the academy of sciences

#REALTALK… how has sense8 never won an editing award? in fact, it’s never even been Nominated for an editing award… like?? a series featuring Eight leads from Eight different cities across the globe (all filmed ON LOCATION, with multiple global film crews!!) who literally weave in + out of each other’s environments, seamlessly taking over each other’s bodies + minds, all while trying to act without suspicion in their own real world surroundings… joseph jett sally, joe hobeck, fiona colbeck and their entire editing teams make this pseudo-time-travel, out-of-body plot device feel tangible and easy to follow, without ever making the audience feel lost or confused on which character to focus on… and none of this has ever been given any recognition within the industry. i am….. disgusted.

NOT SATIRE

People don’t take hurricanes as seriously if they have a feminine name and the consequences are deadly, finds a new groundbreaking study.

Female-named storms have historically killed more because people neither consider them as risky nor take the same precautions, the study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences concludes.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/capital-weather-gang/wp/2014/06/02/female-named-hurricanes-kill-more-than-male-because-people-dont-respect-them-study-finds/?utm_term=.9c6fba10068d

Meet America’s #NewAstronauts

We’re so excited to introduce America’s new astronauts! After evaluating a record number of applications, we’re proud to present our 2017 astronaut class!

These 12 new astronaut candidates were chosen from more than 18,300 people who submitted applications from December 2015 to February 2016. This was more than double the previous record of 8,000 set in 1978.

Meet them…

Kayla Barron

This Washington native graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy with a Bachelor’s degree in Systems Engineering. A Gates Cambridge Scholar, Barron earned a Master’s degree in Nuclear Engineering from the University of Cambridge.

She enjoys hiking, backpacking, running and reading.

Zena Cardman

Zena is a native of Virginia and completed a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology and Master of Science degree in Marine Sciences at The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Her research has focused on microorganisms in subsurface environments, ranging from caves to deep sea sediments.

In her free time, she enjoys canoeing, caving, raising backyard chickens and glider flying.

Raja Chari

Raja is an Iowa native and graduated from the U.S. Air Force Academy in 1999 with Bachelor’s degrees in Astronautical Engineering and Engineering Science. He continued on to earn a Master’s degree in Aeronautics and Astronautics from Massachusetts Institute of Technology and graduated from the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School.

He has accumulated more than 2,000 hours of flight time in the F-35, F-15, F-16 and F-18 including F-15E combat missions in Operation Iraqi Freedom.

Matthew Dominick

This Colorado native earned a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering from the University of San Diego and a Master of Science degree in Systems Engineering from the Naval Postgraduate School. He graduated from U.S. Naval Test Pilot School.

He has more than 1,600 hours of flight time in 28 aircraft, 400 carrier-arrested landigns and 61 combat missions.

Bob Hines

Bob is a Pennsylvania native and earned a Bachelor’s degree in Aerospace Engineering from Boston University. He is a graduate of the U.S. Air Force Test Pilot School, where he earned a Master’s degree in Flight Test Engineering. He continued on to earn a Master’s degree in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Alabama.

During the last five years, he has served as a research pilot at NASA’s Johnson Space Center.

Warren Hoburg

Nicknamed “Woody”, this Pennsylvania native earned a Bachelor’s degree in Aeronautics and Astronautics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and a Doctorate in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from the University of California, Berkley.

He is an avid rock climber, moutaineer and pilot.

Jonny Kim

This California native trained and operated as a Navy SEAL, completing more than 100 combat operations and earning a Silver Star and Bronze Star with Combat “V”. Afterward, he went on to complete a degree in Mathematics at the University of San Diego and a Doctorate of Medicine at Harvard Medical School.

His interests include spending time with his family, volunteering with non-profit vertern organizations, academic mentoring, working out and learning new skills.

Robb Kulin

Robb is an Alaska native and earned a Bachelor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Denver, before going on to complete a Master’s degree in Materials Science and a Doctorate in Engineering at the University of California, San Diego.

He is a private pilot and also enjoys playing piano, photography, packrafting, running, cycling, backcountry skiing and SCUBA diving.

Jasmin Moghbeli

This New York native earned a Bachlor’s degree in Aerospace Engineering with Information Technology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, followed by a Master’s degree in Aerospace Engineering from the Naval Postgraduate School.

She is also a distinguished graduate of the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School and has accumulated mofre than 1,600 hours of flight time and 150 combat missions.

Loral O’Hara

This Texas native earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Aerospace Engineering at the University of Kansas and a Master of Science degree in Aeronautics and Astronautics from Purdue University.

In her free time, she enjoys working in the garage, traveling, surfing, diving, flying, sailing, skiing, hiking/orienteering, caving, reading and painting.

Frank Rubio

Frank is a Florida native and graduated from the U.S. Military Academy and earned a Doctorate of Medicine from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences.

He is a board certified family physician and flight surgeon. At the time of his selection, he was serving in the 10th Special Forces Group (Airborne).

Jessica Watkins

This Colorado native earned a Bachelor’s degree in Geological and Environmental Sciences at Stanford University, and a Doctorate in Geology from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA).

She enjoys soccer, rock climbing, skiing and creative writing.

After completing two years of training, the new astronaut candidates could be assigned to missions performing research on the International Space Station, launching from American soil on spacecraft built by commercial companies, and launching on deep space missions on our new Orion spacecraft and Space Launch System rocket.

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com

huffingtonpost.com
Reminder: A Latina Has Never Won The Oscar For Best Actress
That's infuriating.

In fact, the last time a Latina was nominated for Best Actress was Catalina Sandino Moreno for “Maria Full of Grace” in 2004. That means it’s been 13 years since a Latina actress has even been nominated in the category.

And Latinxs have fared only slightly better in other categories. Rita Moreno, in 1962, and Mercedes Ruehl, in 1992, have been the only Latina actresses to take home an Oscar in the Best Supporting Actress category. The sole Latino to take home an Oscar for Best Actor was José Ferrer in 1950. While Anthony Quinn, in 1952 and 1946, and Benicio del Toro, in 2000, are the only Latino actors to win for a supporting role.

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced on Wednesday that it has invited over 700 new members to join its prestigious organization. Among its 774 new members are Wonder Woman star Gal Gadot, Oscar nominee Lin-Manuel Miranda, Dwayne Johnson, Chris Hemsworth, Priyanka Chopra, Leslie Jones, Amy Poehler, Betty White, Naomie Harris, Donald Glover, Riz Ahmed, Adam Driver, Chris Pratt, Anna Faris, Margot Robbie, Channing Tatum, Kristen Stewart, Shailene Woodley, Ruth Negga, Edgar Ramirez and many more.

This year’s number breaks 2016’s record of invitees, which was 683. The new members come from 57 different countries, with a 359% increase in women and 331% increase of people of color invited to join The Academy from 2015 to 2017.

Getting a bad teacher is always unfortunate, but you can still learn the material & manage to ace the exams! Even if they don’t teach you anything, they still might have resources you can use, and there are plenty of other ways to take your learning into your own hands.

Get resources from the teacher!

  1. Ask for a textbook to take home. If you don’t have a book or something similar, ask for your own book, an online textbook, or another resource that you can learn from.
  2. Get worksheets and practice problems. Teachers usually have really good resources, even if they aren’t good at what they do. Get relevant worksheets, online recommendations, or other resources.
  3. See if you can get help during free time. Ask your teacher if they have any open hours to get help, or ask specifically if you can go in during your lunch, or before or after school for extra assistance.

Learn from textbooks!

  1. Take very comprehensive notes. If you don’t have a good teacher, you’re going to need to get the material from somewhere, so your notes need to be extremely thorough.
  2. Use supplementary books. A lot of subjects– especially AP classes with standardized exams– have books from publishers like Barron’s, Kaplan, and Princeton Review to help you learn the information.
  3. Make flashcards & extra study tools. Since you don’t have the variety of learning methods you might in a good class, learning in every way you can is even more important to ensure that you do well!

Use online resources!

  1. Check YouTube for instructional videos. If you need to know about it, there’s a fantastic chance that YouTube has it. Standbys include Khan Academy, Bozeman Science, and Crash Course.
  2. Make use of masterposts. If someone has already compiled oodles of resources for you, they’re definitely worth checking out! Plus, if they’re student recommended, there’s a better chance that they’ll be helpful.
  3. Find free questions. Exam boards like the College Board publish questions (and answers!) online, and these are super useful for knowing how well you’re doing.

Ask for extra help!

  1. Talk to older students for tips. If they’ve been through the class before, they usually know what the teacher is missing out and also how to do well.
  2. See if your school has a tutoring programme. Some schools have teacher or peer tutoring programmes where you can get one-on-one help without having to pay for a more expensive professional tutor.
  3. Get a friend to help you. Don’t be afraid to reach out and ask for help! If your friend is a science genius and your physics teacher is atrocious, it’s always worth a shot to ask.

Good luck! You can still do fantastically, and hopefully you’ll have some better teachers next year.

With the help of high-speed cameras, CT scanners and some nail-art supplies, scientists in Japan have managed to catch a glimpse of the elaborate way that ladybugs fold their wings to tuck them away.

The research could have implications for everything from aeronautics to umbrellas.

The study, published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, explored how ladybugs can have wings strong enough to fly with, but quickly collapsible so they can be tucked out of the way.

The wings, after all, are much larger than the black-spotted wing cases they fold down to fit inside — as is immediately obvious easy to see if you just watch a video of the wings unfolding.

But the researchers at the University of Tokyo explain that no one knew how the ladybugs put the wings away, since they actually shut the wing cases first — then pull the wings inside. The interesting action is tucked out of sight.

Scientists Sneak A Peek At How Ladybugs Fold Their Wings

Photo: University of Tokyo

Today’s Google Doodle: Mary Pickford’s 125th Birthday

“Lights, camera, action! Today’s doodle honors the “Queen of the Movies,” Mary Pickford. An actress, a film director, and a producer, Mary Pickford proved that actors weren’t relegated to careers in front of the camera. She co-founded the film studio United Artists and was one of the original 36 founders of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

Before she became one of the most powerful women who has ever worked in Hollywood, she was “the girl with the curls,” and one of the most beloved stars of the silent film era. She appeared in as many as 50 films per year, and eventually negotiated wages that were equal to half of each of her films’ profits. She went on to demand full creative and financial control of her films, a feat still unheard of to this day.  She used her stardom to bring awareness to causes close to her heart. She sold Liberty Bonds during World War I, created the Motion Picture Relief Fund, and revolutionized the film industry by giving independent film producers a way to distribute their films outside the studio system. She won an Academy Award for Best Actress, for her role in Coquette (1929), and an honorary Academy Award for lifetime achievement in 1976.

Today, we pay tribute to Mary Pickford’s enterprising leadership on what would be her 125th birthday.”

For subjects like history, geography, business and even the sciences like biology and chemistry, a lot of content needs to be memorised! These are just a few of my tips on how to memorise all of the information you need before your exam.

Repeating over time- In the best scenario, studying for a test three weeks ahead is the most optimal way to study. Usually, the process is memorising chunks two weeks before and doing past papers the week of. However, more often than not, this doesn’t end up happening because the weeks get hectic/busy so the max time before a test is probably 1.5-2 weeks. The next few points are more catered to that time period!

Palm cards- This I feel is the most common way of memorising things, by putting information on palm cards and taking them around with you to study on the train, bus, or wherever you go. The cons of this is to make sure that you don’t copy the information onto them in a passive way. You learn it over again when you write it out so make that opportunity count!

Teach content to others- I have learnt over the past few years that this is one of my favourite ways to memorise- give a family member, friend or anyone (even your pets) the notes and teach them the topic, point by point. If you can’t explain a topic in a simple way where the other person can understand, it indicates that you haven’t learnt the information properly or enough to explain it in a test situation.

Film yourself- Another of my personal favourites, read over your information one palm card/paragraph/page at a time, turn on your phone camera or photobooth (on Mac) and film yourself talking like you’re in a Youtube video. If you do this a lot, it really helps because it’s almost as if you’re talking to someone else, and speaking it out loud helps you memorise.

Writing out notes- It’s best to actually type out/write out notes as you go in class, but before tests I usually handwrite them out again. This emphasises this in your mind and you can also ensure that you have learnt everything that is on the syllabus. Making them pretty is a plus!

Watch videos and Podcasts- Youtube has so many great videos on any topic. My favourites are Khan Academy (most subjects) , Crashcourse (science and history), Lisa Study Guides (English), Stated Clearly (Biology) and Eddie Woo (Maths). If you’re a visual/auditory learner, these really help because it feels like you are learning the lesson again.

Active textbook reading- Read over the text books and annotate/highlight. However, you need to ensure that you are actually reading the text, not just highlighting the words. 

I hope this helped anyone who has trouble memorising, good luck with all of your exams!

Jade

xx

Please boost!

For people in the Sanoma/Santa Rosa fires

For those displaced or know someone who is, please share this list of organizations offering the following for free.

FREE FOOD / WATER:

• Amy’s Drive Thru in Rohnert Park: Free meals to those evacuated.

• Nopalito: Free burritos from 11AM-3PM (1905 Bodega Avenue).

• McGuires: Free food.

• Mystic Theatre/McNears: Serving free breakfast 9AM-11AM, lunch (soup and sandwiches) from 12PM-3PM, and dinner from 5PM-8PM. They can deliver or make meals to go too. Contact them directly at 707-765-2121.

• Sauced BBQ Restaurant: Serving free food from 9AM-4PM and offering a place to rest.

• Quinua Restaurant: Serving free lunch.

• Lagunitas Tap Room: Giving away free water. Bring containers and they will fill them.

• Amy’s in Rohnert Park: Serving free food. All money donated there will be given to families in need.

• The Drawing Board: Offering food deliveries to those in need, plus a special menu for firefighters and victims.

FREE WIFI / COMPUTERS:

• Comcast FREE Internet/Comcast/Xfinity: Removed restrictions and opened their WiFi hotspots for all to use through Friday, 10/13. Log in as “Guest”.

• Copperfield’s Books Petaluma: Free wifi, allows dogs, water, stickers, and crayons for children.

• Mystic Theatre/McNears/The Roaring Donkey: Offering laptops to use if they need to get a hold of their financial institutions or family members. Ask for Sierra Bradley.

• Roaring Donkey: Has laptops with wifi and phone chargers.

FREE HEALTH / WELLNESS:

• Petaluma Swim Center: Offering free showers 8:30AM-10:30AM and 3:00PM-5:30PM. (Soap, shampoo, and towels provided.)

• Synergy Health Club: Offering free showers plus towels to those in need. As well as, indoor space away from the smoke.

FREE SPACE INDOORS:

• Adventure Recreation: Located at 2200 Petaluma Blvd. N. will be open until 6PM for kids to play indoor and away from all the smoke.

• Petaluma Bowling Alley: Offering a free space to be away from the smoke.

• California Academy of Sciences: Free, safe place for families during the day and indoors away from all the smoke.

PETS / ANIMAL BOARDING:

• Petaluma Animal Shelter Snuggle Shuttle @ Petaluma Community Center at Luchessi Park: Offering pet food, water, boarding, and lost and found pet information. (707-778-7387).

• Strong’s Second Chance Ranch: Offering to home horses. Can be reached via Messenger on Facebook.

• Chanslor Ranch Bodega Bay: Offering free beds and campsite. Kid and pet friendly. (707-875-2721).

• Sonoma Humane Society: Located at 5345 Highway 12 West, Santa Rosa. Taking in animals for boarding, lost and found animals. No cost vet treatment for burn victims, owned or stray animals affected by fires. Open 8AM-5PM.

• Unleashed Dog Training: Offering boarding. (707-763-9882).

• Marin Humane Society: Offering free boarding.

• Miscellaneous Animal Issues: Anyone encountering animal related issues can call 707-565-4406. This number will be available 24/7 until further notice. Donations can also be made through this line. Please be prepared to share information about the number of animals, type of animals, address and location for the animals, and any information about the families associated with the animals, if known.

3

“For Science!”

…Okay, I think I need to stop being so hard-working. I blame all of these on Avengers Academy. They are so evil(ly good job)!

Inspired by Tony. I-am-a-scientist-so-I-need-to-check-out-my-(boy)friend’s-bicep.Stark! :D (x) Seriously, can you go get married now pleaseeeeeeeee?

Btw, I am going to the Disneyland Iron Man Experience tomorrow!!! Awww so excited!!!

npr.org
How Frogs Benefited From The Dinosaurs' Extinction
Frogs are "master survivors," able to take advantage of the ecological vacuum left behind by extinct animals. Scientists say 9 in 10 frog species descended from three surviving frog lineages.

The asteroid that hit Earth 66 million years ago spelled disaster for the dinosaurs.

But scientists say they’ve found one silver lining to the mass extinction — turns out, it was really good for frogs.

The resilient animals date back some 200 million years. And in the aftermath of the extinction event, they survived and thrived, taking advantage of an ecological vacuum other animals left behind.

About 9 in 10 frog species today evolved from three frog lineages that survived the event, which occurred at the boundary between the Cretaceous and Paleogene periods, according to research published Monday in Proceedings of the National Academy of Science.