the beauty of living

See the world as the beautiful, wonderful place that it is. See the goodness that exists within it. See the miracles that lie all around you, each and every second of each and every day.
—  Nicole Addison @thepowerwithin
10

A Wrinkle in Time, the 1963 masterpiece children’s science fiction novel written by prolific Christian author, the late Madeleine L'Engle, has been adapted by phenom female director Ava DuVernay (Selma, 13th). DuVernay is the first black female director to helm a $100 million dollar Hollywood blockbuster.

A Wrinkle in Time took the teachings of C.S. Lewis (Mere Christianity, The Chronicles of Narnia) and turned them on a spin. Her more liberal teachings of Christianity didn’t bode well with more fundamental Christians who protested against the major themes of the brilliant novel.

In the novel, L’Engle discusses the battle of good vs. evil as the battle of light vs. darkness. They recognize the roles that children have in the future of our planet and how the cosmic beings of the light guide them to find the protectors to help the fight of prevailing darkness. The children find the Messianic figures that have been Earthlings in philosophers, not in gods. Jesus is with Budah as well as DaVinci, Shakespeare, Einstein, Bach, and Gandhi. Together they children join forces with them to fight The Dark Thing.

These themes radically influenced authors and filmmakers such as George Lucas in his larger-than-life creation, Star Wars, and Philip K. Dick in Do Androids Sleep of Electric Sheep or better known as Blade Runner mainstreamed by Ridley Scott. 

The concept of the Tesseract is important in the themes of the novel.  The tesseract is the four-dimensional analog of the cube. In A Wrinkle in Time, we learn the Megan Murry has to travel to the fifth dimension to save her scientist father who is being kept in the darkness. The five dimensions are: linear (first), square (second), cube (third), Einstein’s concept of time (fourth), and tesseract (fifth). Her concepts of time and space, entering the wormhole resembles that of a twin paradox.  A wormhole is a theoretical passage through space-time that could create shortcuts for long journeys across the universe. Wormholes are predicted by the theory of general relativity. Wormholes bring with them the dangers of sudden collapse, high radiation and dangerous contact with exotic matter. 

The twin paradox is a thought experiment in special relativity involving identical twins, one of whom makes a journey into space in a high-speed rocket and returns home to find that the twin who remained on Earth has aged more, thus the returning twin is now the younger twin of the two.

Everything, in theory, is a direct consequence of relativity and that’s the magic of A Wrinkle in Time. The idea that in every social circle we are presented with the superiority and inferiority complexes that shape and mold the perception of power in this universe. In every group, there are those that challenge the minority groups and the status quo, and it is up to us to be a part of the resistance against peer-pressured superiority. Social class is nothing more than a feudalistic attempt to hold power over a group and dominate their every way of life. 

In the novel, we also explore that humans cannot be whole without the juxtaposition of pragmatism and romanticism (rationality and creativity). When the Ws challenge Meg and her friends to come up with a list of fighters, she sees life in a rational direction that there’s no counterpoint to logic. She is in her comfort zone and life doesn’t always work in predictability. We need to find the happy medium in all of us as wisely manifested in the Happy Medium, an amalgamation as told by Mrs. Murry.