #bodyweight #calisthenics #gymnastics #pushyourself #hardwork #gym #gohard #gymlife #improve #progress #endurance #workoutmotivation

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you need to figure out what works for you. dont worry about anyone else. 

Tips to Boost Your Metabolism

Need a boost? Here’s some tips to make sure you’re metabolism is functioning properly.

1) Vitamins Niacin, Vitamin B-6, and Iron helps boost your metabolism by assisting the production of L-carnitine, an amino acid that helps promote fat-burning.

2) Be sure to eat a healthy breakfast, what you eat determines the rest of your day. If you skip you’ll put your body in starvation mode and you’ll be sluggish.

3) Drink cold water, you’re body has to use more energy to heat it up.

4) Run, or do some type of exercise to get your heart rate up. The benefits will follow you for up to 4 hours.

It's time💪🏽

Recently, my mental state wasn’t too great and I took a break from my workout routine and haven’t been eating the best lately. But as of this Monday I’m back on track; I cleaned out my room, meal prepped, and got back to the gym and I’m feeling so much better. Since being off my normal routine, my skin has been breaking out worse than ever, and I always felt tired, and I was very moody and filled with negative thoughts. I’m going to the dermatologist tomorrow, so hopefully my skin starts to clear up soon, and as for my mental state, I’m feeling so great. It’s crazy how much your mental, emotional, and physical health all benefit from eating right and exercising. So many goals I’ve re-evaluated for the months to come and I can’t wait to see how it goes!

Aerobic Exercise Preserves Brain Volume and Improves Cognitive Function

Using a new MRI technique, researchers found that adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) who exercised four times a week over a six-month period experienced an increase in brain volume in specific, or local, areas of the brain, but adults who participated in aerobic exercise experienced greater gains than those who just stretched. The study was presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).

“Even over a short period of time, we saw aerobic exercise lead to a remarkable change in the brain,” said the study’s lead investigator, Laura D. Baker, Ph.D., from Wake Forest School of Medicine (WFSM) in Winston-Salem, N.C.

The study included 35 adults with MCI participating in a randomized, controlled trial of exercise intervention. Individuals with MCI are at risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the most common form of dementia, which affects more than 5 million Americans today.

The participants were divided into two groups. Sixteen adults (average age 63 years) engaged in aerobic activity, including treadmill, stationary bike or elliptical training, four times per week for six months. A control group of 19 adults (average age 67 years) participated in stretching exercises with the same frequency. High-resolution brain MR images were acquired from all participants before and after the six-month activity period. The MRI results were compared using conventional and biomechanical metrics to measure the change in both brain volume and shape.

“We used high-resolution MR images to measure anatomical changes within areas of the brain to obtain both volumetric data and directional information,” said Jeongchul Kim, Ph.D., co-investigator on the study from WFSM.  

The analysis revealed that for both the aerobic and stretching groups, brain volume increased in most gray matter regions, including the temporal lobe, which supports short-term memory.  

“Compared to the stretching group, the aerobic activity group had greater preservation of total brain volume, increased local gray matter volume and increased directional stretch of brain tissue,” Dr. Kim said.  

Among participants of the stretching group, the analysis revealed a local contraction, or atrophy, within the white matter connecting fibers. According to Dr. Kim, such directional deformation, or shape change, is partially related to volume loss, but not always.

“Directional changes in the brain without local volume changes could be a novel biomarker for neurological disease,” he said. “It may be a more sensitive marker for the tiny changes that occur in a specific brain region before volumetric changes are detectable on MRI.”

He said both MRI measures are important to the treatment of MCI and AD, which require the careful tracking of changes in the brain while patients engage in interventions including diet and exercise to slow the progression of the disease.

Study participants were tested to determine the effect of exercise intervention on cognitive performance. Participants in the aerobic exercise group showed statistically significant improvement in executive function after six months, whereas the stretching group did not improve.

“Any type of exercise can be beneficial,” Dr. Kim said. “If possible, aerobic activity may create potential benefits for higher cognitive functioning.”