the bat thing

STEAL HIS LUNCH MONEY (standalone picture from this post)

@koryos from what you’ve written about working with flying foxes, they seem the type to bully some poor nerd.

a thing about bats that I completely forgot earlier: not only are their knees backwards, but their whole legs and feet are backwards– gr8 for hanging upside-down from stuff, absolutely terrible for being drawn standing up. Bats, god.

a not-entirely-earthling stinky boy

hi i really love colors and fallout new vegas so let me tell you fnv has great colors and anyone who says its boring sucks

the box and promotional art, with reds, dark bowns, and bright yellow. The start screen has a offset of a cool grey to show off a full moon, but its the same colors. The default UI is specifically a yellow, which every other game has as green. Its all correlated, nicely.

The game has this same color pallet throughout! with small variations like caves and vaults to bring you into a dungeon. The biggest outliner for it is Vegas, where theres a lot of clashing colors from the hotels different themes. it really feels like a Wizard of Oz experience, especially with House’s face being bright green and practically alien in the red, black, and white color scheme of Lucky 38.

Goodsprings is all light browns with wooden buildings with red paints. Primm uses dark browns, yellow lights. Novac has the bright red legion flags, the fires, more browns. The only times you see greens are for “alien” objects. Novac has Dinky, but even then it’s washed out to blend in and mesh with the mojave… compared to vault 22 with its bright green plants or vault 34’s radioactive waste puddles.

the biggest problem with the vanilla game is just the lighting. no its not natural at all, its very stylistic that makes everything yellowish. Video games have that issue trying to balance naturalistic and stylistic elements. but fnv has a really easy to read color language, with nice balances. even in the dlcs you get separate correlations! its awesome, i love the stylistic colors in each of them :D

anonymous asked:

What are your opinions on John winchester... just my curiosity spiking?

Oh boy, that one. 

I think he was a bad, neglectful parent. But I don’t agree with the pretty wide-spread characterization of him as a total demonic, drunk asshole who hates his kids’ guts and beats them up. I don’t think John actually beat them up – not on a regular basis, at least? I could maybe see arguments getting heated and violent, but not so much of a constant smackdown for every small mistake. He might have put them down verbally, if the Impala comment to Dean in the end of s1 was anything to go by… we all know Dean would never let Baby get rust or anything :(

I think he, kinda, destroyed them emotionally and totally didn’t provide enough support. He loved Sam and Dean, I’m pretty sure – but love alone’s not enough. He was a traumatized, scared man who wasn’t in the place to raise kids. I know it turned out that this childhood was the only way Sam and Dean could save the world. If they were raised happy and safe without any training and only ever becoming close with each other in their formative years, I doubt they could foil Lucifer’s plans that were thousands of years in the making in Swan Song. But John had no way of knowing that, so, that’s no excuse!

Also, that face that Dean makes in the Dark Side of the Moon when talking about John…

Yeah, that one. Poor guy. From the looks of it, John would never let them be kids, especially not Dean with his parentification burden. I could maybe understand wanting your kids to be ready if you know monsters are coming for them. But, damn, he could’ve stayed with them. Teach them how to shoot a gun if you really gotta, but you can also play catch with them and read them bedtime stories, yanno. 

Serious Squareness: an exclusive interview with Lorenzo Semple, Jr. on the creation of TV’s Batman

Holy unexpected delights! I opened my Tumblr inbox the other day to find a message from @jondambacher, and, well, let me just turn it over to him:

Screenwriter Lorenzo Semple, Jr. celebrates a birthday today (March 23rd). The following is an excerpt from a number of long interviews I was blessed, honored & ecstatic to conduct in 2008, for Lorenzo’s biography I was writing.

To the King of Serious Squareness, I celebrate you, I thank you, I wish you a Happy Happy Birthday.

Jon Dambacher: I have a quote from Dozier referring to you as “the most bizarre thinker I knew.”

Lorenzo Semple: Good.

JD: Have you ever read that?

LS: I think I have, now that you mention it.

JD: What do you think he means here?

LS: I don’t know what he means. He obviously meant it as a compliment but it’s… I don’t know what he meant. I just could think of off-the-wall things. When he showed me, as I’ve told you, when I was living in Spain writing plays with a family, he sent me a cable to come up and meet him at The Ritz in Madrid there in the garden of The Ritz, he had a very strange face, as he pulled out of his pocket a “Batman” comic book. Said, “Would you believe it, this is what ABC has given us to do, because they’d owed us one, can you believe it? He was… Was so disdainful of it. I, uh, in all honesty, I took one look at it and thought of it and said, "I know exactly what to do.” I’ll go home and I’ll write it.“ That was the only discussion about "Batman.” The only discussion. As I say I wrote it, Bill loved it, he gave it to ABC, they thought it was excellent, but they were dumbfounded by it because there was nothing like it. All those things like, “Pop!” and “Bam!” were all written into the script.

JD: That’s awesome! Did you guys just share some crazy sense of humor together–is that how you were able to create this amazing…

LS: Yeah! It’s not really that crazy once you get the note of it, you know what I mean?

JD: Okay.

LS: It’s all out of that same… That dead serious nonsense, you know what I mean? Adam was actually perfect for it and Burt in his way, too. You know, they’d be chasing somebody and Robin would say, “Park here, they just went into that building…”

JD: And there’s “No Parking” signs…

LS: “No Parking” sign, right! That kind of thing. All these come out of the same level of dead serious, squareness, if you want to call it that. Dead seriously square. That was… Which isn’t that bizarre compared to modern movies, you know, like Charlie Kaufman and things.

JD: Right.

LS: It wasn’t too bizarre. Bill probably thought it was bizarre but we’ve both recognized he was a sophisticated guy. He recognized it as being funny. He didn’t mind me thinking up all these things like Bat-Shark-Repellent or whatever it was when the shark had him by the leg…

JD: Right, the Shark-Repellent-Bat Spray.

LS: I guess you could call that bizarre thinking. To me it’s all a part of one type of thinking; do you know what I mean? Bizarre isn’t quite the word, I’d say imaginative.

JD: Okay. We were talking about favorite lines from that film specifically, one that’s stuck with me over the years–I’ve always wanted to meet the man who wrote the line, “Ah, a thought strikes me–so dreadful I scarcely dare give it utterance!”

(Lorenzo breaks out laughing.)

LS: That’s very funny, I agree! I agree! That’s the kind of thing we’ve been–you know, that pompous squareness actually. Very good hearted. Adam was a very sweet guy. A very nice guy himself and Batman, you know, nobody was killed in it and there’s nothing–except the name–in common with the Batman franchise, the Warner Brothers ones. The people who say, “What do you feel about those movies” always expect me to say something, I say, “Actually I don’t like violent movies particularly and I stay away from them.” The Batman I wrote has nothing to do with these movies–really has nothing to do with each other… My Batman is more in the spirit of the comic and the very fact that millionaire Bruce Wayne, that’s all you have to say… The fact that you refer to him as Millionaire Bruce Wayne, I mean…

JD: The Millionaire Philanthropist.

LS: The Millionaire–thank you! The Millionaire Philanthropist. I had forgotten that. Just the fact that you’d refer to anybody like that–if you’re sophisticated it shows immediately–it’s ironic at best.

JD: That squareness.

LS: You’re right. That’s what I mean. The squareness, exactly.

6

some sonic doodols, including:

-knuckles
-half assed shadow on lined paper
-rouge in a different outfit
-amy
-very small knuckles that i was apparently excited about
-human shadow, less half assed