the airglow

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Airglow waves. Do you you think our night sky is pitch black ? Have a look at this timelapse video. I captured it at Carnegie Las Campamas observatory. Those red waves are not clouds (!) - this is pretty intense airglow, which takes place in upper atmosphere. It’s very interesting to see how the waves move. While camera pans you will notice on the foreground both 6.5-m Magellan telescopes, as well as nicely setting Milky Way. I hope you’ll enjoy the view ! :) Music: “Airglow” by © Club 220

Hawaii, USA: This 23 image panorama captured what looks like some zodiacal light on the right side of the image, airglow, glow from Kilauea Cauldron, and the glow of Hilo on the left. Im not too sure about the red glow in the air on the left, writes photographer Shane Black.

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Galaxy Over the Dome by Neil Creek
Via Flickr:
A 380 megapixel panorama of the Milky Way Galaxy rising over the dome at Mount Burnett Observatory. I was there late one night recently, shooting the stars, when my telescope battery died. So I thought I’d try and capture an image I’ve had in my head for a while. This took me all day to process!

Galaxies from the Altiplano : The central bulge of our Milky Way Galaxy rises over the northern Chilean Atacama altiplano in this postcard from planet Earth. At an altitude of 4500 meters, the strange beauty of the desolate landscape could almost belong to another world though. Brownish red and yellow tinted sulfuric patches lie along the whitish salt flat beaches of the Salar de Aguas Calientes region. In the distance along the Argentina border is the stratovolcano Lastarria, its peak at 5700 meters . In the clear, dark sky above, stars, nebulae, and cosmic dust clouds in the Milky Way echo the colors of the altiplano at night. Extending the view across extragalactic space, the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds, satellite galaxies of the Milky Way, shine near the horizon through a faint greenish airglow. via NASA

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Airglow above European Southern Observatory (ESO)

Here are gorgeous fulldome views above different telescopes of ESO’s La Silla Observatory in northern Chile. The red and green hues are produced by airglow, waves of alternating air pressure which are caused by various processes in the upper atmosphere. The Large and Small Magellanic Clouds are also visible while Milky Way cuts across the sky.

Credit: P. Horálek/ESO

Puzzling a Sky over Argentina : Can you find the comet? True, a careful eye can find thousands of stars, tens of constellations, four planets, three galaxies, and the central band of our Milky Way Galaxy all visible in the sky of this spectacular 180-degree panorama. Also, if you know what to look for, you can identify pervasive green airglow, an earthly cloud, the south celestial pole, and even a distant cluster of stars. But these are all easier to find than Comet 252P/LINEAR. The featured image, taken in el Leoncito National Park, Argentina in early April, also features the dome of the Jorge Sahade telescope on the hill on the far right. Have you found the comet yet? If so, good for you , but really the harder thing to find is Small Cloud of Magellan. via NASA

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‘Cardigan Bay Nightscape’ - Snowdonia by Kris Williams
Via Flickr:
The Milky Way crossing the night sky over Barmouth and the Cardigan Bay, with the Llyn Peninsula in the distance, from the mountainsides of Snowdonia