the artist in his museum

10

Museum Photographs by Thomas Struth

Thomas Struth is one of the most critically acclaimed contemporary photographers of our time. He is renowned for his black and white photographs of cities such as Düsseldorf and New York, as well as his family portraits. The artist who lives in Dusseldorf acquired his inspiration for his series of Museum Photographs while he was residing in Naples and Rome, where he discovered that there was a connection between paintings of art and religion and how these paintings connect audiences to their spirituality.

In his series, Struth photographed the art and the visitors viewing it, as well as the viewer observing other audiences. As such, with the many layers of observation, Struth’s intention was to assess the museum’s control of their audience and the criteria that each museum has for exhibiting pieces in the way that it does. The purpose behind the Museum Photographs was to remind people that the iconic subjects of his photographs were once just unfamiliar paintings done by ordinary individuals.

anonymous asked:

Could u tell is about your ocs?

FUCK
YOU’VE DONE IT NOW
YOU OPENED THE FLOOD GATES
BE PREPARED
ALSO, HAVE SOME OLD ART OF THEM

JAIDEV
Age: 28
Race: Indian
He is a bodyguard. If you read ORD then you may recognize him as a very minor character who shows up for about 3 pages XD
His right arm is prosthetic due to an accident during one of his jobs as a bodyguard where he failed to locate a bomb in time.
Personality can be described as: Playful, flirtatious, and diligent.
Jaidev travels to different countries for his job and is fluent in many languages. He’s prone to being dramatic when goofing off and teasing the people he feels close to.
When working he’s fierce with a strong sense of duty.

ARCHER
Archer belongs to @sheilkuroi!
I’ll tell you all I know about him ^^
Archer is a Canadian artist. He displays his own pieces but also works with museums to help organize exhibits and stuff. His family consists of a strong will mother, gruff father, and a fun sister.
Personality: Blushing maiden at times, very sweet, passionate, NERD.
Archer, although looking like your typical quiet artist, is actually a huge nerd who has a dazzling smile. Able to keep up with Jaidev’s teasing jabs, he has a quick wit and isn’t the type to back down from a challenge.

THERE’S PROBABLY SOME THINGS I’M FORGETTING
SHEIL, ADD ANYTHING YOU FEEL I HAVE MISSED!!!

BUT YEAH
THEY ARE MARRIED NOW
AND I AM SO THRILLED

jauneya  asked:

The phantom boys + Mishima out here being dads.

Akira

  • Is the type of dad who spends a lot of time with his child. 
  • Goes to all his child’s performances.
  • Encourages his child to try their best while being well rounded.
  • He likes to play video games with his child and takes them often to the park.

Ryuji

  • Encourages his child to play outside quite a bit.
  • Often takes them to the park and on hikes.
  • Likes to run and encourages his child to exercise often.
  • Takes them to the arcade often to play video games.

Yusuke

  • Often takes his child to the museum to encourage artistic growth.
  • Encourages his child to follow his dreams, no matter what they maybe.
  • Makes sure he doesn’t miss a single activity.
  • Spoils his child and buys them things often.

Goro

  • Is really confused at first and isn’t sure how to be a dad.
  • Once he figures things out he makes sure to never let his child feel alone.
  • Becomes one of the best dads he can be, trying to always be there for his child and attending all activities.
  • Often takes them to the amusement park, and other places he was never taken to as a child.

Mishima

  • Is sort of a helicopter parent at first.
  • Once he realizes what he’s doing he makes sure to back off and let his child grow at their own pace.
  • Likes to encourage his child to be what they want to be.
  • Loves his child unconditionally.
It's You (Soulmate AU Newt Scamander x Reader)

A/N: Based on a request for a soulmate Newt imagine. Hope you enjoy!

Most people remembered their past lives. This also meant remembering the soulmate they had for each life; the person you were destined to be with stayed the same during each life.

Newt Scamander remembered everything. From his past careers, his past homes, and most importantly, you. He remembered everything about you and desperately searched for you during each lifetime. He always found you, though, so there he was in New York City, the year of 1926, searching for you as he wrote his book.

It wasn’t until Newt was in the Metropolitan Museum of Art when he found you.

Queenie and Tina had taken him sight seeing the day before he had to leave, the museum being the last stop. He had been looking for you the whole day, becoming more and more distraught as the hours ticked on. He knew you were in New York, he could feel your soul pulling him to you.

Newt told the Goldstein sisters about his life many centuries ago when he was an artist. Some of his work had been brought to the museum, and the sisters wanted to see. He led them to where his paintings were, his mind filling with memories from when he painted them. You had been by his side, painting your own canvases even though you weren’t very good. He had fallen so deeply in love with you during that life, his paintings all reflecting the adoration he felt towards you.

One of his paintings was of you by the sea during a trip to France. Your hair had been flowing in the wind, your dress twirling around you as you spun in a circle and breathed in the fresh air. You had given him a smile full of love, and it had struck a cord in him. He began to paint that image, watching as you played in the sand while he worked in a field.

“Newton!” You called out excitedly as you picked up a shell and raced over to him. “Is this not the most beautiful thing you have ever seen?”

“You are the most beautiful thing I have ever seen,” he declared with a smile as he wrapped his arms around your waist. He tugged you over so you stood between his legs that were dangling from his stool, his lips pressing a delicate kiss to the center of your back.

“Is this me?” You asked in awe as you admired his painting. The way he portrayed you in his work made your heart swell with love, and you promptly turned around to press a sweet kiss to his lips.

“It does not nearly capture your beauty the way it should be, for it was done so quickly that-”

You cut him off with another kiss before leaning back against him to look at the painting. “I love you, my silly artist.”

“Mon amour pour toi est éternal,” he whispered.

Newt stood in the doorway of the room that held his art, his heart fluttering from the memories. Queenie and Tina stood beside him, watching as he lost himself in his thoughts. Queenie watched the scenes play out in his head of his times with you when he painted, her eyes filling with tears as the pure love in his mind overwhelmed her.

“Shall we take a look?” Newt asked the sisters as he shook himself out of the memories. He wiped quickly underneath his eyes, stopping the tears that had begun to fall.

“Oh, Mr. Scamander,” Queenie gasped in awe as she looked around the room. Paintings upon paintings filled the walls, each of a pair of soulmates or of the girl she saw in his mind.

“They’re a bit outdated, but here they are,” he laughed sadly.

“They’re timeless,” a woman’s voice piped up from across the room. Besides Newt and the Goldstein sisters, there was only her.

“I’m glad someone thinks so,” Newt said as he walked towards the girl who was looking at a large portrait of Newt’s soulmate.

“I really love this one,” the girl said, pointing to the painting of his soulmate by the sea in France. “It feels like… it feels like I was there that day, watching this scene unfold. You’re the artist, am I correct?”

“I am the artist. It was a lovely day there in France, Y/N loved the sea and it was the perfect time to capture her excitement,” he recalled with a distant look in his eyes.

“It appears that all of us named Y/N love the sea,” she mused, turning to face Newt. “Do I look like her? It must be a Y/N thing, or maybe I’m just seeing something that isn’t there.”

“It’s you…” Newt choked out, the tears filling his eyes once again. His soulmate, his love, you! You were standing right in front of him! Why were you not in his arms? Why were you not pressing your lips against his in an attempt to help him keep his emotions at bay? You always did that when you met in a new lifetime.

“I’m flattered you see the resemblance, too,” you giggled, looking at the painting again.

“Y/N, love, please tell me you remember me?” Newt pleaded, a hand raising to rest on your shoulder and turn you to him. Your eyebrows furrowed as you looked at him, your teeth biting at your bottom lip in concentration. “Where’s your tattoo? Love, let me see the tattoo.”

“I’m sorry, but I wasn’t born with one,” you told him sadly.

“That’s not possible, I have yours right here!” He exclaimed, tugging the sleeve of his coat up to show you the name tattooed on his wrist.

“I don’t remember you, I’m so sorry,” you sniffled, your heart breaking at the soft sobs escaping the broken man in front of you. You desperately wished to remember him, but you understood that this happened to soulmates sometimes. It was just unfortunate that it was happening to you.

“I love you,” he cried, face red as the hot tears streamed down his face. He was a shattered reflection of himself, his once confident persona destroyed once you said you didn’t remember him.

“What can I do?” You frantically questioned, reaching foward to grab onto his shaking hands. You felt awful for him and knew that he wasn’t lying about your past with each other.

“I-I don’t know,” he whispered through his crying. Hurt was coursing through him like the blood in his veins. Confusion filled his mind as he attempted to figure out why you didn’t remember him.

“I read once that one man made his soulmate remember by kissing them,” you breathed out after a moment of thinking. “I don’t usually kiss someone I’ve only just met-” Newt let out a broken whimper. “-but I can make an exception for my soulmate.”

Before he could say anything, your lips were pressed against his. A gasp fell from his lips, but it was muffled by your mouth. Newt moved his hands so they were tangled in your hair, your own hands grabbing tightly onto his jacket. When you pulled away, Newt cradled your face in his hands, his forehead resting against yours as he searched your eyes for any kind of recognition as to who he was.

The two words that came out of your mouth sent him crashing to the ground, the pain becoming too much to bear.

“I’m sorry.”

10

ROB CRASH MAGAZINE INTERVIEW IN FULL WITH BETTER SCANS

Robert Pattinson, who became an international star at the age of 22, thanks to his role as a vampire in the Twilight saga, definitively changed his image in 2012 with his masterful interpretation in Cronenberg’s ‘Cosmopolis’. Since then, he’s looking for working on indie projects and movies that are different. At Cannes, he plays a marginalised character in 'Good Time’ by the Safdie brothers. This highly anticipated independent production is in the official selection of the Festival. After Cannes, it’s a shoot with Claire Denis that is waiting for him. For Crash, he accepted to play along with the artist Torbjorn Rodland and again he didn’t hesitate to break his image … As for Torbjorn Rodland, he will have an exhibition in Paris in June, at La Galerie Air de Paris.
How was the photoshoot with Torbjorn Rodland? He’s a real artist. Usually he shows his work in art galleries or museums. He isn’t a classical fashion photographer.
Rob: It was funny. It was interesting and really different from usual photoshoots. Yes it was a really interesting shoot. I really love his work and he also gave me his book. He’s really brilliant.
Let’s talk about your upcoming movie 'Good Time’. How did you meet the directors, Josh & Ben Safdie?
Rob: I saw 'Heavens Knows What’ a long time ago. There was something magical with Arielle Holmes’ energy, the star of the movie. So I contacted Josh and Benny and met them in LA. I really liked them. They have an incredible energy and I really felt like something good could be done. I really made myself the promise to do anything they would ask me during this first meeting. Considering what they have done until now, I think I was right.
We can feel this energy from the beginning of the film. It’s really dramatic, the soundtrack is excellent, the film is very original and different… And it’s also totally an indie project.
Rob: I got the same feeling about the film: it is very unique compared to all the movies that are released right now. We no longer make movies like they do. So I really can’t wait to see how the audience will react. The shoot went really well.
And it’s also a small production …
Rob: Yes a very tiny one. But we put tons and tons of energy in it. It was really an intense shoot: at least 16 hours of work a day. In the end, we could have made three or four movies with the footage we had!
Would you want to work with them again?
Rob: Of course I would! I would do anything with them. With a snap of a finger!
Good Time is a very moving film. It follows two brothers, one of them has a mental disorder and his big brother tries to help him. How do you see their relationship?
Rob: One of the brothers, Nick, is mentally disabled and Connie, my character, is kind of mentally crazy too! He’s not a reasonable guy who takes normal and rational decisions. He convinced himself that he can do everything he wants, as soon as it’s for his brother. But in fact he is always taking disastrous decisions. He isn’t normally connected to the world. Before the shoot, we worked really in depth on the relationship between Nick and Connie. Our idea was that Connie and Nick are in fact not really that close. Connie just came out of jail and he is aware he has to recreate a bond with his brother, but he doesn’t know him very well.
So it’s an unusual relationship. Connie doesn’t have a real family. He only has his bother.
Rob: Yes. And if you take a look at his character, he’s really the sort of guy who is rejected by his family. I think everybody knows somebody like him, someone who keeps testing the limits of people around him just to see what they will be able to accept. His family rejected him a long time ago.
Is it important for you to see a movie like this one being selected at Cannes?
Rob: Oh yes of course! Especially when you know how the movie saw the light of day. It began like a very small project and it proceeded very well. I really loved it the first time I saw it. And Cannes is also my favorite place to show movies. It’s really a different experience, even when you compare it to other film festivals. I think the Safdies really deserve to be there, especially in competition. I was so happy when they were selected in the official competition.
You also worked in big productions. Is it important for you to work on smaller indie projects?
Rob: Yes, even if I haven’t made any blockbuster movies for a long time. It’s really difficult to find interesting small projects. Someone can have a really good script, but doesn’t have what is needed to make a good film. The Safdies are really fascinating artists. Everybody wants to work with people like them. I was extremely lucky.
You also did two movies with David Cronenberg. How was it to work with him?
Rob: I did Cosmopolis with him about five years ago. It was a totally new experience for me. I would never have thought I would be able to do movie like this one and work with people like Cronenberg. And because David believed in me, my destiny took another path and it has completely changed my life. David is really the best.
Is he the best director you have worked with?
Rob: They’re all very good, but David’s movies are really different. I watched 'Videodrome’ the other day. He made movies in the early 80’ that are totally out of the ordinary, even today. But all the directors I worked with are amazing. His 80’ movies are completely crazy. Their style was really edgy for this time and they still are today.
The idea of 'Cosmopolis’ was also very new: to shoot an entire movie inside a limo and that is only focused on you.
Rob: The writing was so incredible. But I like people who have an original way of thinking. 'Good Time’ is like this too, considering it doesn’t give you any indication of the way you have to take it. Clearly there is no good and evil. I try to work with people that can detect the grey areas of existence. In the end they’re more intelligent. There are lots of similarities between the way the Safdies see the existence and the way Cronenberg does.
Do you want to work more in Europe than in the United States now?
Rob: Yes, I’ll play in a movie by Claire Denis this summer, in Germany. I think I’ll be there for three months or so. I don’t why it took me so long to work in Europe. It just happened.
Do you live in the UK or in the United States now?
Rob: In fact I’m living between London and LA.
Can you tell us more about this Claire Denis’ movie, 'High Life’? Is it in English or in French?
Rob: It’s in English. It takes place in a spaceship. It’s about a group of criminals who serve a sentenced to life imprisonment and they are given the opportunity to go on a space mission. But it’s also about a father/daughter relationship. There are lots of psychosexual questions in this movie. All Claire’s movies are very intense and interesting. I’m really looking forward to shoot it. I have waited about three years before the movie could be done.
Will it be the first time you’ll work with a French director?
Rob: Yes I think so. I was about to work in an Olivier Assayas’ movie, but it was stopped the day before the shoot. Twice in fact. So yes I think Claire will be the first French director.
What happened to Assayas’ movie? It was cancelled?
Rob: The movie was in the middle of the pre-production. I was doing the rehearsals for about two months. And then the day before the shoot, the funding of the project was rejected. And I came back a few months later and the same thing happened again. This kind of stuff happens very often with indie movies. People are looking for money everywhere they can, but nothing is ever safe. But I really loved the project. Maybe one day we’ll work together again.
It’s crazy how some projects are cancelled at the last minute. Are you also involved in producing movies?
Rob: I would like to be involved in some specific projects. It has not been long since I started to trust directors completely. A few years ago, I would never have been able to commit myself 100% to someone else’s ideas. I realized that if you let the director being the director and that you’re the actor and only the actor, it’s strangely very liberating. I think you learn to do much better. But I’m always looking for things I could produce. I haven’t found the perfect project yet.
It can be very interesting to be involved in production, but it’s a different kind of work …
Rob: On 'Good Time’, I liked the producers’ open-mindedness with me. It feels great to be part of a whole process rather than just doing your job as an actor and that nobody talks to you until the premiere. I’ll certainly try to produce, but later.
You’re really young to do all these things at the same time …
Rob: But I’m getting older! (Laughs) I always think that I’m young, but I’m not so young.
You began to do movies very early …
Rob: It helps when you’re doing a movie like 'Good Time’, when you’re shooting at night and during hours. A life won’t be enough to do movies like that. It’s a lot of responsibility towards other people. But once again, the other day I watched 'King of New York’. You feel like this movie delivers a totally wild energy but Abel Ferrara begins to get older now.
Are you going from a movie to another or do you take breaks?
Rob: I want to go from a movie to another, but the projects I like take so much time to be made. I ended walking around my living room for months and months, praying the project would begin soon. I wrapped 'Good Time’ a long time ago and it is only released now.
Are you able to have a normal life now that you’re famous?
Rob: A few years ago, it was much more intense, but I have a normal life now. I don’t do a lot of stuff apart from walking my dog and reading books occasionally. I do absolutely nothing ! I’m really a home-lover. Since I’m starting a way of living, I can do exactly the same stuff for weeks. It makes other people crazy but I can eat the same meal, do the same thing and go to bed at the same hour for a year.
Are you working on other projects?
Rob: I’ll do a movie with Antonio Campos, 'Afterschool’. It’s a kind of gothic thriller from the South.
Do you start the filming of Claire Denis’ movie just after Cannes?
Rob: Yes and it’ll take a lot of time. I think I’ll shoot until the fall.
So it means no summer holidays for you …
Rob: Living in LA is like being always on a holiday. I have already had too much! (Laughs)
You’re lucky! One last question: do you remember when you decided to become an actor? Was it a clear decision that you took at a specific moment?
Rob: I did my first audition when I was 16 or something like that, just a part of me wanted to be an actor. Gradually, I began to take this more seriously. And during every shoot, I thought it would be probably the last one, so I wanted to make the best of it. I don’t think that one day I thought 'This is what i want to do’. But I can’t imagine doing something else now. Today, I can say I did this for half of my life. It’s kind of crazy!
Do you know how many movies you did?
Rob: 23 or something like that? In fact I have no clue!
It’s not too many. Actually you need to do a bit more …
Rob: Yeah! I need to increase the number!

Thanks to Pattinson Art Work for translation and scans

colors.

Originally posted by ohbaekhyuns

everything was blue.

soundtrack to this scenario here. [ x ]

because i can never resist a good soulmate! au.


A sense of creativity had always flowed in your veins, mingled with the smell of oil paints and the brushstrokes of a watercolor artwork. Being an artist had always been your dream, despite the fluctuating salary that came with the occupation. But, you never felt entitled to pursue it. Cooking was always more your passion anyway, but you figured, since you had to take a class on the arts, you might as well learn a bit more about its history.

Your art history professor had taken your class on a field trip to a museum that housed “the finest of arts, the treasures of the historical eras!” Trailing in after your fellow classmates and tourists, you feasted your eyes upon the inside of the museum.  The museum had a sort of modern glow to it, plain white walls lined every so often with a sculpture or a painting, sometimes even an artifact. You filed in past the front desk where an elderly lady sat with a stamp ready in her hand, the fresh red mark of the current exhibit appearing on your flesh.

Your professor had marveled about this very exhibit in the weeks leading up to the trip, eyes glazed over in anticipation and revere. The exhibit for the Mystery Woman in Blue, practically a version of not a very known Mona Lisa, was known all throughout the world. The painting had made its fair trips around the country, but now, it had appeared at the museum near your university. The artist left nothing but his initials, PCY.

Keep reading

10

ROB CRASH MAGAZINE INTERVIEW IN FULL WITH BETTER SCANS

Robert Pattinson, who became an international star at the age of 22, thanks to his role as a vampire in the Twilight saga, definitively changed his image in 2012 with his masterful interpretation in Cronenberg’s ‘Cosmopolis’. Since then, he’s looking for working on indie projects and movies that are different. At Cannes, he plays a marginalised character in 'Good Time’ by the Safdie brothers. This highly anticipated independent production is in the official selection of the Festival. After Cannes, it’s a shoot with Claire Denis that is waiting for him. For Crash, he accepted to play along with the artist Torbjorn Rodland and again he didn’t hesitate to break his image … As for Torbjorn Rodland, he will have an exhibition in Paris in June, at La Galerie Air de Paris.
How was the photoshoot with Torbjorn Rodland? He’s a real artist. Usually he shows his work in art galleries or museums. He isn’t a classical fashion photographer.
Rob: It was funny. It was interesting and really different from usual photoshoots. Yes it was a really interesting shoot. I really love his work and he also gave me his book. He’s really brilliant.
Let’s talk about your upcoming movie 'Good Time’. How did you meet the directors, Josh & Ben Safdie?
Rob: I saw 'Heavens Knows What’ a long time ago. There was something magical with Arielle Holmes’ energy, the star of the movie. So I contacted Josh and Benny and met them in LA. I really liked them. They have an incredible energy and I really felt like something good could be done. I really made myself the promise to do anything they would ask me during this first meeting. Considering what they have done until now, I think I was right.
We can feel this energy from the beginning of the film. It’s really dramatic, the soundtrack is excellent, the film is very original and different… And it’s also totally an indie project.
Rob: I got the same feeling about the film: it is very unique compared to all the movies that are released right now. We no longer make movies like they do. So I really can’t wait to see how the audience will react. The shoot went really well.
And it’s also a small production …
Rob: Yes a very tiny one. But we put tons and tons of energy in it. It was really an intense shoot: at least 16 hours of work a day. In the end, we could have made three or four movies with the footage we had!
Would you want to work with them again?
Rob: Of course I would! I would do anything with them. With a snap of a finger!
Good Time is a very moving film. It follows two brothers, one of them has a mental disorder and his big brother tries to help him. How do you see their relationship?
Rob: One of the brothers, Nick, is mentally disabled and Connie, my character, is kind of mentally crazy too! He’s not a reasonable guy who takes normal and rational decisions. He convinced himself that he can do everything he wants, as soon as it’s for his brother. But in fact he is always taking disastrous decisions. He isn’t normally connected to the world. Before the shoot, we worked really in depth on the relationship between Nick and Connie. Our idea was that Connie and Nick are in fact not really that close. Connie just came out of jail and he is aware he has to recreate a bond with his brother, but he doesn’t know him very well.
So it’s an unusual relationship. Connie doesn’t have a real family. He only has his bother.
Rob: Yes. And if you take a look at his character, he’s really the sort of guy who is rejected by his family. I think everybody knows somebody like him, someone who keeps testing the limits of people around him just to see what they will be able to accept. His family rejected him a long time ago.
Is it important for you to see a movie like this one being selected at Cannes?
Rob: Oh yes of course! Especially when you know how the movie saw the light of day. It began like a very small project and it proceeded very well. I really loved it the first time I saw it. And Cannes is also my favorite place to show movies. It’s really a different experience, even when you compare it to other film festivals. I think the Safdies really deserve to be there, especially in competition. I was so happy when they were selected in the official competition.
You also worked in big productions. Is it important for you to work on smaller indie projects?
Rob: Yes, even if I haven’t made any blockbuster movies for a long time. It’s really difficult to find interesting small projects. Someone can have a really good script, but doesn’t have what is needed to make a good film. The Safdies are really fascinating artists. Everybody wants to work with people like them. I was extremely lucky.
You also did two movies with David Cronenberg. How was it to work with him?
Rob: I did Cosmopolis with him about five years ago. It was a totally new experience for me. I would never have thought I would be able to do movie like this one and work with people like Cronenberg. And because David believed in me, my destiny took another path and it has completely changed my life. David is really the best.
Is he the best director you have worked with?
Rob: They’re all very good, but David’s movies are really different. I watched 'Videodrome’ the other day. He made movies in the early 80’ that are totally out of the ordinary, even today. But all the directors I worked with are amazing. His 80’ movies are completely crazy. Their style was really edgy for this time and they still are today.
The idea of 'Cosmopolis’ was also very new: to shoot an entire movie inside a limo and that is only focused on you.
Rob: The writing was so incredible. But I like people who have an original way of thinking. 'Good Time’ is like this too, considering it doesn’t give you any indication of the way you have to take it. Clearly there is no good and evil. I try to work with people that can detect the grey areas of existence. In the end they’re more intelligent. There are lots of similarities between the way the Safdies see the existence and the way Cronenberg does.
Do you want to work more in Europe than in the United States now?
Rob: Yes, I’ll play in a movie by Claire Denis this summer, in Germany. I think I’ll be there for three months or so. I don’t why it took me so long to work in Europe. It just happened.
Do you live in the UK or in the United States now?
Rob: In fact I’m living between London and LA.
Can you tell us more about this Claire Denis’ movie, 'High Life’? Is it in English or in French?
Rob: It’s in English. It takes place in a spaceship. It’s about a group of criminals who serve a sentenced to life imprisonment and they are given the opportunity to go on a space mission. But it’s also about a father/daughter relationship. There are lots of psychosexual questions in this movie. All Claire’s movies are very intense and interesting. I’m really looking forward to shoot it. I have waited about three years before the movie could be done.
Will it be the first time you’ll work with a French director?
Rob: Yes I think so. I was about to work in an Olivier Assayas’ movie, but it was stopped the day before the shoot. Twice in fact. So yes I think Claire will be the first French director.
What happened to Assayas’ movie? It was cancelled?
Rob: The movie was in the middle of the pre-production. I was doing the rehearsals for about two months. And then the day before the shoot, the funding of the project was rejected. And I came back a few months later and the same thing happened again. This kind of stuff happens very often with indie movies. People are looking for money everywhere they can, but nothing is ever safe. But I really loved the project. Maybe one day we’ll work together again.
It’s crazy how some projects are cancelled at the last minute. Are you also involved in producing movies?
Rob: I would like to be involved in some specific projects. It has not been long since I started to trust directors completely. A few years ago, I would never have been able to commit myself 100% to someone else’s ideas. I realized that if you let the director being the director and that you’re the actor and only the actor, it’s strangely very liberating. I think you learn to do much better. But I’m always looking for things I could produce. I haven’t found the perfect project yet.
It can be very interesting to be involved in production, but it’s a different kind of work …
Rob: On 'Good Time’, I liked the producers’ open-mindedness with me. It feels great to be part of a whole process rather than just doing your job as an actor and that nobody talks to you until the premiere. I’ll certainly try to produce, but later.
You’re really young to do all these things at the same time …
Rob: But I’m getting older! (Laughs) I always think that I’m young, but I’m not so young.
You began to do movies very early …
Rob: It helps when you’re doing a movie like 'Good Time’, when you’re shooting at night and during hours. A life won’t be enough to do movies like that. It’s a lot of responsibility towards other people. But once again, the other day I watched 'King of New York’. You feel like this movie delivers a totally wild energy but Abel Ferrara begins to get older now.
Are you going from a movie to another or do you take breaks?
Rob: I want to go from a movie to another, but the projects I like take so much time to be made. I ended walking around my living room for months and months, praying the project would begin soon. I wrapped 'Good Time’ a long time ago and it is only released now.
Are you able to have a normal life now that you’re famous?
Rob: A few years ago, it was much more intense, but I have a normal life now. I don’t do a lot of stuff apart from walking my dog and reading books occasionally. I do absolutely nothing ! I’m really a home-lover. Since I’m starting a way of living, I can do exactly the same stuff for weeks. It makes other people crazy but I can eat the same meal, do the same thing and go to bed at the same hour for a year.
Are you working on other projects?
Rob: I’ll do a movie with Antonio Campos, 'Afterschool’. It’s a kind of gothic thriller from the South.
Do you start the filming of Claire Denis’ movie just after Cannes?
Rob: Yes and it’ll take a lot of time. I think I’ll shoot until the fall.
So it means no summer holidays for you …
Rob: Living in LA is like being always on a holiday. I have already had too much! (Laughs)
You’re lucky! One last question: do you remember when you decided to become an actor? Was it a clear decision that you took at a specific moment?
Rob: I did my first audition when I was 16 or something like that, just a part of me wanted to be an actor. Gradually, I began to take this more seriously. And during every shoot, I thought it would be probably the last one, so I wanted to make the best of it. I don’t think that one day I thought 'This is what i want to do’. But I can’t imagine doing something else now. Today, I can say I did this for half of my life. It’s kind of crazy!
Do you know how many movies you did?
Rob: 23 or something like that? In fact I have no clue!
It’s not too many. Actually you need to do a bit more …
Rob: Yeah! I need to increase the number!

Thanks to Pattinson Art Work for translation and scans

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In a sense, we are all victims of the misogyny and racism that exist in the world, no matter what our gender or race happens to be. I think that there are different strategies in depicting women in paintings than men. I think it was an exciting opportunity to build upon the vocabulary that I created with all the work coming out of America, coming out of black masculinity, and turning it all on its head. I was able to look at the notion of dominance—how someone fills up the four corners of the tableau. Domination of that space is a very revolutionary act. And to be able to hand those keys over to the depiction of black women is a really magical thing to do.

Artist Kehinde Wiley’s latest exhibition,  Kehinde Wiley: A New Republic opens this Friday, February 20, at the Brooklyn Museum. Read our interview with the artist about his work here.

Right now, I’m lost in a transition. The old is dead, and I don’t know what the new is. The only way to find the new is to start different things and see if there’s something that can come out of experimentation. It’s somewhat unsettling, but it’s a hopeful thing in a way. I’ve been here before, lots of times.
4

I’m going to be putting together a series of blog posts concerning 100 influential and prolific illustrators that I believe every illustrator should know. These will not have any specific order of importance. Most bolded names will be clickable, which will link you to either one of these blog posts, if they happen to be an entry, or will link to a gallery of their work. 

Please REBLOG these posts to get these names out there, known and appreciated!

100 Illustrators that all Illustrators should know: #1

Howard Pyle (1853-1911)

Country: United States

Famous for: The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood, King Arthur, Pirates, Harper’s Weekly

Influenced: N.C. Wyeth, Frank Schoonover, Frank Frazetta, Gil Elvgren, The Red Rose Girls, Norman Rockwell, Dean Cornwell

Influenced by: Albrecht Durer, Winslow Homer

Howard Pyle is considered by many to be the father of American Illustration, and had a long-lasting and prolific career creating illustrations for fantasy and adventure stories. He founded the Howard Pyle School of Illustration Art, later coined the Brandywine School named after the area several of his most well-known students were from. Among his most notable students were N.C. Wyeth and Frank Schoonover. Along with his students, he is considered part of the collective known as the Brandywine River Artists, and his work remains in museums throughout the country. 

We went at a museum on Moreau today and I didn’t know him beforehand, but I’m super glad Vera said she wanted to go there. He was an amazing artist, and the museum had thousands of his sketches (literally: they were numbered), studies and compositions and all sorts of things

we didn’t manage to see everything in one go, so we’ll have to go again, and I’m super fine with that

les amis headcanons
  • marius: biromantic heterosexual. freckled dweeb. usually gets overexcited and is often the butt of jokes. cutie patootie.
  • éponine: bisexual. dark brown hair. she's the sort of person that walks into the room and everyone goes "hot damn." very into acting and films. in college on a scholarship. kicks ass.
  • enjolras: homoromantic asexual. Blonde hair nearly reaches his thighs. refuses to get a haircut. ever. likes platonically kissing and holding hands with everyone.
  • grantaire: homosexual. paints his feelings. gets drunk a lot. sometimes vomits on the canvas. once sold a vomit canvas as "artistic expression" to a high end museum. this was his greatest life achievement. hair is brunette and short. wants to make out with enjolras so badly but thinks he's straight. drunkenly made out with enjolras. doesn't remember. enjolras does.
  • courfeyrac: panromantic bisexual. obsessed with getting everyone else laid. has adhd. hair is light brown & curly af. wants to fuck combeferre but "doesn't want things to get weird between them" so he doesn't. also a dweeb.
  • combeferre: demiromantic pansexual. medical student. has glasses and short hair. in love with his bffl courfeyrac, but too invested in student loans and schoolwork to act upon it. if courf made the first move, would drop everything. the "you're smart, tell us how to fix this mess!" friend.
  • jehan prouvaire: panromantic gray-asexual. red hair. dyes it on sometimes, but always eventually reverts back to his natural color. dresses like a hipster on occasion, but on a daily basis wears the most godawful outfits. very into poetry.
  • feulily: pansexual. dirty blonde hair. nice to everyone. everyone loves him. a+ 10/10 would recommend being bffs with
  • joly: polysexual. light brown hair. dating musichetta and bousset. he's the short one. so many short jokes are made. so many.
  • bousset: polysexual. baldie. dating jolt and musichetta.
  • musichetta: polysexual. taller than both her boyfriends. buff af, but wears dainty clothing so not many people know it. punk rock af and decided to shave half her head.
  • gavroche: literally like 3 years old. blonde.