the tale of three brothers

What if besides Snape, Dumbledore and Harry, the Marauders correspond to the Three Brothers too? Peter, the first brother. Corrupted by a false idea of power and protection, given by a source immeasurably more powerful than him, constantly hurting people around him to maintain said power and, in the end, dead for it. Sirius, the second brother. The one whose loved ones are dead, the one arrogant and passionate enough to try overcome death, if given the chance, to bring his loved ones back. Remus, the third brother. The last one to die, who lived under invisibility after their brothers were gone, but who took it off once he knew his time to face death has come, in this case, in the battle of Hogwarts. James, the death itself. Where everything began and where everything will end. The legitimation for the first brother’s power, for the second brother’s desolation, for the third brother’s comfort to finally leave. The one waiting to greet the brothers after their deaths.

10

Harry Potter pop up shop by the designers of the movies

3

(inspired by The Tale of Three Brothers)

9

[a crow lands in the window]
Old Nan: Don’t listen to it. Crows are all liars. I know a story about a crow.
Bran Stark: I hate your stories.
Old Nan: I know a story about a boy who hated stories. I could tell you about Ser Duncan The Tall, those were always your favorites.
Bran Stark: Those weren’t my favorites. My favorites were the scary ones.
Old Nan: Oh my sweet summer child, what do you know about fear? Fear is for the winter, when the snows fall a hundred feet deep. Fear is for the long night, when the sun hides for years and children are born and live and die, all in darkness. That is the time for fear, my little lord, when the white walkers move through the woods. Thousands of years ago there came a night that lasted a generation. Kings froze to death in their castles, same as the shepherds in their huts. And women smothered their babies rather than see them starve, and wept and felt the tears freeze on their cheeks. So is this the sort of story you like?
[Bran nods]
Old Nan: In that darkness, the white walkers came for the first time. They swept through cities and kingdoms, riding their dead horses, hunting with their packs of pale spiders big as hounds…

honestly though hermione and ron would be the best parents ever

  • ron reading babbitty rabbitty and the tale of the three brothers and basically all of beedle the bard with just the right voices and funny inflections every bedtime
  • hermione ensuring that her children know the classic muggle fairy tales–with her own twist ofc–”now rosie, what does sleeping beauty teach us about the history of females and their status within literature?” 
  • ron tucking the kids in with a warm glass of milk and cookies; “never underestimate the value of good food, hugo”
  • hermione flipping pancakes in the morning in the shape of spell movements (”swish and flick, darlings! you too, ronald”)
  • ron taking rose out for her first broomstick ride while hugo clutches hermione’s hand fearfully
  • the kids growing up to saturday morning rituals of quidditch games with the Weasley cousins and sunday afternoon pot roasts with Grandma Weasley (”grandma, i’m full!” “nonsense!”)
  • holidays at the grangers’ in australia, ron making sure that they go hiking on every single nature preserve (”there’s no way that thing’s not magicked up, hermione, look at its stomach” “ronald, how many times do i have to tell you about the bloody kangaroo???”)
  • hermione coming home from a long day at work, ready to topple over, only to find ron, the kids, and a scrumptious steak dinner ready to go
  • ron taking first rose and then hugo with him to the joke shop and buying ice cream as a special treat and strolling down diagon alley, smiling and waving at everyone who knows the local shop proprietor
  • hermione taking them to gringotts, showing them the ins and outs of money, teaching them to value and save
  • both parents cementing their children’s open mindedness with exposure to both wizarding and muggle worlds, trying their best to make sure they understand the beauty and importance in both
  • the first time a boy pushes rosie on the playground and runs away, ron leaps up, furious, only to stand openmouthed as hermione races to the boy, sits him down, and looks on approvingly as rosie demands an apology and proud hermione rounds up all the kids for a lesson on expressing their feelings healthily (”not everyone has the emotional range of a teaspoon, ron” “hermione, are you ever going to let that–” “nope”)
  • wild car rides with ron at the helm, hermione clutching on to the seat rest with a firm look of disapproval and slight terror
  • ron and hermione trying their best to protect their children from the fame and paparazzi every day, refusing to allow them to be photographed; “my children make their own future, thank you very much” (hermione still keeps tabs on rita skeeter ofc)
  • yet never hiding their scars, “mudblood” and tentacle marks alike, answering the children’s questions readily and without reserve, because they have a right to know, to understand their history as a family and as a society
  • the house always bulging with books, food, and laughter
  • ron and hermione telling rose and hugo each and every day how much they love them, how precious and wonderful and smart and amazing they are
  • hugs always, everywhere and anywhere
  • yummy snacks and meals readily supplied by a doting grandmother and father
  • rose and hugo growing up, nurtured by love, shaped by wisdom, taught with compassion and fairness and trust
  • ron and hermione doing their best to raise their children to smile and not scowl, to be accepting and reasonable and kind always, to live their joyful childhood that was cut so short, praying and hoping and trying to make sure that, god forbid, nothing like their terrors will ever happen again
  • making mistakes and stumbling, but doing it all together with giggles and apologies and kisses
  • just hermione and ron as mum and dad, who fought for peace and live in it, thankful every day for the world they were able to create for their children.

There were once three brothers who were travelling along a lonely winding road at twilight. In time, the brothers reached a river, too treacherous to pass. But being learned in the magical arts, the three brothers simply waved their wands and made a bridge. Before they could cross, however, they found their path blocked by a hooded figure. It was Death. And he felt cheated. Cheated because travelers would normally drown in the river. But Death was cunning. He pretended to congratulate the three brothers on their magic, and said that each had earned a prize for having been clever enough to evade him. The oldest, asked for a more powerful wand than any in existence. So, Death fashioned him one from an Elder Tree that stood nearby. The second brother decided that he wanted to humiliate Death even further, and asked for the power to recall loved ones from the grave. So Death plucked a stone from the river, and offered it to him. Finally, Death turned to the third brother. A humble man, he asked for something that would allow him to go forth from that place without being followed by Death. And so it was that Death reluctantly handed over his own Cloak of Invisibility. The first brother traveled to a distant village, where with the Elder Wand in hand, he killed a wizard with whom he had once quarreled. Drunk, with the power that the Elder Wand had given him, he bragged of his invincibility. But that night, another wizard stole the wand, and slit the brother’s throat for good measure. And so Death took the first brother for his own.The second brother journeyed to his home, where he took the stone and turned it thrice in hand. To his delight, the girl he had once hoped to marry before her untimely death appeared before him. Yet soon she turned sad and cold for she did not belong in the mortal world. Driven mad with hopeless longing, the second brother hung himself so as to join her. And so Death took the second brother. As for the third brother, Death searched for many years but was never able to find him. Only when he attained a great age did the youngest brother shed the Cloak of Invisibility, and give it to his son. He then greeted Death as an old friend, and went with him gladly, departing this life, as equals.

all i can imagine is my future child reading harry potter (and loving it of course, it’s all in the genes hehe), specifically the deathly hallows and coming to me and being like wth??

because when they were little, the fairy tales they grew up to weren’t cinderella or snow white, but the fountain of fair fortune and the tale of the three brothers.

There were once three brothers who were traveling along a lonely, winding road at twilight. In time, the brothers reached a river too deep to wade through and too dangerous to swim across.. However, these brothers were learned in the magical arts, and so they simply waved their wands and made a bridge appear across the treacherous water. They were halfway across it when they found their path blocked by a hooded figure.

And Death spoke to them. He was angry that he had been cheated out of three new victims, for travelers usually drowned in the river. But Death was cunning. He pretended to congratulate the three brothers upon their magic and said that each had earned a prize for having been clever enough to evade him.


So the oldest brother, who was a combative man, asked for a wand more powerful than any in existence: a wand that must always win duels for its owner, a wand worthy of a wizard who had conquered Death! So Death crossed to an elder tree on the banks of the river, fashioned a wand from a branch that hung there, and gave it to the oldest brother.


Then the second brother, who was an arrogant man, decided that he wanted to humiliate Death still further, and asked for the power to recall others from Death. So Death picked up a stone from the riverbank and gave it to the second brother, and told him that the stone would have the power to bring back the dead.


And then Death asked the third and youngest brother what he would like. The youngest brother was the humblest and also the wisest of the brothers, and he did not trust Death. So he asked for something that would enable him to go forth from that place without being followed by Death. And death, most unwillingly, handed over his own Cloak of Invisibility.

Then Death stood aside and allowed the three brothers to continue on their way, and they did so, talking with wonder of the adventure they had had, and admiring Death’s gifts. In due course the brothers separated, each for his own destination.

The first brother traveled on for a week or more, and reaching a distant village, sought out a fellow wizard with whom he had a quarrel. Naturally with the Elder Wand as his weapon, he could not fail to win the duel that followed. Leaving his enemy dead upon the floor, the oldest brother proceeded to an inn, where he boasted loudly of the powerful wand he had snatched from Death himself, and of how it made him invincible.

That very night, another wizard crept upon the oldest brother as he lay, wine-sodden, upon his bed. The theif took the wand and, for good measure, slit the oldest brother’s throat.

And so Death took the first brother for his own.

Meanwhile, the second brother journeyed to his own home, where he lived alone. Here he took out the stone that had the power to recall the dead, and turned it thrice in his hand. To his amazement and his delight, the figure of the girl he had once hoped to marry, before her untimely death, appeared at once before him.

Yet she was sad and cold, separated from him as by a veil. Though she had returned to the mortal world, she did not truly belong there and suffered. Finally the second brother, driven mad with hopeless longing, killed himself so as truly to join her.

And so Death took the second brother for his own.

But though Death searched for the third brother for many years, he was never able to find him. It was only when he had attained a great age that the youngest brother finally took off the Cloak of Invisibility and gave it to his son. And then he greeted Death as an old friend, and went with him gladly, and, equals, they departed this life.

—  The Tale of the Three Brothers.