the american empire

If Steve Rogers knew the meaning of the phrase “social media”, you can imagine that his account would read something like Evans’. There have been tweets about his opposition to Donald Trump. A running battle with David Duke, the controversial former Imperial Wizard of the KKK in the United States. And when a young white supremacist named Nathan Damigo was recently caught on camera punching a woman, Evans simply tweeted, ‘I hope I run into Nathan.’ For years, we all assumed that Robert Downey Jr. was the Avengers star closest to his super-powered alter ego. Looks like it was Evans all along.
The Top Ten 90′s Teen Comedy Movies As Chosen By Me:

1. Clueless (1995)
2. Drop Dead Gorgeous (1999)
3. 10 Things I Hate About You (1999)
4. Election (1999)
5. Never Been Kissed (1999)
6. Bring it On (2000)
7. Can’t Hardly Wait (1998)
8. Jawbreaker (1999)
9. American Pie (1999)
10. She’s All That (1999)

Honorable Mentions: Drive Me Crazy, Idle Hands, Empire Records

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Thomas Cole (1801-1848)
The Course of Empire:
“The Savage State” (1834)
“The Arcadian” (1834)
“The Consummation of Empire” (1836)
“Destruction” (1836)
“Desolation” (1836)
Oil on canvas
Owned by the New-York Historical Society

The Course of Empire is a five-part series of paintings created by Thomas Cole in the years 1833–36.

The series of paintings depicts the growth and fall of an imaginary city, situated on the lower end of a river valley, near its meeting with a bay of the sea. The valley is distinctly identifiable in each of the paintings, in part because of an unusual landmark: a large boulder is precariously situated atop a crag overlooking the valley.

The Last Aztec Emperor

Cuauhtémoc was the son of Emperor Ahuizotl of the Aztec Empire. He was born around 1495. Bad, bad timing. In 1502 his uncle (or possibly cousin) Moctezuma II became ruler of the empire. Cuauhtémoc was busy going to a school for elite boys, then being a warrior. After a period of fighting Aztec enemies and capturing some for sacrificing, he was named ruler of Tlatelolco, with the title cuauhtlatoani (“eagle ruler”) in 1515.

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anonymous asked:

Hi! As a nonnative person, I was wondering if you could recommend at least 5 movies with native lead/supporting characters? I already have Rhymes for Young Ghouls to the list.

So apart from Rhymes For Young Ghouls, here are a few personal recommendations. Please note that not all of these films pass The Aila Test, but are still really good films with great characters and stories.

 I will specifically recommend live action films about Native Americans / First Nations, but if you want me to recommend films featuring other indigenous people (or animated films!), let me know.

1)  Maïna (2013)

Despite not passing The Aila Test, I personally loved Maina. This is the sort of film I wished The Revenant would have been like. It takes place in a pre-colonial time where two different indigenous groups met for the first time and stars a great main character. The film also tackles many uncomfortable issues including kidnapping, assimilation and sexual assault with surprising nuance and honesty without exploiting or glamorizing them. 

2) Empire of Dirt (2013)

Of the recent Native films I’ve watched, Empire of Dirt might make the Top 3. The film stars THREE indigenous women in leading roles in a modern setting who grow together by learning to love and forgive each other. Sometimes the acting falls flat in places but the overall story and interaction between the characters has a lot of sincerity. It’s one of those films that confronts a lot of Native hardships head on but does so in a healing, cathartic way. I also love how all three of the main characters are very flawed and make a lot of mistakes and bad decisions but are allowed to learn from them rather than be punished or demonized for it. 

3) Smoke Signals (1998)

Smoke Signals is a comedy, but don’t let that fool you. There are some very emotionally charged themes in this movie from alcoholism to domestic violence. The film handles these subjects honestly but with enough humor to take most of the edge off. 

4) Bury My Heart At Wounded Knee (2007)

This is the film that introduced me to Adam Beach. It is NOT a happy story but is a very important film to watch, especially in light of the protests at Standing Rock. The only thing I have a problem with is that there isn’t a native woman in a leading role (or many speaking roles, for that matter). Mentally prepare yourself before watching it if you think you’ll be too upset. 

5) Thunderheart (1992)

Thunderheart unfortunately casts a non-Native as the main character (who is supposed to be biracial, White and NDN) but the supporting cast are played by Native actors and Sheila Tousey is perfect as Maggie Eagle Bear. The film serves as an allegory for the Wounded Knee standoff in the 70s and is STILL relevant and important to this day. I would absolutely recommend. 


I hope this helped! 

Popham: The Forgotten Colony

It was founded the same year as Jamestown, Virginia, but you had probably never heard of it. Popham, Maine was started in 1607 by the Virginia Company of Plymouth, the second group of investors chartered by King James I to settle Virginia. The plan was the start this northern settlement as a shipbuilding colony, just south of French Canada, and presumably supply both the English and the French with all their ship-related needs.

Located just south of what is today Bath, Popham managed to survive its first Maine winter by the skin of its teeth: half of the 125 settlers chose to return to England as winter set in. Unfortunately, that was their first and only milestone. The founder George Popham died after the first winter, which was so discouraging that the remaining settlers packed up and headed back to England too!

Side note: the map below was what was planned. Archaeological excavations are currently ongoing, but it looks like they never finished the fort.

The one thing that Popham managed to do, in its year of existence, was build a 30-ton ship and christian it the Virginia. This ship was the first ship built by Europeans in North America. It was also the ship that the settlers used to get back home.

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           The Temple Of American Empire (New York Public Library)

The New York Public Library (NYPL) is a public library system in New York City. With nearly 53 million items, the New York Public Library is the second largest public library in the United States (behind the Library of Congress), and fourth largest in the world.[3] It is a private, non-governmental, independently managed, nonprofit corporation operating with both private and public financing.[4] The library has branches in the boroughs of Manhattan, The Bronx, and Staten Island, and affiliations with academic and professional libraries in the metropolitan area of New York State. The City of New York’s other two boroughs, Brooklyn and Queens, are served by the Brooklyn Public Library and the Queens Library, respectively. The branch libraries are open to the general public and consist of circulating libraries. The New York Public Library also has four research libraries which are open to the general public as well.

The library, officially chartered as The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundations, was developed in the 19th century, founded from an amalgamation of grass-roots libraries, and social libraries of bibliophiles and the wealthy, aided by the philanthropy of the wealthiest Americans of their age.he New York Public Library (NYPL) is a public library system in New York City. With nearly 53 million items, the New York Public Library is the second largest public library in the United States (behind the Library of Congress), and fourth largest in the world.[3] It is a private, non-governmental, independently managed, nonprofit corporation operating with both private and public financing.[4] The library has branches in the boroughs of Manhattan, The Bronx, and Staten Island, and affiliations with academic and professional libraries in the metropolitan area of New York State. The City of New York’s other two boroughs, Brooklyn and Queens, are served by the Brooklyn Public Library and the Queens Library, respectively. The branch libraries are open to the general public and consist of circulating libraries. The New York Public Library also has four research libraries which are open to the general public as well.The library, officially chartered as The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundations, was developed in the 19th century, founded from an amalgamation of grass-roots libraries, and social libraries of bibliophiles and the wealthy, aided by the philanthropy of the wealthiest Americans of their age.