that summarises it

to summarise the Overwatch Artbook Drama for everyone rn
we missed out on:

tall black man with an hourglass figure in a nurturing, caring, support role as the saviour of the team with a rez skill and potentially still having a thing with genji b/c where are our gay male characters blizzard??

white mercy’s tunic as hospital scrubs, or least with pants and pockets instead of just… leggings and nothing practical whatsoever

gabriel as a BDSM ghost in a boob-revealing corset, a shirt with hip slits, or a literal studded thong

junkrat as vinny from the disney atlantis movie

mccree’s as a gross racist white dude? like… confederate flag and everything

lucio as a kingdom hearts character

Things from today's live show♡:
27/4/17

• phil: “There’s no DAWG… at the moment,”

• phil is keeping his bedroom aesthetic

• dan is changing is bedroom aesthetic

• he has a floating white bed ??

• he’s keeping all things silver !

•playing with cardboard boxes ,?,,

• chat: “when will you get a dog?” phil: “one day,”

• gaming video room has been set up !!

• mystery glass ??/

• dan in pink :))

• they touched the sydney opera house in AUS

• they watched fantastic beasts, lion, hacksaw ridge, nerve and snowden on the plane

• dan cried watching hacksaw ridge :’(

• had a little zoo trip

• the danisnotonfire desk is not in his bedroom and has been moved to the living room :?

• phil is still filming in his bedroom

• phil: “I requested a plant.” dan: “I bought a plant!”

• dan @ phil: “prepare inspirations for me,”

• SNUG (living room) !

• dan has a white piano !!

• “are you still trying to get revenge on me for the cereal?” “yes!”

• phil: “I know we can’t have a dog, but can we have a fish?”

• d&p talking about the science art museum and taking photos of eachother !

• dan cried at the show with the metal flower tree :“((((

• boomerangs at the aquarium !

• dan was given sparkley nail polish

• phil: “It just releases your pastely aesthetic,”

• phil: “I think I can probably get away with a fish or a hamster,”

• chat: “are you gonna curl you hair?” phil: “I think i’ll do it for a video at some point,”

• playlist live !

• phil is going to florida with the family

• harry’s new solo is phil’s favourite :))

• dan cried watching the last gaming video, back :’((((((

• some videos next week !!

• favourite room; gaming room !

• phil’s new room is “cozy and quiet” ♡

• dan: “I want to make the new danisnotonfire background, pretty” ♡

• dan has a bonsai !

• dan has an idea for a new dinof video (ooo)

• he has one final video in his old room

• dan said he purposely gave us hints about them moving in his last younow (we all knew lmao)

• phil called dans hair soft and poked it

• phil: “if i had natural curls i’d let them curl”

• the new apartment is called steve/dave/thor

• dan: “phil why won’t you paint your nails?”

• someone at phil’s university painted his nails and he didn’t like it :( (rip)

• probably a dinof video on monday and dans live show on tuesday !

• phil will try to do one in florida !

• “we’re just two irrelevant twits; dan and phil”

Back to School: How to Get an A*/8 or 9 in an English Lit Essay!

Happy September, everyone!

As we all get our gears in motion to start a new year, I thought I would share my top tips for scoring the highest marks in English Literature essays. 

(P.S. Lots of these tips are applicable to other subjects too)


1. Don’t write about the character as if they are real

Unfortunately, this is a common error in English Lit essays. It is absolutely imperative to remember that a character is not a person, but is a construct of the writer in order to present an idea or theme. No matter the question, you should be linking your answer back to the writer’s ideas and theme of the text, even if it doesn’t seem obvious what the theme is on the first inspection of the question. Using the author’s name frequently in your essay will demonstrate that you recognise the character is not a real person - ‘Shakespeare portrays Macbeth as a tragic hero, as defined by Aristotle as…’

2. Don’t analyse the plot

Avoid analysing the plot or when things happen in the text. Don’t write ‘When X happens it makes us think Y’. Instead:

  • Analyse the writer’s use of language, structure and form to create meaning
  • Do a close language analysis of specific words/phrases, including a sound analysis (plosives, assonance, etc.)
  • Do a structural analysis of what happens when and why that’s important (Freytag’s pyramid)
  • Do an analysis of form (stage directions, dramatic monologue, etc.)

3. Keep your answer relevant throughout

You need to be explicitly answering the question - not going off on a tangent nor trying to change the question to suit an answer that you want to write. One way of avoiding this is by starting each paragraph with a topic sentence, summarising what that paragraph is going to be about and how it answers the question. Another method is simply by rewording the question into your answer at the start and end of every paragraph. At least. For greater impact, include synonyms of the word, which can also help with the readability of your answer.

4. Avoid PEE/PEEL/etc. where you can

Thousands of students are taught the same, basic Point-Evidence-Explain (or variant) analytical paragraph structure. If you want to stand out, show academic strength, and achieve the highest marks then you must break free from the chains of PEE! (This also applies for your introduction format. ‘In this essay, I will argue…’ gets pretty dull after reading it 100 times)

For my students, I will be teaching them to write What-How-Why paragraphs:

WHAT has the writer done?

HOW have they done it?

WHY have they done it/is it effective?

This way, your focus is always on why the writer has chosen to use that specific language/structure/form, but it allows you to be creative in crafting your response. Being able to discuss the ‘why’ of literature is the key to unlocking the highest grades. Reading through examiners’ reports this summer has made one thing clear - it is not enough to merely spot linguistic devices or structural features. You must explain why the writer has chosen them and why that is an effective choice (or not).

5. Avoid sweeping statements about context

The main advice here is to only include comments about the context of the text if it adds to the analytical point that you are making. They should not be a bolt-on sentence, but they should enhance your answer.

Further, sweeping claims like ‘All Jacobean women were oppressed by society’ is far too vague. On the other hand, a comment like ‘Lady Macbeth is a disturbing example of womanhood because she denies her gender at a time where the role of a woman was clear-cut, even patriarchal, in Jacobean society’ suggests that you have a greater understanding of how context can influence the writer’s choices.

6. A plan is your best friend

Always, always make time to plan your answer. A method I recommend is, first, circling the key words in the question (character/theme, what you are asked to do, where in the text you are asked to look, etc.). Secondly, write all of your ideas down onto the page, highlighting parts from the extract if you have that in front of you. Finally, select a judicious number of points that you are going to talk about (quality not quantity here) and number the order in which you are going to make them.

If you are writing a comparative essay, each paragraph must start and end with a comparative point about whatever it is you are comparing (characters/themes/etc.) I suggest the following format:

X is presented in both text A and text B. However, in A the author uses device 1 and 2 to demonstrate X. On the other hand, in B, the author demonstrates X via use of device 2 and 3.’ Then write one paragraph for each text. Repeat this again for another similarity. And again for a third - if you think that is appropriate.


Photo credit @eintsein 🌻

#optomstudies here with a post about university studying! I’ve been reading many study tips masterposts in the community, but some of these won’t work that well for university. So here are 3 tips for adapting to uni study!

Loose leaf? Notebook? Neither! (but if you must choose between the two, I recommend hole-punched loose leaf - easy to file :D) There is just no time, especially once you get to your higher years, that you will be able to write paper notes especially considering the level of detail that you are required to learn things to get good marks. 

When I was studying therapeutics, lectures were more like an essay crammed into 60-80 ppt slides! Using 10pt Calibri, 1.15 spacing, custom 1cm margins - I still had 12 pages for a 2 hour lecture (see below)

Two lectures / week, for 12 weeks! Although this was the most-content heavy subject, my other courses were still way too time consuming to write notes for. Sadly, you can’t summarise much, because MCQs pick at details.  

As for laptops, cheap netbooks are only ~$300, but I’d recommend these really great student laptops

And yet, you have to wonder why #studyblr doesn’t have more digital notes? Isn’t every studyblr the owner of a computer as a tumblr user? I’m trying to encourage everyone to feel more confident about posting their digital notes as part of the “#studyblrs get real” tag (see here), so if you have some great typed study notes, please tag me with #optomstudies and I’ll be happy to reblog you!

Read through your lecture slides so that you have a basic grasp of the topic before classes. If you have any readings assigned, do them too. This means that you’ll

  • go in knowing what concepts you need clarified
  • revise one more time (remember the forgetting curve?)
  • be much better placed to answer questions and participate in class discussions (get those participation marks!! ;))
  • find it easier to follow along with much more complicated topics than you’ve experienced in high school!
  • remember a lot more of the topic when you come back to revise later on!

Yes, I know, studyblr blasphemy right? But this is what you do when strapped for time. Particularly with biological/chemical sciences, lecturers will have basically summarised what you need to know on the slides. 

Before your lectures, read through the slides (should take about 30 minutes for a 2 hour lecture) and mark/circle anything you don’t understand - then when you get to the lecture, jot down a clarification in your own words based on the professor’s explanation. Eventually, you’ll find that you have studied the topic well enough to not need your own footnotes. 

It takes a little experience to know which professors have slides you can study off (tip: it’s usually the ones where you don’t have to write down much) but it’s totally worth the time you save!


Hope this has been an informative post about the differences between university and high school studying! Please follow me for weekly study tips, study pics and now kpop vocab lists!


MY WEEKLY STUDY TIPS

WHAT I WISH I’D KNOWN BEFORE UNIVERSITY STUDY TIPS SERIES

SEE ALSO My Tips This Past Month - It’s too long to list everything, see all original posts here and my study tips directory (web)

 + my cute stationery + my spreads!

anonymous asked:

How do u think Taekook is real? why?

First of all, let me clarify that I when I say taekook is “real”, I don’t mean it in an enforcing and “suck that!” manner. It’s more of a “I believe in the possibility of my OTP” reaction and I’m not trying to say that they really ARE in a relationship IRL. (See this post) I want to be able to scream and smile over taekook all I want without people thinking I’m that offensive, rude and crassy-ass shipper :^) just want to make it clear that I am open to different ships and wouldn’t directly harass another ship.

Now that that’s out of the way, let’s get on to the good stuff ;) Taekook is the ship closest to my heart because of their interactions. I’ve always believed in the possibility of taekook harbouring romantic feelings towards each other. It’s the constant skinship with each other, the intense looks exchanged. It’s them cuddling together in each others’ beds, and the playful touches. It’s when Jungkook looks jealous whenever Taehyung interacts with others. It’s when Taehyung jumps onto Jungkook for a piggyback ride and when Jungkook obliges happily.

It’s also the way they seem to gravitate towards each other, a lack of distance  whenever they’re standing side by side. The way they tease playfully, the way one licks their lips while staring at the other. The way they seem so comfortable around each other, lingering glances and touches exchanged. There’s so many more I want to list out, but I think you get the idea. Something tells me that they might be more than just friends.

Remember the way taekook hold hands? Fingers intertwined, like it’s second nature to them. 

Originally posted by bbminnie

Do you recall them cuddling? In beds and on mats, the intimacy kills me.

Originally posted by jimin-stole-the-jams

Originally posted by jeonvguk

Space? Well, not really.

Originally posted by taevia

Originally posted by thereisalwaysachogiway

What’s this? Yes please.

Originally posted by hayoomin

Originally posted by donewithjeon

Originally posted by beuits

Besides, have you seen the way they look into each others’ eyes? It’s as if they hold the world.

Originally posted by bloodsweatearss

Originally posted by allthingstaekook

Originally posted by xtaeful

@lowaharts did this beautiful sketch of Lance and Hunk from the earlier chapters of Watercast. She says this is probably going to remain a WIP and I that can post it…but i think it is so amazing as it is ;3; their expressions summarise their personalities and friendship so well omg…I love it so much!!!

Fic can be found on AO3 | Latest updated is chapter 11.

9

@actuallyadhd

[Image Descriptions:

All slides have a light blue background, and the text is written in blue rectangles with rounded corners.

Slide 1: The title is in white text inside a dark blue circle that is centred in the slide.

Sensory Overload And how to cope

Slide 2: The header is in a dark blue rectangle and white text, and the body is in a pale blue rectangle and black text.

Sensory overload has been found to be associated with disorders such as:

  • Fibromyalgia (FM)
  • Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS)
  • Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
  • Autistic spectrum disorders
  • Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD)
  • Synesthesia

Slide 3: The text is in three pale blue rectangles that go horizontally across the slide. All use black text. The last rectangle has four smaller dark blue rectangles with white text inside it for the four points. The text is centred in all of the rectangles.

Sensory overload occurs when one (or more) of the body’s senses experiences over-stimulation from the environment.

Basically it feels like everything is happening at once, and is happening too fast for you to keep up with.

Sensory overload can result from the overstimulation of any of the senses.

Hearing: Loud noise or sound from multiple sources, such as several people talking at once.

Sight: Bright lights, strobe lights, or environments with lots of movement such as crowds or frequent scene changes on TV.

Smell and Taste: Strong aromas or spicy foods.

Touch: Tactile sensations such as being touched by another person or the feel of cloth on skin.

Slide 4: A heading in two light blue rectangles with black text, followed by a table with a dark blue first row that has white text, and then alternating pale blue and white rows with black text. (The table is not really a table, it is just a four-column list.)

Obviously, everyone reacts in differently to sensory overload.

Some behavioural examples are:

Irritability — “Shutting down” — Covers eyes around bright lights — Difficulty concentrating
Angry outbursts — Refuses to interact and participate — Covers ears to close out sounds or voices — Jumping from task to task without completing
Overexcitement — Low energy levels — Difficulty speaking — Compains about noises not effecting others
High energy levels — Sleepiness/fatigue — poor eye contact — Overly sensitive to sounds/lights/touch
Fidgeting and restlessness — Avoids touching/being touched — Muscle tension — Difficulty with social interactions

Slide 5: The header is in a dark blue box with pointy corners and white text. The body is in a pale blue box with pointy corners and black text.

There are two different methods to prevent sensory overload: avoidance and setting limits:

  • Create a more quiet and orderly environment - keeping the noise to a minimum and reducing the sense of clutter.
  • Rest before big events.
  • Focus your attention and energy on one thing at a time.
  • Restrict time spent on various activities.
  • Select settings to avoid crowds and noise.
  • One may also limit interactions with specific people to help prevent sensory overload.

Slide 6: This looks the same as the last slide except the text in the header is black.

It is important in situations of sensory overload to calm oneself and return to a normal level.

  • Remove yourself from the situation.
  • Deep pressure against the skin combined with proprioceptive input that stimulates the receptors in the joints and ligaments often calms the nervous system.
  • Reducing sensory input such as eliminating distressing sounds and lowering the lights can help.
  • Calming, focusing music works for some.
  • Take an extended rest if a quick break doesn’t relieve the problem.

Slide 7: Four light blue rectangles with rounded corners, stacked one above the other, with black text.

What if someone you know is experiencing sensory overload?

Recognize the onset of overload. If they appear to have lost abilities that they usually have, such as forgetting how to speak, this is often a sign of severe overload.

Reduce the noise level. If they are in a noisy area, offer to guide them somewhere more quiet. Give time to process questions and respond, because overload tends to slow processing. If you can control the noise level, for example by turning off music, do so.

Do not touch or crowd them. Many people in SO are hypersensitive to touch - being touched or thinking they are about to be touched can worsen the overload. If they are seated or are a small child, get down to their level instead of looming above them.

Slide 8: Similar to previous slide, only with three rectangles instead of four.

Don’t talk more than necessary. Ask if you need to in order to help, but don’t try to say something reassuring or get them talking about something else. Speech is sensory input, and can worsen overload.

If they have a jacket, they may want to put it on and put the hood up. This helps to reduce stimulation, and many people find the weight of a jacket comforting. If their jacket is not within reach, ask them if they want you to bring it. A heavy blanket can also help in a similar way.

Don’t react to aggression. Don’t take it personally. It is rare for someone who is overloaded to cause serious harm, because they don’t want to hurt you, just get out of the situation. Aggression often occurs because you tried to touched/restrained/blocked their escape.

Slide 9: Similar to previous slide, only with two rectangles instead of three.

When they have calmed down, be aware that they will often be tired and more susceptible to overload for quite awhile afterwards. It can take hours or days to fully recover from an episode of sensory overload. If you can, try to reduce stress occurring later on as well.

If they start self-injuring, you should usually not try to stop them. Restraint is likely to make their overload worse. Only intervene if they are doing something that could cause serious injury, such as hard biting or banging their head. It’s a lot better to deal with self-injury indirectly by lowering overload.

Slide 10: The header is in a dark blue rectangle with white text, and the other text is in a row of five dark blue circles with white text. The text is centred in all shapes.

To summarise - Remember the 5 R’s

Recognise
The symptoms of overload

Remove
Yourself from the situation

Reduce
the stimulus causing the overload

Relax
Your body and calm yourself down

Rest
Yourself as you will most likely feel fatigue.]

  • To summarise
  • Season 1: Stefan falls in love with Elena. Damon rocks up and tried to tear that happiness away by either killing her or by "stealing her" from him (his words).
  • Season 2: Damon fucks up. Stefan ends up sacrificing himself to save Damon.
  • Season 3: Stefan is with Klaus, a price he agreed to pay in order to save Damon. He's also trying to keep Klaus away from figuring out that Elena is still alive. Meanwhile, Damon is doing everything in his power to make Elena fall for him.
  • Season 4: Elena and Stefan break up because she admits to having feelings for Damon. He's heartbroken, Damon admits to being gleeful. Stefan kidnapped, thrown in the ocean to die over and over again.
  • Season 5: Still drowning. Eventually found, but brain fried. Soz bro
  • Season 6: Downward spiral because he lost his brother. Pretty sure this is the season Enzo was obsessed with him.
  • Season 7: Saves Damon from being killed by the Huntress, ends up marked and leaving his new gf to be on the run
  • Season 8: Damon gets into shit. Gives up and forces Stefan to become a ripper to save the twins. Stefan makes ONE mistake and suddenly is the unforgivable villain. Sacrifices his life so that everyone else gets to be happy and after a few minutes no one even gave a shit.
  • That's his story y'all and I've left a lot of tragedy out. Fuck you writers for not giving happiness to the guy who's sacrificed the most (aside from Bon) over and over again.

anonymous asked:

Hey Emma 💛 Do you have any advice for procrastination? I also have a hard time concentrating, what do you do (or think I could do) that would help with that?

Hi! I’ve had a few questions like this recently so I’m just going to answer this one and hopefully anyone who asked a similar question will see it! But on with the answer. I think there is a few different reasons why we procrastinate so I’m going to note those down and give a few tips for each. You can obviously apply any ideas that you like regardless of what section I’ve put them under! 

1. You’ve got poor work/productivity habits. Generally you leave things until the last minute since you “work better under pressure”. (This is so me, omg.) You probably think you’ll do something after you’ve finished something else, and then never do. You get distracted whenever you’re trying to study and will sit waiting to feel motivated but it never comes. For this I’d suggest:

  • create a productive work environment - choose a space where you will actually work without distractions, organise your study space, have everything you need in easy reach. Surround yourself with things you find motivating such as quotes! 
  • write it out - write down a few manageable tasks that you need to do. Writing the actions they require will help you see what you should be doing to complete something, instead of just the overall task. One by one you’ll see yourself getting things done!
  • focus on 20-30 minute periods - generally we lose focus after a while so taking regular breaks can help give you chance to relax and refocus. Apps like Forest allow you to set a timer and will give you off your phone at the same time. Obviously if you’re being productive, don’t suddenly cut that off because it is “time for a break”.
  • use apps/browser extensions to cut out distractions - ones like RescueTime or StayFocusd will block you from checking certain sites.
  • find an accountability partner - pick someone who you can rely on to check on your regularly and see how your tasks are coming along. You can send them your to-do list and then every few hours you can update them with your progress. You won’t want to let them down.
  • use the two-minute rule - if something takes less than two minutes, do it. Don’t make an excuse, just do it. Tasks that are longer you can either delegate or defer. Here is a simple visualisation of what I mean.
  • record your progress - doing a simple “don’t break the chain” in your planner is a great way to see how productive you’re being and therefore get you more motivated to keep it up!

2. You’re feeling stressed and overwhelmed. Everything seems to be mounting up and nothing seems doable. You don’t know where or how to start. For this I’d suggest:

  • find some help - if you’re feeling like this, it is likely you need some help in some form or another. See if a family member, friend, classmate or teacher (or Google) can help or give you a starting point.
  • tell yourself that getting started is the first step - you don’t need to finish a task in a matter of minutes. Start doing something small. Maybe organise what you need, highlight the important bits of your assessment, or draft an essay plan. The secret to getting ahead is getting started!
  • divide and conquer - figure out what is the overall task that you need to do and split it into manageable parts. For instance with an essay the aim is to write it! Divide it into planning out what you want to write, any references you need, summarising a final draft and then writing each paragraph. By dividing bigger tasks into actionable parts you can reduce the obstacles and get through each part in a more timely manner.
  • reward yourself - create a reward system to celebrate completing a selection of tasks. By rewarding your progress you’ll build an incentive to work and reinforce productivity (great for your self-discipline!). 
  • learn to forgive yourself - if you have an off day, that is okay! You can’t expect to see a huge change in a short amount of time. Remember to come back to it later and try again.
  • don’t over schedule - if you’re feeling pressure from the amount of work and then the added pressure of trying to stick to a time limit, you’re just going to go crazy. Set yourself flexible times to get something done instead of being heavily structured. Give yourself time for a break and the ability to change tasks.
  • stick with one task - it can be so tempting to multitask but try not to. Try to keep focus on the what you’re doing until it is done. If you struggle with that, you could write down anything useful that you randomly think about for another task, use a break-time to think about that other task or alternate between subjects/tasks every few hours.

3. You’re a perfectionist. You either don’t want to start something out of fear you won’t get it right or you can stuck on stuck on the small details. There is a pressure to achieve “perfection”. For this I’d suggest:

  • focus on getting started, instead of finishing - it is easy to get overwhelmed thinking about what something is supposed to be like finished if you’re a perfectionist. Take things one step at a time.
  • remember that your perfectionist tendencies aren’t actually improving your work or productivity but hindering you - you’re continually setting yourself unrealistic objects and (like me) probably feel let down by yourself if you don’t reach them. Be realistic and focus on getting it done!
  • accept mistakes - you’ve written something wrong, don’t panic! Cross it out with a single line and move on. Things happen and you have to accept it. You can’t rip up the page every time you do something wrong, even if it is so tempting.
  • put things in perspective - is what you’re beating yourself up about right now going to mean anything in a week, a month, a year? Be honest if it isn’t, is it really worth putting unnecessary pressure on yourself.
  • praise yourself through the process - try not to criticise yourself but recognise your progress. 

4. You’re wanting to do something else. You find whatever you’re doing boring. You want it to be over with but don’t want to get started. The ultimate catch 22, right? For this I’d suggest:

  • remember that putting it off isn’t going to make it go away - if you leave it too long you’ll end up getting more stressed about it. Best to get it over with. 
  • plan from the get-go - once you know something is coming up (e.g. a test, an assessment, etc) make notes on it! That could be questions, annotations, potential topics, citations, etc. By making the effort to spend time reading through, you’ll save your future self some stress. Especially if it’s a topic you have forgotten. That way your notes act as a reminder so you can get started.
  • set a finish time with a reward - tell yourself that if you finish something by ..am/pm and then you can do something else. Use your self-discipline to not go back on this. Set a realistic time and try to get it complete before. If you can think that you’re doing something fun once it is completed, you’ll be more motivated to get it done.
  • make a structure - for note-taking, it can be overwhelming looking at a textbook and thinking what you’re going to write out. Make a note-taking layout/colour code that works for you and that subject. Mine is here - it just give me an idea of how I’d lay everything instead of going in with no action plan. 
  • try to make it fun - this could be using YouTube to learn or starting a study group. Use different methods for memorising information such as flashcards, mindmaps or study guides (like question/answer).
  • make the effort to refocus - if you’re finding something boring and you’re unfocused, walk away for 5 minutes, get a drink and come back. If you’re really struggling, change topics for a while. Find a point where you can finish and start doing something else that is productive. 
  • listen to some music - generally music without lyrics are best for focusing. Spotify has a great playlist for studying called ‘focus’. However I find my regular music good for getting me a little more motivated and awake. I also like writing essays to music because I weirdly sort of type in the same rhythm. Funny study hack I’ve found that works for me haha! 

I hope that is useful! I must have copied and pasted my whole answer like 5 times just incase my tab reloaded and I lost everything, luckily not! You should also check out this post for smaller motivation tips and tricks! xx

Ok so I’ve finally gotten around to doing this highly requested post based off this post and I’m sorry to all those who had been waiting for ages for it to come out but here it is!!!

How to Annotate a Novel Efficiently

Look I’m actually doing the play Medea at the moment so this can be used for other texts apart from novels too!

Like I’ve said before, I know lots of people don’t want to taint their texts with writing and highlighting, but to me, it is so so satisfying when I finish with a fully annotated book with tabs flying out of every page and all that, plus it acts as a sweet resource once it’s done.

((Hopefully by the time you’ve gotten around to this level of annotating, you’ve read through your text already and maybe even put down some initial thoughts in the margins.))

To put it simply, I have three levels of coordination when it comes to annotating a novel: words, tabs and sticky notes.

1. Sticky notes

  • Use for big chunks of text you can’t fit in the margins of your book, such as summaries of characters, themes, etc
  • They can also get those big chunks of info to stand out from the rest of the novel
  •  If you’re reading a larger text with chapters, it’s quite handy to use big sticky notes to summarise each section. 


2. Tabs (and highlighting)

  • Yep so these are the tabs I have sticking out of my book and they’re used for quick references, where I can easily search up a type of quote quickly in the novel without having to flip through every page.
  • The colours of the tabs I use are the same colours as my highlighters, so it is easy to see where the quote is and which tab it corresponds to.
  • ACTUALLY HIGHLIGHT the specific quote rather than leaving a tab there by itself, for future reference when you need a specific quote, but if you’ve got a massive chunk that is just too important to pick out a small quote, use a square bracket on the inside margin. Smaller quotes are better.
  • Have a tab for broad topics such as characters, themes, literary devices, plot developments, context, etc. If you have more colours, you can always make your categories more specific (for me, the character of Medea is separate to the rest of the characters)
  • I write the main idea on the tab itself, a.k.a. the reason why I highlighted or tabbed that quote there.
  • Which quotes to highlight depends on

a)     What we go through in class

b)     What is written as an important quote in the text guide we are given/the internet suggests

c)     What I think is important. If you’re not sure, ask yourself WHY is that quote important and if you can answer that, highlight it!!!

 

3. Words

  • The further explanation of quotes is written on the actual pages, and often right under a tab to elaborate.
  • I recommend using a thin pen as in 0.38 to really fit in as much as possible.
  • This step as well as tabbing is so so important, because you can highlight as much as you want, but it really won’t mean anything until you’ve written down its significance, and even if you have an amazing memory, this is vital ok. Even a few words along the margin explaining the quote can mean the difference between good writing and great writing in your upcoming essay.
  • What do I actually write? If it’s a literary device, I’ll name it (e.g. Metaphor) and explain its symbolism, or the author’s intention for putting that in. If it’s a theme related quote, I’ll explain the message that the author is trying to convey through that quote. If it’s a character related quote, I’ll explain how that quote adds to their character, maybe finding contrasts, etc.
  • Supplies that I used were:

- Mildliners (pink, orange, yellow, blue, aqua; gotta get that colour coding)

- Pilot Frixion Point

- Uni-ball Signo TSI (erasable like the frixion pen so that if I’m not too sure about what I’ve written as an annotation, I can check with the teacher and erase if need be)

- A set of 1000 tabs in total, divided among pink, orange, yellow, green and blue

- Pastel square sticky notes

As an optional step, I highly recommend making use of the back cover or spare pages in the book. I use them for writing definitions of recurring words, good vocabulary to use in the future when writing the essay and also character maps, explaining the relationship between each character.

I hope you all find this helpful!

((disclaimer: this is just how I do it so don’t shank me pls))

Kate xx

20 Out Of This World Facts About The Universe That Will Sweep You Off Your Feet

We’ve compiled a list of the 20 most incredible facts about the universe you will ever come across. The infinite expanse of stars and galaxies are riddled with mysteries which leading scientists and experts are yet to explore. In their quest to unearth the hidden secret of the universe, startling facts and information have emerged - 20 of which we’ve featured below.

1. When you look into the night sky, you are looking back in time.

Originally posted by apparently-artless

 When we gaze at stars in the night sky, we are actually looking into the past. This happens because light emitted from a star has to travels many light years ahead to actually become visible to our eyes. For  example, Orion is 640 light-years away, so the light left the star around 1370 is what we are seeing now.


2. The Hubble telescope allows us to look back billions of years into the past

Originally posted by dreamofthedragon

NASA releases some incredible images of space, from time to time, and it’s made possible with The Hubble Telescope. Here’s an image which is a collection of 10,000 images captured by The Hubble. 


3. You can watch the Big Bang on your television

Cosmic background radiation is an after effect of the Big Bang, the event that allegedly gave birth to the universe. This can actually be seen on television where the old fuzzy noise we saw contains 1% of the same radiation. 


4. There’s a giant cloud of alcohol in Sagittarius B

Sagittarius B, is a huge cloud of vinyl alcohol whizzing in space near the Milky Way. It’s important as it leaves crucial information for scientists about how early life forms originated in space.


5. There’s a planet-sized diamond in Centaurus named after a Beatles song

Originally posted by iclalove

A planet , made completely of diamond, which has been called Lucy by scientists after the Beatles song, “Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds,”  can be found 50 light years away in Centaurus and weighs in a mind boggling 10 billion-trillion-trillion carats. 


6. It takes 225 million years for our Sun to travel around the galaxy

Originally posted by toomanythoughtanddreams

While our planets in the solar system circumnavigate the Sun, the star itself it on a orbit around the Milky Way. And if we’re counting in humans years, it takes 225 million years to complete the journey. 


7. Our solar system’s biggest mountain is on Mars

The tallest mountain in our solar system is Olympus Mons, located on Mars. It’s calculated  to be three times taller than Everest, spanning 600 kilometers across and 26 kilometers in height. 


8. Uranus spins on its side, with some rather strange results

Originally posted by spaceplasma

Uranus is not just unique because of its strange spinning, but the consequences of that effect results in 42 consecutive years of summer sunlight followed by another 42 consecutive winter darkness.


9. A year on Venus is shorter than its day

Originally posted by spaceplasma


Venus is the slowest rotating planet in our solar system - it takes longer to finish a rotation on its axis than orbit the entire Sun!


10. Neutron stars are the fastest spinning objects known in the universe

The fastest spinning known pulsar, a neutron star which emits a radiation beam as light, cycles on a whopping 70,000 km per hour speed.


11. A spoonful of a neutron star weighs about a billion ton

Neutron stars are unimaginably dense, in fact one spoonful of one such star would weigh around a billion tons!


12. The Voyager 1 spacecraft is the most distant human-made object from Earth

In 1977, the Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 were released into space as an ambitious project and are still cruising the outskirts of our galaxy and maybe beyond to help us explore space even further.


13. Voyager 1 captured the most distant photograph of Earth

The same spacecraft, Voyager 1, took the most distant photograph of Earth: Voyager 1 took a shot of the Earth from the far reaches of space in 1990, and the small speck at the end of the image that is the world we’re living on right now became known as the Pale Blue Dot. Astronomer Carl Sagan noted,“From this distant vantage point, the Earth might not seem of any particular interest. But for us, it’s different. Consider again that dot. That’s here. That’s home. That’s us.”


14. Scientists are looking for evidence of extraterrestrial life on Earth

Originally posted by ajshostak

One of the most exciting mysteries of the universe is a quest to find aliens, or as termed by scientists a project called The Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence (SETI), where they are pulling n all data about extraterrestrial life on other planets through evidence they have at their hands.


15. It is estimated there are 400 billion stars in our galaxy

Originally posted by thelucidnation

Our own Sun is one of 400 billion others, some astoundingly larger, some smaller, in the Milky Way alone. 


16. There could be 500 million planets capable of supporting life in our galaxy

“Goldilocks Planets” are  habitable planets which fall into a specific zone around the star to make life sustainable on it. Many factors come into play to get this perfect distance such as temperature, atmospheric content, water, chemical compounds on the surface etc. 


17. There are probably more than 170 billion galaxies in the observable universe

Based on extensive calculations, using data from the Hubble Telescope and as far as it can see into space, there’s a probable 170 billion galaxies besides our own Milky Way.


18. There could be an infinite number of universes

Originally posted by sci-universe

Speculative theories in advanced branches of science such as mathematics, quantum mechanics and astrophysics have summed up that we could be living in a “multiverse”- a convergence of an infinite number of universes. 


19. The human brain is the most complex object in the known universe

Originally posted by teapotsandroses

Our brain is a blueprint for the most complex network in the universe, with over a hundred billion neurons and quadrillion connections- this system isn’t even the tip of the iceberg which we know about what our brains have the potential to achieve.


20. We are all made of stardust

Originally posted by drugsruleeverythingaroundme

Carl Sagan beautifully summarises this fact, “The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies were made in the interiors of collapsing stars. We are made of starstuff.” In fact, every element on Earth transpired from a burning heart of a star.

I summarise heathers songs
  • Beautiful: School sucks unless your hot
  • Candy Store: Your not allowed to suck anymore
  • Fight for me: DAAMMNN you're hot
  • Freeze your brain: Take a fucking sip babes
  • Big Fun: underaged drinking! UNDERAGED DRINKING!
  • Dead girl walking: Sexy times
  • The me inside of me: Die in order to become even more popular
  • Blue: The fuck boi tune
  • Our love is god: I killed three people but I love you
  • My dead gay son: Dads out gay their sons
  • Seventeen: So sit in the naughty corner for murder
  • Shine a light: Your flaws are okay*
  • Lifeboat: My life's gone to shit now that all my rides to school have died
  • Shine a light reprise: *as long as they're socially acceptable
  • Kindergarten boyfriend: Still not over my ex, the song
  • Yo girl: Lol your life is shit
  • Meant to be yours: VERONICA openthe opentheDOOR plEAse
  • Dead girl walking: You thought you'd seen the last of me hah think again
  • I am damaged: You suck less than me so I'll die
  • Seventeen reprise: My boyfriend killed 4 people including himself but fuck that lets go watch the princess bride
A definitive timeline of Seventeen’s AL1 story

Don’t know why I’m starting this past 9pm when I have school tomorrow but due to an anxious bout (which has lasted for about two months) I’ve learnt that when inspiration hits, I just got to run with it, or should I say bat with it, amirite? (we’ll get to that later on)  LETS BEGIN.

Originally posted by yunchanpai

Firstly we have to understand the vague points of time the music videos have taken place in. At first I thought that from Adore U to Boom Boom, all of the comebacks were on an alternate timeline to don’t wanna cry, however seventeen has stated that we are in fact wrong and that this all in the same timeline.

Adore U’ (is a funky pop song-) shows a crush a boy has on someone, but is inexperienced and marks it down to adoration rather than affection, as to not confront their own feelings. In this we can see an innocent fear of not knowing what to really say to someone and knowing the right words to express what you’re feeling. ‘Mansae’ is a bit different, although the schoolboy concept would have fit the song adore u, the lyrics are a bit different. It’s almost as if the boy has accepted the crush as what it is , liking someone, however instead of confessing they act immature (like schoolboys) and are jealous instead. ‘Pretty U’ is a bit different and shows some development. It has a musical theatre style and shows some development, they’ve actually confessed their feelings. Here’s when things get a bit rocky. ‘Very Nice’ is probably one of the most impactful songs ‘I’ve heard from seventeen. Although the lyrics describe a first date, the music video is a bit different. Whenever one of the boys starts to feel something for the girl, their heart explodes. It’s almost as though they can’t actually handle it . This is later reinforced in ‘Boom Boom’ where they claim that everything is because of the love interest . Up until this point the songs seem pretty normal, light hearted and tells the story of someone’s first romance. Although it seems unrequited and unresponsive, the main character seems happy, even with the the one-sidedness of it all.

You see, this is what makes me suspicious. Back in their seventeen project days, they said quite a few times how they didn’t want to be regular idols and they wanted to be artists instead, ones who worked very closely with the production of the songs and choreography. This is what makes everything seem off to me. We’ll come back to this later on.

After Boom Boom is when I think things get really weird. At this point in time is where Seventeen as a group itself gains momentum and popularity, being put to such a high standard of even getting to be put in ‘EBS’ with Exo and Bts. This almost seems to pressure them even more. It was hard enough coming from a company which didn’t have a lot of money, but now that they were quite popular, it was even harder being able to maintain that. This is when I think chapter 0.5 happens, just before don’t wanna cry. As we’ve seen in the unit songs, this is a side of seventeen we’ve never seen before. 

Although change up is upbeat and catchy, the lyrics seem quite desperate. It’s almost as though the leaders are trying to prove themselves, saying that others wouldn’t understand what they had been doing and how had it is. Change up actually means a pitch in baseball, where the pitcher moves fast but the ball is significantly slower to confuse the batter.Furthermore, in ‘trauma’ the hip hop unit all speak about the mental blocks they’ve had, all one individual room only to realise they’re all facing it together. Lilli Yabbay could actually be symbolic of death as it’s used in funerals for many cultures. In the music video, we can see how the music had brought them to life, but as soon as it ended they were on the floor, much like everyone around.This could refer to people sleeping on the performance unit, or more logically, the fear of having people be dissatisfied or not being able to truly express what they want to say before their fans part with them. 

BEFORE EVERYONE LEAVES THIS POST BECAUSE THEY GET BORED, LEMME JUST SUMMARISE BEFORE THE VOCAL UNIT SONG DROPS.

I feel like this entire time we’ve though about this boy falls in love story as a basic romance and nothing more. The closer you look, maybe it could refer to their dream. Back when they looked adoringly at their favourite singers up on that stage. Back in their school days, holding a trainee title but no guarantees. Pretty U could be when they realised that they knew debut was the only option for them . Aju Nice is their debut, a point of excitement, we can see their change from mansae in the use of their female leads. Before they would get discouraged with the lack of response from the girl (which could be the lack of attention from the public) but when in very nice we can see how they continue to work for her attention and to see some emotion, running towards her at the end even after their metaphorical downfalls. Boom Boom is when they realise that hard work does pay off, but their B-side Fast Pace shows us how they miss the freedom they had before people really knew who they were.

Gonna continue this when I catch wind of the vocal unit. This took me an hour and 11 minutes, gosh I’m slow. Goodnight 

Part One | Part Two coming soon

― How to write an essay as an undergraduate history student

These are general guidelines to help undergraduate students write better essays. *Note that every assignment is different. You should take the time to closely read the instructions and meet with your Professor if necessary. I hope you will find these useful and good luck writing your papers!

B E F O R E   Y  O U   S T A R T

  • Make sure that you have closely read the instructions as presented by your Professor. There are many different types of historical essays (argumentative essays, historiographical reviews and so on). It is imperative that your style is adapted to the type of essay you are required to write.
  • Gather all your information. Some Professors want students to write essays using only class material, others expect them to do more research.  If the latter, make sure to gather all (most) of your information beforehand. If you are a university student, you  have access to a library and many academic journals. Use this access and make sure to ask librarians for help when needed.
  • Take careful notes as you are reading in preparation for your essay. If your Professor provided a specific question, make sure to read critically for information that is susceptible to help you answer this question. If your Professor has not assigned a question, you should still read carefully and try to find the different ways in which historians address certain issues. 
  • Some students prefer not to plan essays, others do. I suggest planning as it may be the best way to map out your ideas and begin forming an argument. It is impossible to cover all the facets of a problem in one essay, therefore, planning your essay may be the easiest way to make sure your work covers important aspects of a given issue. Planning will also help ensure that all your arguments remain connected and support a central claim.
  • Find a few (preferably history) essays that you find well-written and pay special attention to their structure. While you should be careful never to be so inspired as to be tempted to copy (this is a very serious academic offence) the goal of this exercise is to find more academic vocabulary and see how it is used by actual scholars. 

W H E N    W R I T I N G 

  • If your Professor gave you a question to answer in advance, make sure you answer this question and this question only. While you should always supply your arguments with pertinent examples, these should be succinct and focus on the main contention debated in your essay.
  • Make sure your essay has a thesis statement (yes, even when you are asked to answer a question). Your Professor should know from the very beginning of your essay what you will be arguing and what position you will take. All subsequent paragraphs until your conclusion should serve to better make the case for your thesis.
  • Try to follow the “classical” essay model, that is: introduction, body and conclusion. 
  • Began each paragraph with a topic sentence announcing the focus of the next few lines. Conclude the paragraph by rephrasing the main idea and possibly by trying to make a connection with the next body of text.
  • Always bring evidence to support your arguments. This evidence may come from the work of other historians are from a passage of a primary document. Whatever the case may be, make sure that your arguments are solidly built and “defended”.
  • Introductions and conclusions are (usually) not optional. Your introduction should help the reader understand what the text will argue and how it will proceed to do so, while your conclusion finishes the text by summarising key points and perhaps even making a suggestion for future studies. (An additional tip may be to write a simple introduction at the beginning and then rewriting it when the essay is finished. Once you are satisfied with your introduction, you may copy and paste it as your conclusion making necessary adjustments and avoiding copying the exact sentence structure. The point here is to use your introduction as a guide to write your conclusion.)
  • Be precise, you are writing a history paper, dates and names matter. 
  • Be clear and concise but make sure that all your points are well-developed. 

G E N E R A L   T I P S 

  • Locate your argument in historiography. As a historian in training, it is important that you show your Professor that you understand there are debates regarding specific interpretations. It is also important that you demonstrate that your line of argumentation is supported by the work of experienced researchers. Even if your essay primarily focuses on primary document analysis, surely some have analysed this text or object before, make sure to mention these scholars and their contributions to the debate.
  • Citations should be used wisely. As said before, it is important to ground your argument in the work of other historians. In this sense, citations are immensely useful. That being said, depending on the length of your paper, too many citations may suggest laziness as you have made little efforts paraphrasing. A few carefully selected and well-integrated quotes in your paper should do the trick.
  • Unless prohibited (for some odd reason) by your Professor, use footnotes to give additional information. Using footnotes to engage in discussions that are important but that otherwise cannot find their place in your text will show your Professor that you had a strong command of the topic at hand. It is also the best place to suggest further readings.
Japanese Phrases for Essays

初めに・はじめに  to begin with; first of all
まず   first of all; to start with
最初に・さいしょに  first
第一に・だいいちにfirst
劈頭第一・へきとうだいいち  first and foremost
次に・つぎに next
更に  furthermore
そして  and; thus
その上に・そのうえに  in addition; furthermore
他に・ほかに  in addition; besides
また  also
並びに・ならびに  both ~ and ~; ~ as well as ~
及び・および  and; as well as
それだけでなく  not only~ but also ~
のみならず   besides; as well as
しかも   moreover; furthermore; nevertheless; and yet
おそらく  probably
しかし   however
すでに   already
その結果・そのけっか  as a result
それにしては   considering that
それに対して・それにたいして  contrary to this
ため   in order to; because of
というのは   the reason why is
にしたがって   following; in accordance with
にとって   for; concerning
によって  due to; because of
一方で・いっぽうで  on the other hand
全く・まったく  really; truly; entirely
全て・すべて  overall; in general
多数の・たすうの  countless; majority
必ず・かならず  definitely
急速に・きゅうそくに  rapidly increasing
ますます  increasingly; more and more; decreasingly (when declining); less and less
次第に・しだいに  gradually; little by little
現在・げんざい  nowadays
確かに・たしかに  it is true that (but)
要すると・ようする  in short
非常に・  extremely
要するに・ようするに   in short
全く・またく  absolutely
絶対・ぜったい  absolutely
誠に・まことに  absolutely
〜によると  according to
〜によって  due to
従って・したがって  accordingly; therefore; consequently
事実上・じじつじょう  actually; as a matter of fact; in reality
だって  also
結局・けっきょく  after all
おしまい  in closing
終わりに・おわりに  to finish; to end; to close
やはり  after all
ようやく   finally
加えて・くわえる  in summary
それに加え・それにくわえ  to summarise
最後に・さいごに  in conclusion