that is the south carolina state house

anonymous asked:

*SLAMS TWO SHINY NICKELS DOWN* GIVE ME ALL YOU WANT TO TELL ABOUT MONROE PLS

FINALLY here are A FEW of my FAVORITE/MOST INTERESTING facts about my second favorite founding father! 

  • James Monroe is the youngest founding father, born in 1758 in Virginia. 
  • He had one sister and three brothers- one of whom (Spence) died when he was fifteen. Monroe was very close with his mother, who was also his teacher until he was eleven and at the age of sixteen his father died.
  • 1774 was also the year he started College of William and Mary and was a devoted student. He started with intentions of studying law- but dropped out months later to enlist in the 3rd Virginia Regiment in 1775. 
  • June 1775, Monroe, and other students joined twenty four older men in raiding the arsenal at the Governor’s Palace in Williamsburg. They used the loot of 200 muskets and 300 swords to arm the Williamsburg militia. 
  • During the Revolutionary War, he served under General George Washington, and was an aide de comp for General Stirling. 
  • In 1776, James Monroe was a hero at the Battle of Trenton. He was sent in an earlier boat across the Delaware River by General George Washington to scout. He nearly died at the battle, wounded at Trenton- he was shot in the left shoulder, he bled fast because the bullet severed an artery and he only survived because the volunteer medic stuck his finger in the bullet hole to stop the bleeding. He carried the shrapnel in his shoulder for the rest of his life. 
  • In John Trumbull’s painting The Capture of the Hessians at Trenton, December 26, 1776, Monroe can be seen lying wounded at left center of the painting. In the famous painting by Emanuel Leutze, Washington Crossing the Delaware, Monroe is depicted holding the American flag.
  • In 1777, after the Battle of Brandywine, George Washington sent for French speaking James Monroe to stay with Lafayette (who had been shot at the battle) throughout the night. According to Lafayette, James Monroe spent the entire night talking about how much he loved Thomas Jefferson. (Giles)
  • Monroe also wintered at Valley Forge, eventually reaching the rank of Colonel in the Virginia service. 
  • During the time that Monroe was stationed with Aaron Burr- Burr fell in love with Theodosia Prevost; and so did James Monroe. (Isenburg)
  • In 1780 the British invaded Richmond, and Governor Thomas Jefferson commissioned Monroe as a colonel to command the militia raised in response and act as liaison to the Continental Army in North Carolina.
  • Monroe did not return to William and Mary after the war, but finished his legal training with then Virginia Governor Thomas Jefferson who became one of his closest correspondents along with James Madison.
  • James Monroe and his wife, Elizabeth Monroe, had a particularly close relationship and married in 1786. Their warm family life is illustrated by his wife and two daughters, Eliza and Maria (they had a son but he died at sixteen months), who all accompanying Monroe on nearly all his official travel, including diplomatic assignments in France and Great Britain. 
  • During their time in France, the James and Elizabeth attended Napoleon I’s Coronation in Notre Dame Cathedral. Elizabeth was very strong and instrumental in fighting for the Lafayette’s rights and land as well as making sure while Marquis de Lafayette was in prison, his wife–Adrienne de Lafayette–wasn’t guillotined and got her freedom. 
  • The Monroes also provided support and shelter to the American citizen Thomas Paine in Paris, after he was arrested for his opposition to the execution of Louis XVI. 
  • Did you know that James Monroe once almost got into a duel with Alexander Hamilton? They both squared up in the home of Monroe’s family-in-law before Hamilton declared a duel to which Aaron Burr stopped from happening. 
  • Monroe moved to Albemarle County, Virginia to be near his friend and mentor, Thomas Jefferson. His farm Highland actually shared a border with Jefferson’s Monticello. With the addition of their colleague James Madison—whose home in Orange County, Virginia was situated on their way to and from Washington. Three presidents of the United States were neighbors. 
  • When Monroe was Governor of Virginia in 1800, hundreds of slaves from Virginia planned to kidnap him, take Richmond, and negotiate for their freedom. Due to a storm on August 30, they were unable to attack. Monroe influenced the Executive Council to pardon and sell some slaves instead of hanging them.
  • 1803, Thomas Jefferson sent him to France to assist Robert Livingston with the negotiation of New Orleans. Finding Napoleon strapped for cash and willing to sell the entirety of the Louisiana Territory, Monroe took advantage of a deal that would double the size of the nation.
  • As Envoy to Spain, Monroe took a journey by mule from Paris to Madrid to negotiate with Spain for the Floridas. 
  • During James Madison’s presidency, James Monroe held TWO cabinet positions at once–Secretary of War and Secretary of State. He was the only person in America’s history to of held TWO cabinet positions at the same time. 
  • Monroe’s first presidential term was coined the Era of Good Feelings.
  • His inauguration was the first ever to of been done outside. 
  • His daughter–Maria–was also the first to be married at the white house!
  • James Monroe was the first president to travel by steamboat. Towns across the country greeted him with parades, lavish dinners, and other grand events. The city of Charleston, South Carolina actually barbecued an ox in honor of his visit.
  • 1820, Monroe saw no opposing candidates, and he was re-elected with all but one electoral votes. The one electoral vote against him was the result of a man who wanted George Washington to be the only president elected unanimously. This was the last time the United States saw a candidate run without serious opposition- Monroe was the only president besides Washington to do so.
  • James Monroe has a song about him written at the time of his presidential campaign called “Monroe is the man”. 
  • One time, William Crawford (secretary of treasury) called on Monroe at the White House to suggest a list of appointments he wished the President to approve. However, Monroe objected to Crawford’s list and said that he intended to make his own. Crawford lost his cool and snapped at the President, “Well, if you will not appoint persons well-qualified for the places, tell me whom you will appoint that I may get rid of their opportunities!”. The President was not intimidated by Crawford, telling his Treasury Secretary, “Sir, that is none of your damn business.“ Crawford was not easily intimidated, either (he killed a man in a duel years earlier). Monroe’s remark led Crawford to charge at the 67 year old President with his cane, waving it at Monroe while calling him a “damned infernal old scoundrel.”  Monroe was quick to grab two red hot tongs from a nearby fireplace for self-defense and threatened to personally throw Crawford out of the White House. 
  • Monrovia, Liberia is the only foreign capital in the world named after a United States president. 
  • Monroe was recognizably old-fashioned in choosing his attire. He was the last president to dress in the style of the Revolutionary War era (which was considered outdated) and was called nickname “The Last Cocked Hat.”
  • WHILE LIVING IN THE WHITE HOUSE- JAMES MONROE HAD A PET SPANIEL.
  • James Monroe was sent a drawing of a penis while he was president with a goofy note. 
  • Because the white house burned down in the War of 1812 and the white house fund was broke- James Monroe had to dip into his own pocket to fix the white house and provide dinners for his guests. His wife Elizabeth chose all of the inside decor and furniture! By the time he finished his presidencies, he had lost his Virginia estate and was $75,000 in debt partly due to his wife’s poor health who likely had epilepsy and severe burns from when she collapsed near a fire. 
  • James Monroe burned his correspondence with his wife after she died. He also burned many of his papers/letters in an attempt to keep a private life. When Elizabeth died, he predicted he would not live any longer. Elizabeth had been his political adviser and James frequently sought her advise.  
  • Shortly before his death, James Madison and James Monroe (best friends and rivals) sent each other a heart felt letter. Monroe felt that he was fading and sent Madison a letter detailing how much he thought of him, and appreciated him, loved him through the years and how depressed he was that he would never see Madison ever again. Madison, getting emotional (who knew) sent him a letter back, scolding him that he shouldn’t be so negative because Monroe was going to get better and they were going to be able to hold one another again. Monroe never did get better. 
  • Like John Adams and Thomas Jefferson before him, James Monroe died on July 4th on the 55th anniversary of the Declaration of Independence. 
  • Monroe’s last words were, “I only regret that I should leave this world without again beholding him.” you wondering how this “him” was? IT WAS FUCKING JAMES MADISON. HE WAS TALKING ABOUT JAMES MADISON WHEN HE DIED. 
  • After his death, family were careful to place James in perfect alignment next to his wife. 
We have general elections every year in the US. VOTE THIS YEAR.

Among other things it’s doing, the federal government is looking to devolve more power back to the states.  VOTE THIS YEAR, and help to swing your state’s government.   Off-year elections have the smallest turnouts and so they are EASY TO SWAY by getting out there to vote.

VOTE THIS YEAR. Off-year elections can affect Congress and they affect local and regional offices whose policies can hold people accountable in their bases of operations if the federal government refuses to. For 2017 we have:

  • 1 US Senate seat (Alabama)
  • 6 US House of Representatives (California 34th District, Georgia 6th District, Kansas 4th District, Montana At-Large District, South Carolina 5th District, Utah 3rd District)
  • 2 State Governors (New Jersey, Virginia)
  • New Jersey General Assembly and Senate, Virginia House, North Carolina General Assembly (a special re-vote with the de-gerrymandered district lines!)
  • Lots of mayoral and local elections that will MATTER IN COMING YEARS because city mayors can carry a lot of influence in elections and also act as leaders and innovators to model policies and programs (see: sanctuary cities)

List of places Dylann Roof visited:

- Boone Hall Plantation, near Charleston, SC

- Avenue of Oaks

- Sullivan’s Island, SC

- Fort Moultrie, Sullivan’s Island, SC

- Magnolia Plantation and Gardens

- Audubon Swamp Garden

- Kensington Mansion, Eastover, SC

- James Island, SC

- Elmwood Cemetery, Columbia, SC

- AMC Dutch Square 14 movie theater, Columbia, SC

- Finlay Park, Columbia, SC

- Trinity Episcopal Cathedral, Columbia, SC

- Angel Oak, Angel Oak Park, Johns Island, SC

- McLeod Plantation, James Island, SC

- Museum and Library of Confederate History, Greenville, SC

- Falls Park, Greenville, SC

- Medusa Tree, Falls Park, Greenville, SC

- Friendfield Plantation, near Georgetown, SC

- Edmondston-Alston House, Charleston, SC

- Old Exchange & Provost Dungeon, Charleston, SC

- South Carolina State House, Columbia, SC

- Congaree National Park, SC

- Weston Lake at Congaree National Park, SC

Charleston - South Carolina, USA

Traditional Charleston homes and buildings typically have decks or balconies facing south or west, to ensure the house receives ample breeze. This design feature is a testament to how high the temperature can get in Charleston. 

Charleston was the first American city to open a public college, open a museum, and open a theatre. The city was also the used as the filming location for many scenes in the hit movie The Notebook. Special The Notebook tours are run for fans of the film. 

America when raising all the states:

“Florida get the gators out of the​ pool!”

“Kansas be a little more exciting! You are supposed to be like meeee”

“Oh my God Missouri stop messing around with the Exorcist house dammit.”

* Texas building big ass bridges *
“stOP. SomeONe Is going to fall off of it and by someone I mean Louisiana.”

*South Carolina slowly making themselves bigger with trash and extending into the ocean*
“Y O U. C A N T. L E A V E”

I mean at this point even England feels some pitty for him

Writing Research: American Revolution

The American Revolution was a political upheaval that took place between 1765 and 1783 during which colonists in the Thirteen American Colonies rejected the British monarchy and aristocracy, overthrew the authority of Great Britain, and founded the United States of America.

Starting in 1765, members of American colonial society rejected the authority of the British Parliament to tax them without any representatives in the government, and resisted renewed British attempts to collect duties on goods such as sugar and molasses that for many years had gone uncollected through widespread smuggling by colonists. During the following decade, protests by colonists—known as Patriots—continued to escalate, as in the Boston Tea Party in 1773 during which patriots destroyed a consignment of taxed tea from the East India Company. The British responded by imposing punitive laws—the Coercive Acts—on Massachusetts in 1774 until the tea had been paid for, following which Patriots in the other colonies rallied behind Massachusetts. In late 1774 the Patriots set up their own alternative government to better coordinate their resistance efforts against Britain, while other colonists, known as Loyalists, preferred to remain subjects of the British Crown.

Tensions escalated to the outbreak of fighting between Patriot militia and British regulars at Lexington and Concord in April 1775, after which the Patriot Suffolk Resolves effectively replaced the Royal government of Massachusetts, and confined the British to control of the city of Boston. The conflict then evolved into a global war, during which the Patriots (and later their French, Spanish and Dutch allies) fought the British and Loyalists in what became known as the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783). Patriots in each of the thirteen colonies formed a Provincial Congress that assumed power from the old colonial governments and suppressed Loyalism. Claiming King George III’s rule to be tyrannical and infringing the colonists’ “rights as Englishmen”, the Continental Congress declared the colonies free and independent states in July 1776. The Patriot leadership professed the political philosophies of liberalism and republicanism to reject monarchy and aristocracy, and proclaimed that all men are created equal. Congress rejected British proposals requiring allegiance to the monarchy and abandonment of independence. [1]

Names

  • ModernMom - Popular Baby Names in the 1700s
  • British Baby Names - Curiosities of the Seventeenth Century
  • Medieval Naming Guides - Early 17th Century English Names
  • Internet Archive - Early census making in Massachusetts, 1643-1765, with a reproduction of the lost census of 1765 (recently found) and documents relating thereto;
  • Olive Tree Genealogy - Irish Passenger Lists: 1765, no ship name, arriving from Ireland in Boston, Massachusetts
  • Trail Of Our Ancestors - Names of German Pioneers to Pennsylvania: 
    Passenger Ships’ Lists, 1750
  • USGenWeb Archives -  Names of Pioneers from the Palatinate Germany to Pennsylvania, 1754
  • RootsWeb’s Guide - Given Names in Early America
  • GIGA - Name Chronological List, 1760 - 1779

Society & Life

  • History.com - The American Revolution Begins: April 19, 1775
  • History.com - American Revolution
  • History Channel - American Revolution History (Video)
  • PBS - Liberty! The American Revolution
  • PBS - Africans in American: The Revolutionary War, Part 2
  • The History Place - American Revolution
  • The History Place - Prelude to Revolution, 1763 to 1775
  • The History Place - The American War for Independence: 1775 to 1776 Conflict and Revolution
  • University of Houston - Overview of the American Revolution
  • Library of Congress - The American Revolution
  • Encyclopaedia Britannica - American Revolution
  • U.S. National Park Service - The American Revolution
  • Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History - The American Revolution, 1763-1783
  • America’s Library - Revolutionary Period, 1764-1789
  • Coastal Heritage Society - American Revolution
  • About.com - American Revolution
  • United States Department of State - 1776-1783: American Revolution Timeline
  • United States Military Academy - American Revolution
  • British Library - The American Revolution from 1763 - 1787
  • National Endowment for the Humanities - Voices of the American Revolution
  • University of Groningen - Was the American Revolution a Revolution?
  • Independence Hall Association - Revolutionary War Timeline
  • North Carolina Encyclopedia - Reasons behind the Revolutionary War
  • Social Studies For Kids - Causes of the Revolutionary War
  • Mount Vernon -  Ten Facts about Washington and the Revolutionary War
  • Cracked - 5 Myths About the Revolutionary War Everyone Believes
  • Journal of the American Revolution - 7 Myths about the Boston Tea Party
  • University of Notre Dame - Revisiting America’s Revolutionary Myths and Realities
  • History Net - Debunking Boston Tea Party Myths
  • Smithsonian - Myths of the American Revolution
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill - The Colored Patriots of the American Revolution
  • The Washington Post - The American Revolution Was Not A Whites-only War
  • University of Houston - Slavery, the American Revolution, and the Constitution
  • Colonial Williamsburg -  African Americans During The American Revolution: Teacher Reference Sheet (PDF)
  • Rutgers University - African Americans in the Revolution
  • Ducksters - American Revolution: African Americans
  • North Carolina Encyclopedia - African Americans and the Revolution
  • University of California, Irvine - African American Soldiers and the American Revolution
  • Colorado College - Blacks and the American Revolution
  • History Net - Black History
  • Wikipedia - African Americans in the Revolutionary War
  • National Endowment for the Humanities - The Native Americans’ Role in the American Revolution: Choosing Sides
  • Independence Hall Association -  Revolutionary Limits: Native Americans
  • History Wiz -  Native Americans and the American Revolution
  • ABC-CLIO - American Revolution, Native American Participation
  • University of Houston - Native Americans and the American Revolution
  • Prezi - Contributions of African Americans, Native Americans and Women during the American Revolution (Video)
  • PBS - Liberty! The American Revolution: Daily Life in the Colonies
  • Ducksters - Daily Life During the Revolution War
  • Independence Hall Association - The Revolution on the Home Front
  • Library of Congress - Revolutionary War: The Home Front
  • American History - Colonial Daily Life During the American Revolution
  • New York University Libraries - The American Revolution: An Everyday Life Perspective
  • ABC‑CLIO - Daily Life During the American Revolution
  • ABBE Regional Library System - The Lives of Children During The Revolutionary War (PDF)
  • Wikipedia - Children of the American Revolution
  • U.S. National Park Service - Children’s Rights and the American Revolution
  • Teachinghistory.org - Colonial Teenagers
  • The Santa Fe New Mexican Newspaper -  Fighting Spirit: Teenagers in the American Revolution
  • Google Books - The Brave Women and Children of the American Revolution
  • U.S. National Park Service -  Patriot Families’ Role in Effecting American Independence and the American Revolution’s Effect on their Family Life (PDF)
  • U.S. National Park Service -  Life during the Colonial Period and the American Revolution
  • Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History - Assessing Change: Women’s Lives in the American Revolutionary Era
  • Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History - Lucy Knox on the home front during the Revolutionary War, 1777
  • American Revolution - Women in the Revolution
  • Wikipedia - Women in the American Revolution
  • Journal of the American Revolution - 10 Amazing Women of the Revolutionary War
  • History of Massachusetts - The Roles of Women in the American Revolutionary War
  • Women History Blog - Women’s Role in the American Revolution
  • Social Studies - Roles of Women in the American Revolution and the Civil War
  • Independence Hall Association - Revolutionary Changes and Limitations: Women
  • Annenberg Media - Women of the American Revolution (PDF)
  • About.com - Women and the American Revolution
  • The Examiner - The Role of Women in the American Revolution
  • Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media - Women and the Revolution
  • Prezi - Women’s Roles During the American Revolution Outlined by Hannah Schierl (Video)
  • United States Army - Women in the Army
  • Atlanta Blackstar - 5 Extraordinary Black Women Who Played Major Roles In The American Revolution
  • Women History Blog - Women’s Rights After the American Revolution
  • Journal of the American Revolution - Top 10 Marriages Gone Bad
  • National Women’s History Museum - American Revolution
  • American In Class - Civilians in the American Revolution
  • National Humanities Center - Religion and the American Revolution
  • New York University Libraries -  The American Revolution: Religion
  • Library of Congress - Religion and the American Revolution
  • U.S. National Park Service - Religion and the American Revolution
  • Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History - Religion and the American Revolution
  • Social Studies For Kids - Religion and the Church in the 13 American Colonies
  • Social Studies For Kids - Education in the 13 American Colonies
  • New York University Libraries - The American Revolution: Education
  • Oregon State University - Education in the Revolutionary Era
  • Prezi - Education During the Revolution Period (Video)
  • Wikipedia - Education in the Thirteen Colonies
  • Chesapeake College - Early National Education
  • Mackinac Center for Public Policy - Early Colonial Period to the American Revolution
  • Noah Webster House - Life in 1770s Connecticut
  • Rutgers University - The American Revolution in New Jersey 
  • Wikipedia - New Jersey in the American Revolution
  • Wikipedia - South Carolina in the American Revolution
  • Wikipedia - Pennsylvania in the American Revolution
  • Wikipedia - Virginia in the American Revolution
  • Wikipedia - Maryland in the American Revolution
  • Wikipedia - Georgia in the American Revolution
  • Wikipedia - Massachusetts in the American Revolution
  • United States History - Massachusetts and the American Revolution
  • Wikipedia - Connecticut in the American Revolution
  • Connecticut History - Revolutionary War, 1775-1783
  • United States History - Delaware and the American Revolution
  • Wikipedia - New Hampshire in the American Revolution
  • United States History - New Hampshire and the American Revolution
  • Wikipedia - North Carolina in the American Revolution
  • United States History - North Carolina and the American Revolution
  • Wikipedia - Rhode Island in the American Revolution
  • United States History - Rhode Island and the American Revolution
  • Internet Archive - New York City during the American Revolution
  • Early America - New York City During the First Year of the Revolution
  • AM New York Newspaper - NYC Has A Lot More Revolutionary War History Than You Might Think
  • Wikipedia - Germans in the American Revolution
  • McGill University - Why Canada Did Not Join the American Revolution
  • Canadian War Museum - The American Revolution, 1775-1783
  • History Net - Invasion of Canada During the American Revolutionary War
  • Biography - Famous People in the American Revolution
  • Wikipedia - George Washington in the American Revolution
  • Ducksters - American Revolution: Life as a Revolutionary War Soldier
  • Independence Hall Association - The War Experience: Soldiers, Officers, and Civilians
  • The Countryman Press - Soldier of the American Revolution
  • PBS - Liberty! American Revolution: Military Perspectives
  • Prezi - Daily Life of an American Soldier During The Revolutionary War (Video)
  • Independence Hall Association - American Revolution: Selections from the Diary of Private Joseph Plumb Martin
  • JSTOR Database - Journal of a British Officer During the American Revolution 
  • U.S. National Park Service - Privateers in the American Revolution
  • Reddit: Ask Historians - What did the people of Great Britain think of men like George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, and Thomas Jefferson during the American Revolution?
  • Reddit: Ask Historians - What was popular British opinion of the American Revolution?
  • Reddit: Ask - British Redditors, how were you taught the American Revolution?
  • Study - British Loyalists vs. American Patriots During the American Revolution (Video)
  • Ducksters - American Revolution: Patriots and Loyalists
  • Independence Hall Association - Loyalists, Fence-sitters, and Patriots
  • Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History -  A patriot’s letter to his loyalist father, 1778
  • Wikipedia - American Revolution: Patriot
  • Wikipedia - Patriots in the American Revolution
  • Independence Hall Association - The Boston Patriots
  • Wikipedia - American Revolution: Loyalist
  • United States History - The Loyalists
  • Wikipedia - Loyalists in the American Revolution
  • University of Groningen - Loyalists During the American Revolution
  • Women History Blog - Loyalist Women of the American Revolution
  • PBS - After the Revolution: A Midwife’s Tale
  • Journal of the American Revolution - Top 10 Facts About British Soldiers
  • History.com - Tea Act: American Revolution
  • National Endowment for the Humanities - After the American Revolution: Free African Americans in the North
  • West Virginia Division Culture and History - Revolutionary War and Its Aftermath
  • North Carolina Encyclopedia - American Revolution- Part 6: A Troubled Aftermath
  • Brown University - The American Revolution and its Aftermath
  • About.com - The Effects of the American Revolutionary War on Britain
  • Prezi - The American Revolution and its Aftermath (Video)
  • NPR (National Public Radio) - What Happened To British Loyalists After The Revolutionary War?
  • The Atlantic - What If America Had Lost the Revolutionary War?
  • Teachinghistory.org - What If…? Reexamining the American Revolution
  • The Huffington Post - What If We’d Lost the American Revolution?
  • How Stuff Works - What if America had lost the Revolution?

Commerce

  • JSTOR Database - Prices and Inflation During the American Revolution, Pennsylvania, 1770-1790
  • The Food Timeline -  Colonial America & Fare
  • Wikipedia - Financial Costs of the American Revolutionary War
  • British Library - The American Revolution: The Costs of Empire - The Seven Years’ War and the Stamp Act Crisis
  • Smithsonian Center for Education and Museum Studies - Revolutionary Money
  • Independence Hall Association - Following the Money
  • Ludwig von Mises Institute - Inflation and the American Revolution

Entertainment & Food

  • Massachusetts Historical Society - Newspapers from 1765 
  • Mount Vernon - Reporting the Revolutionary War
  • Journal of the American Revolution - Top 10 Revolutionary War Newspapers
  • Assumption College - Newspapers in Revolutionary Era America & The Problems of Patriot and Loyalist Printers
  • Wikipedia - American Literature: Revolutionary Period
  • The Examiner - Literature of the American Revolution
  • New York University Libraries - The American Revolution: Music
  • University of Houston - Music and the American Revolution
  • PBS - Liberty! American Revolution - Revolutionary War Music
  • Independence Hall Association - Songs of the Revolution
  • Wikipedia - Songs of the American Revolutionary War
  • Smithsonian Folkways - American Revolutionary War Songs to Cultivate the Sensations of Freedom
  • Smithsonian - The Food the Fueled the American Revolution
  • National Museum of American History - What did soldiers eat during the Revolutionary War?
  • Wikipedia - Cuisine of the Thirteen Colonies
  • American Revolution for Kids - Revolutionary Recipes
  • Colonial Williamsburg - Colonial Foodways
  • Independence Hall Association - Firecake Recipe
  • Colonial Williamsburg - Drinking in Colonial America
  • Serious Eats - 5 Colonial-Era Drinks You Should Know
  • Colonial Williamsburg - Dessert: A Look into the World of the 18th-century Confectioner!
  • Social Studies For Kids - Food in the 13 American Colonies
  • Wikipedia - 1760 in Poetry
  • Wikipedia - 1765 in Poetry
  • Prezi - Leisure Activities and Sports During the American Revolution (Video)
  • Journal of Sport History - Sports and Games of the American Revolution (PDF)
  • National Museum of American History - What did Revolutionary War soldiers have in their pockets?
  • Journal of the American Revolution - The Role of Dancing
  • Encyclopedia Virginia - Dance During the Colonial Period

Hygiene, Health & Medicine

  • New York University Libraries - Health and Medicine in Revolutionary America
  • United States Department of the Air Force - Military Medicine During the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries
  • Tredyffrin Easttown Historical Society - Medicine in the Revolutionary War
  • Prezi - Health and Dental Care During the American Revolution (Video)
  • The Dallas Morning News -  Medical Care in the American Revolution
  • PBS - Liberty! American Revolution - Medicine
  • Office of Medical History - Medical Men in the American Revolution
  • National Center for Biotechnology Information - Medical Men in the American Revolution 1775-1783
  • JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association - Naval and Maritime Medicine During the American Revolution
  • MedPage Today - George Washington, Smallpox, and the American Revolution
  • National Center for Biotechnology Information -  Drug Therapy in Colonial and Revolutionary America
  • Minnesota Wellness Publications -  The Revolutionary War: The History of Medicine
  • American Revolution - George Washington: A Dental Victim
  • Mount Vernon - The Trouble with Teeth
  • Project Gutenberg - Drug Supplies in the American Revolution
  • Colonial Williamsburg - To Bathe or Not to Bathe: Coming Clean in Colonial America
  • Revolutionary War Museum - Medicine and Hygiene
  • Independence Hall Association - Surgeons and Butchers
  • eHow - About Hygiene in Colonial Times
  • Legacy - Life and Death in The Liberty Era 1750-1800
  • National Center for Biotechnology Information - Revolutionary Fever: Disease and War in the Lower South, 1776–1783
  • Wikipedia - Disease in Colonial America
  • Army Heritage Center - A Deadly Scourge: Smallpox During the Revolutionary War
  • PBS - The 9 Deadly Diseases That Plagued George Washington
  • Mental Floss - Biological Warfare in the American Revolution?
  • Prezi -  Health Care And Hospitals During The American Revolution (Video)
  • Wikipedia - Physicians in the American Revolution
  • Journal of the American Revolution - Surgery
  • Campbell University - The Colonial Family In America
  • Jamestown-Yorktown Foundation - Colonial Medicine (PDF)
  • WebMD - Warm Up to Ginger
  • Colonial Williamsburg - Apothecary
  • Colonial Williamsburg - Th Art and Mystery of Apothecary
  • ehow - What Tools Did Apothecary Use in Colonial Times?
  • Williamsburg Tours - 18th Century Medical Practices in Colonial Williamsburg, VA.
  • ehow - How Did Colonial Doctors Work?
  • Colonial Williamsburg - Eighteenth-Century Medical Myths

Fashion

  • North Carolina Encyclopedia - Outfitting an American Revolutionary Soldier 
  • Colonial Williamsburg - Introduction to Eighteenth-Century Clothing
  • American Revolution - Clothing 1770 - 1800
  • History of American Wars - Revolutionary War Uniforms
  • Ducksters - American Revolution: Soldiers Uniforms and Gear
  • American Revolution - The Revolution And The New Republic, 1775-1800: Colonial Clothing
  • Massachusetts Department of Higher Education - Men’s Clothing from the 1770s
  • Massachusetts Department of Higher Education - Women’s Clothing from the 1770s
  • Massachusetts Department of Higher Education - Girl’s Clothing from the 1770s
  • ehow - Makeup & Hairsyles of the 1700s
  • Colonial Williamsburg - Stuff and Nonsense: Myths That Should by Now Be History
  • Wikipedia - 1775-95 in Western Fashion

Dialogue

  • Ducksters - American Revolution: Glossary and Terms
  • Colonial Quills - The Art of the Olde-Fashioned Insults
  • History of Redding - Exploring Period Vocabulary & Slang
  • Jamestown-Yorktown Foundation - Military Slang of the Revolutionary War Era
  • Colonial Williamsburg - Puttin’ on the Dog: Adventures in the Idioms of Our Mother Tongue
  • Shmoop - The American Revolution Terms
  • HyperVocal - 38 Vulgar Terms From the 19th-Century Urban Dictionary

Justice & Crime

  • Wikipedia - Prisoners of War in the American Revolutionary War
  • Mount Vernon - Prisoners of War
  • Wikipedia - Militia Generals in the American Revolution
  • Colonial Williamsburg - Colonial Crimes and Punishments
  • History.com - Redcoats kill sleeping Americans in Paoli Massacre: September 20, 1777
  • H‑Net: Humanities and Social Sciences Online - The Fate of Britain’s Convicts after the American Revolution
  • Early American Crime -  An Exploration of Crime, Criminals, And Punishments From America’s Past
  • Colonial Williamsburg - Cruel and Unusual: Prisons and Prison Reform
  • Slate - Did the Brits Burn Churches?
  • Encyclopedia Virginia - Convict Labor During the Colonial Period
  • Wikipedia - Laws Leading to the American Revolution
  • Sam Houston State University - Military Punishments in the Continental Army
  • History.com - Pennsylvania militiamen senselessly murder Patriot allies: March 8, 1782
  • Mount Vernon - American Spies of the Revolution
  • Wikipedia - Boston Massacre
  • National Archives and Records Administration -  The Declaration of Independence: A Transcription
  • Wikipedia - United States Declaration of Independence
  • Independence Hall Association - Declaration of Independence
  • University of Groningen -  The Final Text of the Declaration of Independence July 4 1776
  • Library of Congress - Declaration of Independence
  • History.com -  Declaration of Independence: American Revolution
  • Independence Hall Association - When Does the Revolution End?
  • Study - Effects of the American Revolution: Lesson & Quiz
  • Net Industries - The Early Years of American Law - Colonial Freedom, Britain’s Push For Greater Control, A New Start, A New Criminal Court System
  • Journal of the American Revolution - 10 Facts About Prisoners of War

anonymous asked:

Hey! I was wondering if you had any interesting facts about Andrew Jackson? I do love to read about history and it's been bothering me for quite a while that I don't know as much about Jackson as I wish I did.

  • When Andrew Jackson was in school, he invited a bunch of prostitutes to the annual Christmas Ball, just because he knew how much it would freak out all of the “proper” attendees. He also liked to move outhouses around so when people went out to use their bathroom, the bathroom was no longer there.
  • He was the first president to of been born “dirt poor” and was born in a log cabin. 
  • Jackson was the first president to have an assassination attempt. Leaving the U.S. Capitol on January 30, 1835, Richard Lawrence fired a pistol at the president from just feet away. When Lawrence’s gun misfired, he pulled out a second weapon. That pistol also misfired. Jackson charged Lawrence with his cane and went forward and beat him almost to death. 
  • Jackson is on the $20 bill, yet he hated paper money. 
  • In 1780, at the age of 13, Jackson joined the local militia during the American Revolutionary War. Along with his brother Robert, he was taken prisoner by the British and nearly starved to death. In captivity, he once refused to clean the boots of a British officer, who attacked him with a sword leaving scars on Jackson’s left hand and head. Although Jackson was released in 1781, he lost his mother and two brothers during the conflict. Due to these incidents, Jackson deeply resented the British.
  • Although he was a strict officer, Jackson was popular among his troops. They said he was as “tough as old hickory” and hence he was nicknamed “Old Hickory”. Jackson is also known to carry a cane made of hickory with which he used to beat people.
  • Andrew Jackson was involved in more than a dozen duels in his life. The most famous one is his duel with Charles Dickinson. Charles published an attack against Andrew in a local newspaper and Andrew responded by challenging Charles for a duel. Dickinson was an expert shot. Jackson shot Dickinson and killed him. However, the bullet that hit Jackson was so close to his heart that it could never be safely removed. In fact, for a number of years Jackson carried two bullets in his body.
  • The 1828 election turned dirty with Jackson’s wife accused of adultery and bigamy due to a prior incident. Jackson was referred by his opponents as “Jackass” during the elections. Jackson said he liked the term and used it as a symbol of the Democrats. Jackson won the election.
  • Jackson taught his parrot how to curse to the extent that the parrot had to be removed from the president’s funeral because it was cursing too much. 
  • Because the border between North and South Carolina was not yet firmly established at the time of his birth, it is unclear exactly which state he was born in.
  • Jackson’s wife Rachel died two weeks after his election to the presidency in 1828.  As a result, his wife’s niece served throughout Jackson’s term as hostess of the White House.
States voted most likely to..

Alabama-Jump off a moving vehicle

Arkansas-scream at a pig for no reason

Delaware-boast about being ‘first’

Florida-lay in the sun for a day, getting the worst sun burn of 2017

Georgia-eat 20 peaches in a single sitting

Kentucky-smoke enough cigarettes in a day to kill a human

Louisiana- complete a voodoo ritual

Maryland-lose $20000 and say it’s ‘nothing’

Mississippi-misspell their own name

Missouri-get lost in a cave system. Seriously?

North Caroline-run somebody over, then reverse back over them

South Caroline-say they will 'secede’ if they don’t get their way

Tennessee-try and sing a song combining pop, rock and country into one mashup.

Texas-fall asleep on a horse.

Virginia-fight Massachusetts on who had the first thanksgiving

West Virginia-move house if they see a spider

50 States Most Haunted

Each state in the USA has it’s own tales of haunted hotels, houses, and various other places. But each state has what is considered their “most haunted” spot. What is your state’s most haunted place?

1. Alabama - Sloss Furnaces (Birmingham)
2. Alaska - UAA’s Wendy Williamson Auditorium (Anchorage)
3. Arizona - Bird Cage Theater (Tombstone)
4. Arkansas - The Crescent Hotel (Eureka Springs)
5. California - Alcatraz Island (San Francisco)
6. Colorado - The Stanley Hotel (Estes Park)
7. Connecticut - Seaside Sanatorium (Waterford)
8. Delaware - Fort Delaware (Pea Patch Island)
9. Florida - Florida Theatre (Jacksonville)
10. Georgia - Kennesaw House (Marietta)
11. Hawaii - ‘lolani Place (Honolulu)
12. Idaho - Old Idaho State Penitentiary (Boise)
13.  Illinois - Congress Plaza Hotel (Chicago)
14. Indiana - French Lick Springs Hotel (French Lick)
15. Iowa - Villisca Ax Murder House (Villisca)
16. Kansas - The Sallie House (Atchison)
17. Kentucky - Waverly Hills Sanatorium (Louisville)
18. Louisiana - The Myrtles Plantation (St. Francisville)
19. Maine - Wood Island Lighthouse (Wood Island)
20. Maryland - Antietam Battlefield (Sharpsburg)
21. Massachusetts - The Lizzie Borden House (Fall River)
22. Michigan - Henderson Castle (Kalamazoo)
23. Minnesota - Forepaugh’s Restaurant (St. Paul)
24. Mississippi - Cedar Grove Mansion (Vicksburg)
25. Missouri - Lemp Mansion (St. Louis)
26. Montana - The University of Montana (Missoula)
27. Nebraska - Nebraska State Capitol (Lincoln)
28. Nevada - Virginia City
29. New Hampshire - Pine Hill Cemetery (Hollis)
30. New Jersey - Seabrook-Wilson House (Port Monmouth)
31. New Mexico - Highway 666
32. New York - The Amityville Horror House (Amityville)
33. North Carolina - Brown Mountain Lights (Burke and Caldwell Counties)
34. North Dakota - Liberty Memorial Building (Bismarck)
35. Ohio - The Ridges (Athens)
36. Oklahoma - Skirvin Hotel (Oklahoma City)
37. Oregon - McMenamin’s White Eagle Saloon (Portland)
38. Pennsylvania - Gettysburg Battlefields (Gettysburg)
39. Rhode Island - The Ladd School (Exeter)
40. South Carolina - Old Charleston Jail (Charleston)
41. South Dakota - Bullock Hotel (Deadwood)
42. Tennessee - Loretta Lynn Plantation House (Hurricane Mills)
43. Texas - The Alamo (San Antonio)
44. Utah - Westminster College (Salt Lake City)
45. Vermont - The University of Vermont (Burlington)
46. Virginia - Ferry Plantation House (Virginia Beach)
47. Washington - The Palace Hotel (Port Townshend)
48. West Virginia - West Virginia State Penitentiary (Moundsville)
49. Wisconsin - Summerwind Mansion (West Bay Lake)
50. Wyoming - Wyoming Frontier Prison (Rawlins)

Today in Black History for February 8th
  1. 1990 - Andey Rooney suspended for racist comments 
    Andy Rooney, a CBS “60 Minutes” commentator, received a 90-day suspension from work because of racist remarks about African Americans attributed to him by Chris Bull, a New York-based reporter for “The Advocate,” a bi-weekly national gay & lesbian news magazine published in Los Angeles. Bull quoted Rooney as having said during an interview: “I’ve believed all along that most people are born with equal intelligence, but Blacks have watered down their genes because the less intelligent ones are the ones that have the children. They drop out of school early, do drugs, and get pregnant.”

  2. 1986 - Figure Skater Debi Thomas wins Woman’s Singles
    Figure skater Debi Thomas became the first African American to win the Women’s Singles of the U.S. National Figure Skating Championship competition, was a pre-med student at Stanford University.

  3. 1986 - Ophrah’s On!
    Oprah Winfrey becomes the first African American woman to host a nationally syndicated talk show.

  4. 1985 - Reporter at Large
    Brenda Renee Pearson an official court reporter for the House of Representatives was the first black female to record the State of the Union message delivered by the president in the House chambers.

  5. 1978 - Leon Spinks defeated Muhammad Ali for heavyweight boxing championship. Ali regained the title on September 15 and became the person to win the title three times.

  6. 1968 - Garey Coleman born
    Diminutive actor Gary Coleman was born in Zion, Illinois. Despite a childhood of medical troubles, Coleman went on to become a television star in numerous situation comedies.

  7. 1968 - Officers killed three students during demonstration on the campus of South Carolina State in Orangeburg, South Carolina. Students were protesting segregation at an Orangeburg bowling alley.

  8. 1944 - Harry S. McAlphin - First African American to accredited to attend White House press conference.

  9. 1925 - Marcus Garvey entered federal prison in Atlanta. Students staged strike at Fisk University to protest policies of white administration.

  10. 1894 - Congress repeals the Enforcement Act which makes it easier for some states to disenfranchise African American voters.
flickr

Charleston Improvement Corp. Houses (1906-07), view02, 93-99 Church St, Charleston, SC, USA by Steve Minor
Via Flickr:
Charleston est. 1670, pop. 127,999 (2013) • No. 95 Church St • parcel of land formerly owned by the Charleston Hydraulic Press Company (1874), a large industrial complex during the last half of the 19th c. • purchased by Charleston Improvement Corporation, 1906 • led by businessman Tristram T. Hyde (1862-1931), later mayor of Charleston) • constructed mid-sized houses throughout Charleston, 1906-1930 • this was the company’s most extensive development • similar Queen Anne style gable ends & front piazzas varied slightly with double-tiered porches at No. 93 (now gone) & No. 97, pedimented entries & side piazzas at No. 95 & No. 99 Charleston Historic District, National Register # 66000964, 1969 • declared National Historic Landmark District, 1973

3

I mentioned in a previous post that I have been collecting license plates. It casually started as the prior owners of the first home we bought left many of their old Michigan vehicle plates still nailed to the back wall of the one-car detached garage in the backyard. Our family business was construction equipment and one of the many hats I wore was maintaining the fleet of plated vehicles and accumulated many more as they were eventually sold. Many of the plates I do have are Michigan ones from years gone back as the state would change the plate color from year to year before it was fashionable to have interesting graphics on them before simply saying ‘The Great Lakes State.’

I have been scratching my head on what to do with them when it comes time to downsize into the tiny house. The plates, until recent, were displayed on the garage walls, alphabetically arranged to create a border a few inches below the edge of the ceiling. They now fill a couple of milk crates.

I was on vacation 10+ years ago in Park City, Utah and first saw a license plate map for sale in an art gallery. I immediately wanted one for myself but couldn’t justify the art gallery price they wanted. Roll the clock forward to now and I have decided to make one myself.

So here’s my plea to you, my followers, should you have any old plates that you could spare and might care to donate to this cause. Please understand that this project is for my own use and not at all something that is going to made to be sold at any point, that it will be a prominent decorative feature in the tiny house.

Here is a list of the state plates that I still need to locate:

California
Colorado
Delaware
Georgia
Idaho
Iowa
Louisiana
Massachusetts
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Jersey

New Mexico - Have a plate but the state name is abbreviated to N.M. Are all their plates this way?

North Carolina
North Dakota
Oklahoma
Oregon
Rhode Island
South Carolina
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
Wyoming


Please message me if you would like to contribute a plate!

anonymous asked:

Is there anything fun to do in South Carolina? I'm from California and you know a lot of us kind of have this 'West Coast, Best Coast' mentality or whatever, so hearing that you actually live, work, and go to school in SC is so alien to me. How's that like??? Sending all my love. x 😚💕

Hello, darling!! Okay so I really really really love where I live so this is probably going to be a very long answer! 

So there’s a very important distinction I need to make first. I live in Charleston, South Carolina. Not just South Carolina. What’s the difference?

This is Charleston. And it is exactly as beautiful in real life as it is in this picture. Like, exactly.

This is the majority of the rest of South Carolina. Just like this, or worse in a lot of parts. (Never go to Myrtle Beach) (It’s literally just one big scab)

To be fair, there are a few other pockets of beautiful small towns, and there are some very pretty islands and beaches, but nothing compares to Charleston.

In Charleston, at least on the Peninsula, the “city” part, everything is very local, historical, and expensive af. It’s a very classy city, and despite all our tourists, we only have a few really tacky, touristy areas. Because of our good friend Mr. Gentrification, it’s almost impossible to live here unless you have buckets of money (my family lives across the bridge, where it’s cheaper but still absurdly nice) and all the more lower income communities are being pushed north into the bottom-less pit which is North Charleston (*cue dramatic music*).  But ignoring that, Charleston is absolutely beautiful. A big art scene. Beautiful buildings and parks and houses, and a bunch of tall pretty churches. Everything is really small and cozy and classy. Not a great nightlife though, and bands never go to Charleston since Atlanta and Charlotte are next door.

As for things to do, in South Carolina as a whole, there are two primary pastimes. The beach (if you’re near the coast) and FOOTBALL. South Carolina is such a football state, it’s disgusting. People all over the state drive for hours and hours to see college football during the fall, and it fucks with traffic. Which is another thing, the roads in South Carolina and in Charleston are absolute and complete shit. It’s a big mess.

And there’s another thing about living here. The racism! Yay!

Even though Charleston is definitely the most “liberal” part of South Carolina, we have our fair share of racists. Most notably, the neo-Nazi who murdered nine black Charlestonians at a Bible study almost exactly two years ago because they were black. Little fact: this particular neo-Nazi’s first target was going to be my college, which is a block away from the church. Since then, South Carolina sort of grew up a bit and took the Confederate Battle flag off the State House, and you don’t see it so much in Charleston anymore. Though, you do have the secessionist groups or whatever who love to parade around the city waving Confederate flags and starting fights. A few months ago, our school had this speaker named Bree Newsome. She’s a black activist who got arrested for removing a Confederate Battle flag from state house grounds after the shooting. The days before, everything was a mess because all the secessionists and whites got riled up over our college letting her speak, and people were putting up Confederate flags everywhere.

And that’s just in Charleston. I assume things are a lot more racist and, like, Southern in other parts of the state. So, like, that’s a big part of living here!

But no you should definitely come visit! It’s a beautiful beautiful city, and the people are generally very nice and welcoming, and there’s a lot to see! :D

North American Wizardry Schools (emphasis on the plural here people)

So I completely understand the frustration with JKR about Ilvermorny. Not only does she appropriate Native American cultures and disregard the history and diversity of this country, but she fails to recognize exactly how big the US is. There is no way that one school could possibly cater to all of North America and there is no possible way for them not to be unique. So, I propose these schools:

  • New England school located in Salem, Massachusetts

Caters to Maine, Vermont, New Hampshire, New York, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, West Virginia, and Virginia. It was founded by a colonist witch who had allied herself with the local Native tribes and married a Pequot man. The houses are, as a result, based upon Pequot legend/mythological creatures. After the Salem Witch Trials, the school aimed for self preservation by cloaking itself further from Muggles/No-Maj. Now people may only find the school if brought there by someone who has been there previously, but it fiercely excludes Muggles/No-Maj.

  • Southern school located in New Orleans, Louisiana

Caters to the East states below Virginia - Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, and Florida. It was founded by Marie Laveau, although she did not bother to hide the school as some of the other headmasters and headmistresses did. Her school had a special emphasis on voodoo magic and divination, which allowed her to practice more openly and influence the various citizens of New Orleans in their business decisions. Because of NOLA’s reputation, Muggles/No-Maj do not typically take the notion of a wizarding school seriously and merely attribute it to folklore. The houses of this school are based upon voodoo spirits (loa): Papa Legba, Marinette, Mami Wata, and Baron La Croix. Of course, integration with conventional magic has occurred since the opening of the school, but because of its reputation, many wizarding families are skeptical and often have their children attending one of the other schools.

  • South Dakota school located in Black Hills of South Dakota

Caters to Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana, Michigan, Illinois, Wisconsin, Minnesota, North Dakota, and South Dakota. It was founded by Sioux tribes in the area and mainly teaches Native Americans. However, as Muggle/No-Maj American politics began to affect the tribes, wizards outside of the tribes who also felt threatened by Muggles/No-Maj created an alliance with the Sioux, which led to other wizards to attend this school. The houses are based upon Sioux legends: Iktomi, Wakinyan (Thunderbird), Unktehi, Canoti.

  • Kansas school

Caters to Arkansas, Missouri, Iowa, Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas. The school was founded by a female Irish settler in 1856 who, admittedly, was not on good terms with the Native Americans of the region. The school and the Natives were often attacking one another and peace did not occur until the mid-1900′s. Still, assimilated Natives would occasionally attend. There were only two houses at the school based upon Irish myth: the Banshees and the Kelpies. Of course, as time passed, the students and faculty began to feel as though a change in the houses ought to be made since neither one of those creatures reside in Kansas. It has yet to happen.

  • Oregon school located in the Tillamook State Forest

Caters to Washington, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Wyoming. It was founded by the Tillamook Native Americans. Because of the settlers who came after the Lewis & Clark expedition, the Tillamook dwindled and the magical community felt the need to reach out to other tribes and to the white settling wizards to join the school for its survival. The houses were not created until after other tribes and white settlers joined the school, which led to a house based upon the Paiute legend of the Coyote, the Quiluete legend of the Q’wati, and the Chehalis legend of the Seatco.

  • Arizona school located in the Grand Canyon

Caters to California, Nevada, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. It was founded by Navajo Native Americans and hid itself in the Grand Canyon. The desert allowed for the school to be less concealed due to the smaller populations of Muggles/No-Maj around, particularly in the canyon. The houses were based around Navajo legends of the Anaye: Thelgeth, Delgeth, Tsenahale, and Binaye Ahani. If any wizarding families did not want to send their children to this school, they would either send their children to the one in Oregon, South Dakota, or Salem, but it is far less common to have the children transferred elsewhere than with the New Orleans school.

  • Hawaii & Alaska

Neither one of these states have their own schools. Hawaiian wizards go to the Pacific Islands while Alaskans go to a school in Canada.

anonymous asked:

Can you give us some facts about Adam that are a little rare or not known ??

I can try my best to give you some information that is not widely known, but most info that we don’t know already, will never be known :( 

-He liked the show The Whitest Kids U Know. It’s a really funny show I remember watching it in high school this is one of my favorite sketches:

-He enjoyed B horror movies from the 70s, 80s, and 90s. According to the report, he had a document on his computer in which he even reviewed several.

-He also wrote fiction. He wrote a screenplay about a man/boy relationship, and a short story in which babies attack a man and he has to fight them off.

-Most of the prescription medications he had been on and off throughout his life were primarily to treat body dysmorphic disorder, not Aspergers. 

-According to his fellow tech club member, Alan Diaz, he was not as withdrawn as the media depicted him to be during the time he encountered Adam. He basically said he was just a “stereotypical nerd.” No one who knew him ever recalled Adam being bullied, either.

-He would play DDR at the AMC theater in Danbury Connecticut with two different people: one an asian male around his age (interviewed in the official report,) and another a girl also about his age. People at the theater would call Adam “DDR guy,” and the girl, “DDR girl.” I’ve been trying so hard for a long time to find any further information about DDR girl, but I’ve failed. 

-He seemed to have had only one significant friend, however he cut off ties with this individual in the summer of 2012.

-The Sandy Hook Lighthouse blog, by Reed Coleman, for a while made a really good case that the youtube account, “fuckcomments,” was Adam’s. However, Reed went back and recanted his finding. If you do some googling, you can see a few replies and make the assertion yourself. To me the subject matter the account (which is now basically deleted) commented on definitely involves things Adam would be interested in: hating sex and porn, and also commenting on videos about eating disorders. BUT the grammar and lexicon used was very unlike Adam. 

-He liked the band Flogging Molly. He basically owned their entire discography.

-He also liked the band The Dickies

-He was very interested in Hiroo Onada, who was a Japanese Army intelligence officer from World War II.

-He played World of Warcraft with the character blarvink

-He liked and watched Mega 64 skits 

-There’s a lot of evidence suggesting the Lanza’s were going to move out of Connecticut. A family friend said Nancy was thinking about movie to Washington State, or South Carolina. Apparently Adam was more receptive to Washington State. This also explains why the house was in the state it was. 

-Peter, Adam’s father, said he rarely saw Adam angry save one time. He was driving and speaking with Adam about college. Adam was adamant about taking five courses at Western Connecticut State, while Peter suggested holding back and starting off with only a few. This apparently made Adam very mad.

Here is a really good video about Adam (that’s not conspiracy based)

I can definitely get back to this and post some more stuff. Sorry if this was mostly things we already know, Adam was good at covering his tracks and it seems they will never release his documents :( Check out Sandy Hook Lighthouse, Reed is great!

Republican wins U.S. House seat in S. Carolina

(CNBC) — Republican Ralph Norman has won a special election to fill the South Carolina congressional seat vacated by Mick Mulvaney, who resigned to work for President Donald Trump’s administration.

The millionaire real estate developer won Tuesday’s special election over Democrat Archie Parnell in the 5th District, which stretches north from Columbia toward the suburbs of Charlotte, North Carolina.

Norman, a former state lawmaker, ran a campaign aligning himself with President Donald Trump, who won this district in November by more than 18 percentage points. He emerged as the top vote-getter from a seven-way GOP primary and defeated state lawmaker Tommy Pope by just more than 200 votes in a runoff.

55 Little Known People in Black History
  1. Elijah Abel- (1808 –1884)- The first African-American elder and seventy in the Latter Day Saint movement, and one of the few black members in the early history of the Latter Day Saint movement to receive the priesthood.
  2. Jordan Anderson- (1825-1907) - A slave who following his emancipation, wrote a letter to his former master offering to work on his plantation. The letter has been described as a rare example of documented “slave humor” of the period and its deadpan style has been compared to the satire of Mark Twain
  3. Josephine Baker- (1906 –1975) - Born in the US but spent most of her life in France, Baker was the first black woman to star in a major motion picture, Zouzou (1934), or to become a world-famous entertainer. She assisted the French Resistance in WWII, receiving the Croix de guerre and was made a Chevalier of the Legion d'honneur.
  4. Ebenezer Bassett-(1833–1908)- The first African-American diplomat, serving as US ambassador to Haiti.
  5. Mary McLeod Bethune- (1875 –1955)- Built schools for African-Americans in Florida. 
  6. Stephen Bishop- (c. 1821–1857)- One of the lead explorers of Mammoth Cave, the longest cave system in the world.
  7. Blanche Bruce- (1841 –1898)- The first elected black senator to serve a full term.
  8. Absalom Boston- (1785–1855)- The first African-American captain to sail a whaleship, with an all-black crew.
  9. Melvin “Mel” Boozer-(1945 –1987)- Activist for African American, LGBT and HIV/AIDS issues. In 1980 he became the first openly gay candidate for Vice President of the United States, running on the Socialist ticket.
  10. William Wells Brown- (c.1814-1884)- Wrote Clotel the first novel published by an African American
  11. William Harvey Carney- (1840–1908)- The first African-American to be awarded the Medal of Honor for his gallantry during the Battle of Fort Wagner in 1863. 
  12. Wentworth Cheswell- (1748 –1817)- The first African American elected to public office in the history of the United States, being elected town constable of Newmarket, New Hampshire in 1768.
  13. Fanny Jackson Coppin- (1837 –1913)- An African-American educator and missionary and a lifelong advocate for female higher education.
  14. Martin Delany- (1818 –1885) Abolitionist, journalist, physician, and writer, and arguably the first proponent of black nationalism. He was one of the first three blacks admitted to Harvard Medical School.
  15. Storm DeLarverie- (1920 –2014)- A butch lesbian whose scuffle with police was one of the defining moments of the Stonewall uprising, spurring the crowd to action. She was nicknamed “the Rosa Parks of the gay community.”
  16. James Derham- (c. 1757-1802?)- The first African American to formally practice medicine in the United States though he never received an M.D. degree.
  17. Father Divine- (c. 1876 –1965)- An African American spiritual leader from about 1907 until his death. Father Divine made numerous contributions toward his followers’ economic independence and racial equality.
  18. Mary Fields- (c. 1832–1914)- The first African-American woman employed as a mail carrier in the United States and the second woman to work for the United States Postal Service.
  19. Henry Ossian Flipper- (1856–1940)- The first African American to graduate from the United States Military Academy at West Point
  20. Gordon- (dates unknown)- A slave on a Louisiana plantation who made his escape from bondage in March 1863.The pictures of Gordon’s scourged back provided Northerners with visual evidence of brutal treatment of slaves and inspired many free blacks to enlist in the Union Army.
  21. Samuel Green- (c. 1802–1877)- Minister who was jailed in 1857 for possessing a copy of the anti-slavery novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe.
  22. Nero Hawley- (1742–1817)- Slave who was enlisted in place of his owner, Daniel Hawley, in the Continental Army on April 20, 1777 during the American Revolution and earned his freedom.
  23. Jupiter Hammon- (1711 – before 1806)- The first African-American writer to be published in the present-day United States. He is considered one of the founders of African-American literature.
  24. Michael A. Healy- (1839 –1904)- Nicknamed “Hell Roaring Mike,” Healy has been identified as the first man of African-American descent to command a ship of the United States government. Healy patrolled the 20,000 miles (32,000 km) of Alaskan coastline for more than 20 years, earning great respect from the natives and seafarers alike.
  25. Hercules- (c. 1755-Unknown)- Slave who worked as a cook for George Washington. Hercules escaped to freedom from Mount Vernon in 1797, and later was legally manumitted under the terms of Washington’s Will.
  26. DeHart Hubbard- (1903 -1976)- The first African American to win an Olympic gold medal in an individual event; the running long jump at the 1924 Paris Summer games.
  27. Abdulrahman Ibrahim Ibn Sori- (1762-1829)- A West African prince who was brought as a slave to the US. After 40 years own slavery, he was freed as a result of negotiations between the Sultan of Morocco and President John Quincy Adams.
  28. Thomas L. Jennings- (1791–1856)- The first African American to be granted a patent for his invention of a dry-cleaning process
  29. Anthony Johnson-(c.1600 –1670) - An Angolan who achieved freedom in the early 17th-century Colony of Virginia, where he became one of the first African American property owners and slaveholders.
  30. Matilda Sissieretta Joyner Jones- (1868/1869 –1933)- First African american to sing at Carnegie Hall.
  31. Barbara Jordan- (1936 –1996)- The first African American elected to the Texas Senate after Reconstruction, the first southern black female elected to the United States House of Representatives, and the first African-American woman to deliver a keynote address at a Democratic National Convention.
  32. Henrietta Lacks- (1920-1951) - An African-American woman who was the unwitting source of cells from her cancerous tumor which were cultured  to create the first known human immortal cell line for medical research.
  33. Edmond Lewis- (1844 –1907)- The first African-American woman to achieve international acclaim as a sculptor.
  34. Henry Berry Lowrie- (c. 1845-Unknown)- Robin Hood style outlaw who targeted the Confederate government of North Carolina during the US Civil War and the KKK after it. He was never captured although many believe he died of injuries sustained in a 1872 robbery.
  35. Mary Eliza Mahoney- (1845 –1926)- The first African American to study and work as a professionally trained nurse in the United States, graduating in 1879
  36. Jean Saint Malo-(Unknown-1784)- Escaped Spanish slave who led guerrilla attacks against the Colonial Spanish govemrnt of Louisiana
  37. Hattie McDaniel- (1895 –1952)-  First African-Americna to win the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress fro her role as Mammy in Gone with the Wind
  38. Doris Miller- (1919 –1943)- The first African American to be awarded the Navy Cross. During the attack on Pearl Harbor Miller, then a cook on the U.S.S West Virginia, manned a gun tower, firing until he ran out of ammunition. He became an icon for African-American serving in the war.
  39. Tom Molineaux- (1784 –1818)- An African-American bare-knuckle boxer. He spent much of his career in Great Britain and Ireland, where he had some notable successes.
  40. P. B. S. Pinchback- (1837 –1921) - The first person of African descent to become governor of a U.S. state, serving as Governor of Louisiana for 15 days.
  41. George Poage- (1880–1962)- The first African-American athlete to win a medal in the Olympic Games, winning two bronze medals at the 1904 games.
  42. Bass Reeves- (1838-1910)- First black Deputy U.S. Marshals who arrested over 3,000 felons and shot and killed fourteen outlaws in self-defense. It is believed that he may have been the inspiration for The Lone Ranger.
  43. Hiram Rhodes Revels- (1827 –1901)-  The first African American to serve in the United States Senate, and was the first African American to serve in the U.S. Congress.
  44. John Rock-(1825–1866)- First African-American man to earn a medical degree and the first black person to be admitted to the bar of the Supreme Court of the United States. He coined the phrase “Black is Beautiful”
  45. Robert Smalls- (1839 –1915)- Slave who commandeered a Confederate transport ship, CSS Planter, in Charleston harbor, and sailed it from Confederate controlled waters to the U.S. blockade. he was later elected to the South Carolina State legislature and the United States House of Representatives
  46. D. Augustus Straker- (1842-1908)- Barbadian who immigrated to the United States to educate former slaves. In 1890, he became the first Black lawyer to appear before the Michigan Supreme Court, arguing that "separate but equal" was unconstitutional according to Michigan law
  47. Augustus Tolton- (1854-1897) - First African American to be ordained a Roman Catholic priest. In 2011 he was named a “Servant of God” one of the first steps toward sainthood.
  48. Alexander Twilight- (1795–1857) - The first African American elected as a state legislator, serving in the Vermont General Assembly.
  49. Colonel Tye- (c.1753—1780)- New Jerseyan slave who escaped to fight for the British during the American Revolution. He was one of the most effective guerrilla leaders opposing the American rebel forces in central New Jersey.
  50. Moses Fleetwood Walker- (1856 -1924)- The first African American to play Major League Baseball. After leaving baseball, Walker became a businessman and advocate of Black nationalism.
  51. Robert C. Weaver- (1907–1997)- The first African American to be appointed to a US cabinet-level position, serving as Secretary of Housing and Urban Development from 1966-1968.
  52. Phillis Wheatley- (c. 1753 –1784)- The first African-American poet to have her work published.
  53. Cathay Williams- (1844-1892)- The first African-American female to enlist, and the only documented to serve in the United States Army posing as a man, under the pseudonym William Cathay.
  54. Marcos Xiorro-(Unknown-1821)- An African slave who, in 1821, planned and conspired to lead a slave revolt against the sugar plantation owners and the Spanish Colonial government in Puerto Rico. Although the conspiracy was unsuccessful, he achieved legendary status among the slaves and is part of Puerto Rico’s folklore.
  55. York- (1770?–1822?)- Slave who was part of the Lewis and Clark expedition. He gained the respect to the rest of the expedition and is believed to have been given his freedom or escaped to freedom following their return the the US. 
2

Books take us to many places…


NOTE~ These are just some of my favorites that I could actually put on a map. For those who don’t immediately recognize what books the names are from: 

*real places

WORLD MAP

  • Panem- The Hunger Games!
  • Opium- House of the Scorpion
  • The Scorch- The Maze Runner/The Scorch Trials
  • Hogwarts- HARRY POTTER :D (J.K. Rowling has said that it’s in Scotland)
  • Ravka- Shadow and Bone (inspired by Soviet Russia)
  • The London Institute (London, England*)- The Infernal Devices
  • Yokohama, Japan*- Extras (Uglies Book 4)
  • Prague, Czech Republic*- Daughter of Smoke and Bone
  • The Kasbah, Morocco- Dreams of Gods and Monsters (Daughter of Smoke and Bone Book 3)

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA MAP

  • Chicago, Illinois*- Divergent (though I’m not sure if Tris ever called it by that name)
  • Gatlin, South Carolina- Beautiful Creatures
  • The Wilds, outside of Portland, Maine*- Delirium
  • New Orleans, Louisiana*- The Chronicles of Nick
  • Camp Half-Blood (Long Island, New York*)- Percy Jackson and the Olympians
  • St. Vladimir’s Academy, Montana- Vampire Academy
  • Perdido Beach, California- Gone
  • Uglyville (Reno, Nevada*)- Uglies (Scott Westerfeld confirmed this is where Tally lives, in Bogus to Bubbly)
  • Forks, Washington*- Twilight
  • The Graveyard, southwest Arizona*- Unwind
  • Denver, Colorado*- The Death Cure (The Maze Runner Book 3)
  • Rosewood, Pennsylvania- Pretty Little Liars (inspired by Rosemont, PA)
  • Thurmond (Virginia)- The Darkest Minds
  • Camp Jupiter (San Francisco, California*)- Heroes of Olympus
  • Los Angeles, California*- Legend
  • The Brooklyn Institute (Brooklyn, New York*)- The Mortal Instruments
  • A suburb near Portland, Oregon*- If I Stay
Behind the Lens: Photographing the President in 50 States

by Pete Souza, Chief Official White House Photographer

This week, the President will visit South Dakota, marking the 50th state he has visited during his administration (as such, it’s also my 50th state with him). To mark the occasion, I chose one photograph from each state that we’ve visited. This was not as easy as I thought it would be. With help from photo editor Phaedra Singelis, I tried to depict a variety of situations. Some are more lighthearted; some are sad, and some are poignant. Some are with the Vice President; some are with the First Lady, and a couple are with the entire family. A selection of photos are centered on policy, and others on politics. Some focus on the President as Commander-in-Chief – others on his role as consoler for the nation.

I hope you enjoy this gallery. And stay tuned – we’ll be adding a photograph from South Dakota following his visit there on Friday.

Alabama, 2015

Alabama, March 7, 2015. Marching at the 50th Anniversary of Bloody Sunday in Selma. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

Alaska, 2009

Alaska. Nov 12, 2009. Air Force One refueling at Elmendorf Air Force Base. (Official White House photo by Pete Souza)

Arizona, 2009

Arizona, Aug. 16, 2009. Viewing the Grand Canyon. (Official White House photo by Pete Souza)

Arkansas, 2014

Arkansas. May 7, 2014. Touring tornado damage in Vilonia. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

California, 2014

California, July 23, 2014. Viewing the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

Colorado, 2014

Colorado, July 8, 2014. Playing pool with Gov. John Hickenlooper in Denver. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

Connecticut, 2012

Connecticut, Dec. 16, 2012. Making last-minute edits to his speech in Newtown, before a vigil for those killed at Sandy Hook Elementary School. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

Delaware, 2009

Delaware, Oct. 29, 2009. Honoring fallen soldiers from Afghanistan at Dover Air Force Base. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

Florida, 2015

Florida, April 22, 2015. Keeping his distance from a baby alligator on Earth Day at Everglades National Park. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

Georgia, 2013

Georgia, May 19, 2013. Graduates cheering the President during a heavy downpour at Morehouse College in Atlanta. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

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