the bad beginning or orphans

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“What Shall I Do, Lemony Snicket?” from one of the special paperback versions of A Series of Unfortunate Events. I think this was from The Bad Beginning, or Orphans! 

I took these back in June of 2015 right after I graduated high school and was going to the campus university bookstore after our orientation and class scheduling. I’m glad I did because the bookstore doesn’t carry it anymore or else I would have totally bought it now. 

I just love these questions and answers, so I wanted to keep them as a means to laugh or smile when I was bored or upset. Now I felt like sharing them with you all. 

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👁️ The Baudelaire Orphans in every episode 👁️ | 1x01 The Bad Beginning: Part One

Violet, Klaus, and Sunny Baudelaire were intelligent children, and they were charming, and resourceful, and had pleasant facial features, but they were extremely unlucky, and most everything that happened to them was rife with misfortune, misery, and despair.

A Series Of Unfortunate Aesthetics: Sunny Baudelaire

“The last safe place, is safe no more..” 

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baudelaire orphan compilation/gifset

“’life isn’t fair,’ he said, in his undisguised voice, and for once the baudelaire orphans agreed with every word the man said.”

It is useless for me to describe to you how terrible Violet, Klaus, and even Sunny felt in the time that followed. If you have ever lost someone very important to you, then you already know how it feels, and if you haven’t, you cannot possibly imagine it.

The Baudelaire Orphans - The Bad Beginning


-The Puttanesca Project

“"Hello hello hello”, Count Olaf said in a wheezy whisper. He was very tall and very thin, dressed in a gray suit that had many dark stains on it. His face was unshaven, and rather than two eyebrows, like most human beings have, he had just one long one. His eyes were very, very shiny, which made him look both hungry and angry.“
-Lemony Snicket : "The Bad Beginning”

How did VFD manipulate Justice Strauss into joining them?

Justice Strauss appears to have been recruited by VFD to find the Baudelaires and put a stop to the crimes of Olaf and his allies:

“And I’m afraid I wasn’t a guardian at all,” Justice Strauss said. “As soon as you were taken away in that automobile, I knew I had done the wrong thing, and when I heard the dreadful news about Dr. Montgomery I began searching for you. Eventually I found other people who were also trying to battle the wicked villains of this world, but I always hoped I would find you myself, if only to say how sorry I was.”
[The Penultimate Peril, Chapter Eight]

But clearly the implication of such an important character couldn’t limit itself to watching birds with sunoculars or caring for three orphaned children. No, Strauss’ recruitment is part of much more important plan designed by VFD; “saving” the Baudelaires is more of an incentive the organization uses to motivate her.

When did this recruitment scheme start? How was Jacques Snicket involved? And what does it teach us about VFD’s actual plan during the events of “The Penultimate Peril”? Learn more after the cut.

Keep reading

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i’m so sorry i’ve been so inactive! i’m getting my vfd tattoo relatively soon, and before i do, i have decided to reread the series for the 5729274 time. i hope all my volunteers are doing great, love you guys!

-L.

here’s a bad beginning quote for you guys <3

“The way sadness works is one of the strange riddles of the world. If you are stricken with a great sadness, you may feel as if you have been set aflame, not only because of the enormous pain, but also because your sadness may spread over your life, like smoke from an enormous fire. You might find it difficult to see anything but your own sadness, the way smoke can cover a landscape so that all anyone can see is black. You may find that if someone pours water all over you, you are damp and distracted, but not cured of your sadness, the way a fire department can douse a fire but never recover what has been burnt down”

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First look at Lemony Snicket, The Baudelaire Orphans, Uncle Monty, and Stephano, an Italian man, in The Reptile Room Part 1 & 2

anonymous asked:

do you have any idea why count olaf had such a creepy fascination with violet? did she remind him of someone?

Violet looks very much like her mother:

In the darkness, Violet looked like a ghost, her quite wedding gown moving slowly across the stage. My commonplace book contains at least seventeen interviews with people who remarked that due to the facial resemblance, the white dress, and the dim lighting, Violet Baudelaire looked quite a bit like a woman who is no longer alive. Please see also my note to page 124.
[The Bad Beginning: Rare Edition, p.157]

Olaf clearly uses the Baudelaire orphans as substitutes for their parents. He can’t hurt them anymore, so he’s moved on to the persons they cared about the most. Plus he’s a villainous criminal with no inhibition whatsoever, so the perverse part of him is probably fantasizing about all the depraved things he could do to Beatrice through her daughter. Or maybe pedophilia is just one of his many usual vices.

If you are interested in stories with happy endings, you would be better off reading some other book. In this book, not only is there no happy ending, there is no happy beginning and very few happy things in the middle. This is because not very many happy things happened in the lives of the three Baudelaire youngsters. Violet, Klaus, and Sunny Baudelaire were intelligent children, and they were charming, and resourceful, and had pleasant facial features, but they were extremely unlucky, and most everything that happened to them was rife with misfortune, misery, and despair. I’m sorry to tell you this, but that is how the story goes.

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Malina Weissman as Violet Baudelaire

Louis Hynes as Klaus Baudelaire

& Neil Patrick Harris as Count Olaf

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This particular morning it was gray and cloudy, which didn’t bother the Baudelaire youngsters one bit. When it was hot and sunny, Briny Beach was crowded with tourists and it was impossible to find a good place to lay one’s blanket. On gray and cloudy days, the Baudelaires had the beach to themselves to do what they liked. 

The calm before the storm… 

-The Puttanesca Project