the american 2010

Underwatched Animated Films I Recommend You See at Least Once in Your Life

EDIT: i didn’t expect this post to get so many notes. for the record, these are just my personal recommendations, not a definitive list of best underrated animation. i also did not include anything made by Disney. I know that they made some movies that didn’t get as much attention as their other hits, but lists of underwatched Disney films are pretty common, so I thought I’d make one of films by studios that aren’t household names. 

Angel’s Egg (1985)

This movie is a nearly silent film with painstakingly beautiful frames and environmental details. All I can say is that it is a real piece of art worth watching and can be watched on YouTube here.

Les Triplets de Belleville (The Triplets of Belleville) (2005)

An incredibly quirky, strange and humorous French film, also with almost no dialogue. The colors, creative storytelling, and almost caricature-like designs make the Triplets a must-see. The setting and timeframe is left sort of abstract, but it’s a clear transition from last-century rural France to the hustle and bustle of urban America. Lots of homage is paid to cartoons from the 1920s.

Mindgame (2004)

This movie, quite like the title says, blew my mind. It’s also incredibly strange and out-there, but the awkward imagery gives way to real emotion and huge payoff by the end. The colors and animation are delightful, and always tailored to the situation. It is an amazing intersection of an altered state, a love story, a struggle to get home, an existential trip, and an unlikely group of friends. I almost always cry when I watch this. Seriously, can’t stress this enough. There is absolutely nothing like Mindgame. 

Le Chat du Rabbin (The Rabbi’s Cat) (2011)

Rabbi’s Cat is a French film based on a French comic by the same name. The comic artist also directed the movie. Honestly, the dialogue  in this is unmatched. Both Cat and Rabbi are witty and have the best banter. The setting is one of the most unique and real-feeling I’ve ever seen a film take place in: a Jewish community in Algeria. It’s wonderful and incredibly charming, could not recommend more.

Tekkonkinkreet (2006)

This movie hits me on a number of levels. I have so much love for the two orphans, Black and White. The story quickly becomes raw and almost difficult, as it touches on a lot of the feelings we see in things like Grave of the Fireflies, but in a much more abstract way and on a much grander scale. Also less sad, but there are very sad parts also. I guess the best way to describe this movie is intense. While there are a lot of sweet, domestic moments, none of the gruesome reality is sugercoated for you. 

The visuals are all completely stunning; the art is on another level. Treasure Town is a rich, fantastical environment and the characters flow through it effortlessly, like water. You gotta see this at least once in your life. 

Chico and Rita (2010)

An American/Spanish romance between an aspiring piano player and a young singer. The film opens in Cuba and has a vibrant and unique visual style while exploring a multitude of music styles and cultural backdrops. It’s touching and sweet, but does not erase the hardships of being a black music star in America or living through the Castro regime. 

Wizards (1977)

Ralph Bakshi is notorious for underappreciated gems. Wizards is set in a post-apocalyptic fantasy world where magic is real and man has survived the radiation to evolve into fairies, elves, and dwarves. It’s a classic nature vs industry story with Bakshi’s unique spin. My favorite character is Necron 99, the assassin robot turned pacifist. I’ll warn you though, Bakshi films aren’t everyone’s taste (he’s responsible for Fritz the Cat, which against my better judgement I recommend as well).

Wizards was completed during the dark age of animation, and its fascinating to see how Bakshi gets around these limitations to produce something that grossed more than twice its budget.

Memories (1995)

Memories is a three part anthology based on three different manga short stories, Magnetic Rose, Stink Bomb, and Cannon Fodder. While the entirety of the movie is beautifully animated and worth the watch, the best of these is the first one. It is a mysterious, tragic sci-fi horror short film set in space and worked on by Satoshi Kon (so of course its amazing). 

youtube

do y’all know the person who plays freckle trolled american idol back in 2010 

Great lesbian TV show and film recommendations

Great lesbian films:

-          Imagine Me & You (2005, British)

-          Loving Annabelle (2006, American)

-          My Summer of Love (2004, British)

-          Black Swan (2010, American)

-          The Kids Are All Right (2010, American)

-          I Can’t Think Straight (2008, British)

-          Jenny’s Wedding (2015, American)

-          Lost And Delirious (2001, American)

-          Blue Is The Warmest Colour (2013, French)

-          The Secret Diaries of Miss Anne Lister (2010, British)

-          Carol (2015, American)

-          The Night Watch (2011, British)

-          Fingersmith (2005, British)

-          But I’m A Cheerleader (1999, American)

-          Tipping the Velvet (2002, British)

-          Gia (1998, American)

Great lesbian tv-shows:

-          The Fosters (2013-present, American)

-          Orphan Black (2013-present, Canadian)

-          Orange Is The New Black (2013-present, American)

-          The 100 (2014-present, American) (season 2 onwards)

-          Sugar Rush (2005-2006, British)

-          Grey’s Anatomy (2005-present, American) (season 5 onwards)

-          Glee (2009-2015, American) (season 3 onwards)

-          The L Word (2004-2009, American) 

-          Lip Service (2010-2012, British)

-          Skins (2007-2013, British) (seasons 3 & 4)

-          South of Nowhere (2005-2008, American) 

-          Sense8 (2015-present, American) 

-          Wynonna Earp (2016-present, American/Canadian)

-          Pretty Little Liars (2010-2017, American) 

-          Last Tango In Halifax (2012-present, British)

-          Banana (2015, British)

-          Faking It (2014-2016, American)

-          Bomb Girls (2012-2013, Canadian)

-          Black Mirror (2014-present, British, S3E4)

The rhetoric that demonizes anti-Latino and anti-Asian immigrants is disturbing not only for what it says, but more so for what it does not say. By portraying immigration to the United States as a matter of desperate individuals seeking opportunities, it completely disregards the aggressive roles that the U.S. government and U.S. corporations have played— through colonialism, imperialist wars and occupations, capital investment and material extraction in Third World countries and through active recruitment of racialized and gendered immigrant labor— in generating out-migration from key sending countries. As Joe Feagin reminds us, “recent immigrants have mostly come from countries that have been substantially influenced by imperialistic efforts by U.S. corporations and by the U.S. government around the globe.” This portrayal of immigration stigmatizes the immigrants as desperate, undeserving, and even threatening, and delinks contemporary immigration from past U.S. corporate, military, or governmental actions abroad.

As I watched this spectacle of border making, I was reminded of my own bordercrossing experience. In 1975, when tens of thousands of Vietnamese refugees, including my own family, arrived in the United States, the majority of Americans did not welcome us. A Harris poll taken in May 1975 indicated that more than 50 percent of the American public felt that Southeast Asian refugees should be excluded; only 26 percent favored their entry. Many seemed to share Congressman Burt Talcott’s conclusion that, “Damn it, we have too many Orientals.” Five years later, public opinion toward the refugees had not changed. A 1980 poll of American attitudes in nine cities revealed that nearly half of those surveyed believed that the Southeast Asian refugees should have settled in other Asian countries. This poll also found that more than 77 percent of the respondents would disapprove of the marriage of a Southeast Asian refugee into their family and 65 percent would not be willing to have a refugee as a guest in their home. Anti-Southeast Asian sentiment also took violent turns. Refugees from Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia in many parts of the United States have been attacked and even killed; and their properties have been vandalized, firebombed, or burned. The antirefugee rhetoric was similar to that directed against Latino immigrants: Southeast Asians were morally, culturally, and economically deficient— an invading multitude, unwanted and undeserving.

- Yen Le Espiritu, “Homes, Borders, and Possibilities,” in Asian American Studies Now (2010) 

Baby Driver

2017. Action Comedy-Drama

By Edgar Wright

Starring: Ansel Elgort, Kevin Spacey, Lily James, Jon Hamm, Eliza González, Jamie Foxx, Jon Bernthal, Flea, Lanny Joon, CJ Jones, Sky Ferreira, Lance Palmer

Country: United States, United Kingdom

Language: English, American Sign Language

6

Morgan Paige Brian// 24 years old


Individual Awards-

High school:

×Parade National Player of the Year: 2010
×NSCAA Youth Player of the Year: 2010
×NSCAA High School and Youth All-American: 2010
×ESPN Rise All-American: 2010
×Gatorade Georgia State Player of the Year: 2010, 2011

College:

×Soccer America National Freshman of the Year: 2011
×NSCAA All-American First Team: 2011, 2013, 2014
×Soccer America First Team MVP: 2011
×MAC Hermann Trophy Semifinalist: 2011
×NSCAA All-Southeast Region First Team: 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
×ACC Freshman of the Year: 2011
×All-ACC First Team: 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
×VaSID State Freshman of the Year: 2011
×ACC Tournament MVP: 2012
×Soccer America Second Team MVP: 2012
×TopDrawerSoccer.com Team of the Season, Second Team: 2012
×VaSID All-Sate First Team: 2012
×MAC Hermann Trophy Winner: 2013, 2014
×Soccer America Player of the Year: 2013
×TopDrawerSoccer.com Player of the Year: 2013
×Honda Award Nominee: 2013, 2014
×Soccer America First Team MVP: 2013, 2014
×TopDrawer Soccer.com Best XI First Team: 2013
×College Soccer Madness All-American First Team: 2013
×VaSID State Player of the Year: 2013, 2014
×All-NCAA Tournament Team: 2013, 2014
×ACC All-Tournament Team: 2013, 2014
×Virginia Nike Soccer Classic All-Tournament Team: 2013
×TopDrawerSoccer.com Preseason Best XI First Team: 2013, 2014
×TopDrawerSoccer.com National Player of the Year: 2014

International:

×U.S. Soccer Young Female Athlete of the Year Finalist: 2013
×2016 CONCACAF Women’s Olympic Qualifying Championship Golden Ball Winner

Team:

×2012 CONCACAF U-20 Women’s Championship
×2012 FIFA U-20 Women’s World Cup
×2014 CONCACAF Women’s Qualifying

Tournament:

×2015 Algarve Cup
×2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup
×2016 CONCACAF Women’s Olympic Qualifying
×2016 SheBelieves Cup

“In a context in which 95 percent of adoptees are girls, it is important to address questions of how racialized desire might intersect with the construction of Asian female bodies. Cheung (2000), for example, argues that in American cultural history Asian women have been endowed with an “excess” of womanhood (alongside the full manhood denied Asian men). And in China/U.S. adoption, mothers Deena Houston and Jackie Kovich were not alone in conjuring the image of beautiful, enthralling Chinese girls. Adoption agencies consistently use photos of cute, dolled-up Asian girls in their advertising; some use phrases such as “From China with Love” to attract would-be parents. Some of those prospective parents said they had become enchanted with their friends’ or neighbors’ Chinese girls. Margaret Jennings said she saw a photo of a Chinese adopted girl in the paper and “knew I wanted to adopt from China right then.” Some expressed embarrassment at what they suspected hinted at “racist love”— embrace of the “acceptable model” of the racial minority (Chan 1972, quoted in Cheung 2000: 309). Just days after she had met her daughter, Barbara and I were discussing what seemed among some new adoptive mothers an obsession with dolling up their daughters, when Barbara stopped to say in a low tone, “I hate to ask this, but are all the children beautiful? It seems like they’re all beautiful.”
—  Sara Dorow, “Why China?: Identifying Histories of Transnational Adoption,” Asian American Studies Now (2010)