the airedales

10

Quick side comparison of 10 dog skulls. More comparisons to come later! 

Top: French Bulldog 

Row 1: Shih Tzu x Miniature Poodle mix, Chihuahua puppy, Whippet 

Row 2: Airedale (male), Siberian Husky (male), Staffordshire Bull Terrier 

Row 3: Beagle (male), German Shepherd (female 1940s), German Shepherd (male, 2010s)

anonymous asked:

Hi! I don't know if you have experience with them but if you do, could you do a breed analysis of Airedale terriers? Thank you and I hope you have a great day 😊 also, a funny story as QT: my dog (an airedale) has to take allergy pills. He's learned that if he chews the food we put them in and spits the pills out he's going to get increasingly good food in an attempt to get him to take his meds. He's managed to manipulate all of us but it's not rly a major behavioural issue so we just humor him

I do have some experience with this breed, some of these individuals have come very close to biting me on several occasions and I’m no longer willing to trust any member of this breed. They are, rightly or wrongly, high on my ‘dogs that want to bite me’ list.

Please note the disclaimer that these posts are about the breed from a veterinary viewpoint as seen in clinical practice, i.e. the problems we are faced with. It’s not the be-all and end-all of the breed and is not to make a judgement about whether the breed is right for you. If you are asking for an opinion about these animals in a veterinary setting, that is what you will get. It’s not going to be all sunshine and cupcakes, and is not intended as a personal insult against your favorite breed. This is general advice for what is common, often with a scientific consensus but sometimes based on personal experiences, and is not a guarantee of what an individual dog is going to encounter in their life. 

Originally posted by mhysaofdragons

I saw these dogs so often for fur and skin problems through Summer. They were particularly bad at getting grass seeds lodged in themselves, I recall a particularly unpleasant case of one dog who managed to get them lodged in her vagina. To this day I still don’t know how, and they were a bugger to retrieve. They also commonly had skin allergies and moist dermatitis (hot spots).

These large terriers can present with hip dysplasia, though it’s not as common as in other larger breeds it is unusual to see in terriers. They see nto be a reasonably sound breed, skeleton-wise.

The breed is large and deep chested enough to develop gastric dilatation volvulus, an emergency condition where the stomach twists on itself. Usually this is seen in large and giant dogs, and new players in veterinary medicine may assume that a terrier breed wouldn’t get it, but they certainly can.

The breed might be a little iffy with endocrinopathies secondary to auto immune processes. I’ve seen my share of hypothyroidism and Addison’s disease in these dogs. This might just be the local population though.

And while I’ve not seen it personally, the breed will occasionally throw pups with pulmonic stenosis, a congenital heart defect that often presents as a murmur when the dogs are still puppies.

Breathe like a pug.

Pugs and their brachycephalic brethren have a long list of problems, but lets just talk about their airway for a second.

Pugs and other flat-faced dogs have, to varying extents, brachycephalic syndrome. The short version is that these dogs breathe REALLY badly. The long version is that they have up to half a dozen things wrong with their airway that narrows it.

Try this experiment: find yourself a straw, any will do, and breathe through it.
Only breathe through the straw. Try breathing quicker or slower and see how that feels.

How long does it take to become uncomfortable? Do you feel that instant relief when you finally breathe normally?

This is what it feels like for brachycephalic dogs to breathe. This is their reality. Their airway is narrowed, like yours was with the straw. They live like this. We breed them like this.

The sensation you were feeling is called air hunger. It’s beginning to be discussed more often as a welfare issue.

Brachycephalic syndrome consists of a number of abnormalities. Stenotic nares (closed nostrils) can be improved surgically, and affected dogs can still breathe through the mouth. A long soft palate reduces the diameter of the airway, and again can be improved surgically. The everted saccules, which may reduce the diameter of the airway by 50%, can also be removed surgically.

But you cannot fix the hypoplastic trachea. The dog’s windpipe may only be a fifth of the diameter it should be, perpetually restricting the dog’s breathing. They are forever forced to breathe through that straw. There’s nothing you can do about it.

A dog should have a nose. The disturbing trend of breeding flatter faced dogs has reduced the size if the skull, but hasn’t reduced the size of the tongue and soft tissues of the head. This flesh has nowhere to go, except to crowd the airway. Some pugs have so little nasal space that their nasal turbinates, the fine bones inside the nose responsible for the dog’s sense of smell, actually protrude backwards into the pharynx. Up to 30% of pugs were affected in one study.

Look at these skulls, one pug and one airedale terrier. 

The pug’s bones are smaller, and there’s less space within the skull, but both dogs will have the same amount of flesh on the head. On the terrier it will be fairly normal. On the pug it’s packed in like a sleeping bag.

Consider how far their tongue protrudes. That’s how long their skull should really be to be ‘normal’. That’s how much nose is missing.

A dog needs a nose. These free spirits deserve to be able to breathe freely. We should not be breeding dogs to have flat faces because we like the look of it.

If you think we should, then go breathe through a straw.

For twelve years.

Harry, Airedale Terrier (2 y/o), 14th & 5th Ave., New York, NY • “He’s eaten two collars – metal parts and all. The first time he had to have surgery, the second time he passed it.”

anonymous asked:

Do you know anything about Black Russian Terriers?

We’re going to do something new for asks! We will have “guest speakers” who will answer some of the fun fact asks for you. If no one’s @ is indicated, then it’s just me. Otherwise, I will let you know who has answered the ask at the bottom!

The Black Russian Terrier isn’t really a terrier in the small to medium sized dog sense. They are a large working breed. 

They originated in what is now Russia during the 1930s by a military kennel known as Red Star (based out of Moscow). They wanted to create a native breed to help the national security forces. Due to the upheaval of first the Russian Revolution of 1917, the economic depression of the late 1920s and 1930s, and then World War II, the program was a challenge. 

Following the war, it surged. The Red Star kennel used selective breeding of Giant Schnauzer, Rottweiler, Airedale, and Newfoundland, as well as 14 other breeds to create the breed we know today as the Black Russian Terrier. The BRT was bred for military and police work and by 1956, the Red Star Kennel had its breed. The first breed standard was created in 1958 but it wasn’t until 1981 that the Russian Ministry of Agriculture recognized the breed. It was international accepted by the FCI in 1984. In the United States, they are considered a rare breed. They are part of the working group under the AKC classifications.

These are NOT first time dog owner dogs. They large and strong dogs and need someone who has experience in training. They are very intelligent but can be aloof towards strangers and therefore continual training and socialization is needed. They come in one color, solid black (though a grey hair or two isn’t a problem). The males of this breed at maturity is between 27-30 inches and for females it’s between 26-29 inches. BRTs have a double coat and therefore do require daily brushing. 

Sources:

Here’s a great source for if you want a BRT: http://www.brtca.org/is-the-brt-right-for-you.html

Answered by: @wagrobanite