thankful for insurance

Every time I think about having to be an adult I get so mad. Like I want to call around to see if I can get lower car insurance but I literally have no idea what I would be saying. Besides “I want cheaper car insurance”. Like wtf is a premium, wtf does 100/300/100 mean, how much insurance do i need???

Heartbreak Insurance

Words: 10.9k
Genre: FLUFF.

Read more at Service Series

Ring Ri-

He bursts into a bright huge grin, despite not being seen. “Thank you for calling Heartbreak Insurance. My name is Jimin! How may I help you today?”

There’s a long silence over the phone until there’s a slight sniffle and the woman on the other line explodes into a hysterical sob. “HUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUGHH…nnn..nnn-” It’s a type of uncontrollable bawling howl that makes your snot drip inside your mouth .

“I’ll connect you to our customer services~ Please don’t hang up the line. One moment please!” Jimin moves the phone handset into his other hand while he presses some buttons, successfully transferring her over a second later.


The average person falls in love 4 to 7 times before marriage and 40% to 50% of all marriages end in divorce. 85% of all relationships end with a breakup. Don’t just be a statistic!

At Heartbreak Insurance, we are committed to be there when you need it most. Affordable and comprehensible solutions to meet your needs today! With our Heartbreak Insurance, you can find a plan that fits your needs. We cover and care for you in your most vulnerable times, offering paid time off, therapy sessions and care packages.

Because heartbreak is pain too.


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i just signed up for healthcare on healthcare.gov, and i have health insurance. Thanks Obama. This is probably the last year I’ll be covered I think.

Fuck, Hillary should have won. I need dat health coverage yo

Statement from President Barack Obama on the 7th Anniversary of the Affordable Care Act

When I took office, millions of Americans were locked out of our health care system.  So, just as leaders in both parties had tried to do since the days of Teddy Roosevelt, we took up the cause of health reform.  It was a long battle, carried out in Congressional hearings and in the public square for more than a year.  But ultimately, after a century of talk, decades of trying, and a year of bipartisan debate, our generation was the one that succeeded.  We finally declared that in America, health care is not a privilege for a few, but a right for everybody.

The result was the Affordable Care Act, which I signed into law seven years ago today.  Thanks to this law, more than twenty million Americans have gained the security and peace of mind of health insurance.  Thanks to this law, more than ninety percent of Americans are insured – the highest rate in our history.  Thanks to this law, the days when women could be charged more than men and Americans with pre-existing conditions could be denied coverage altogether are relics of the past.  Seniors have bigger discounts on their prescription drugs.  Young people can stay on their parents’ plans until they turn 26 years old.  And Americans who already had insurance received an upgrade as well – from free preventive care, like mammograms and vaccines, to improvements in the quality of care in hospitals that has averted nearly 100,000 deaths so far.

All of that is thanks to the Affordable Care Act.  And all the while, since the law passed, the pace of health care inflation has slowed dramatically.  Prices are still rising, just as they have every year for decades – but under this law, they’ve been rising at the slowest rate in fifty years.  Families who get coverage through their employer are paying, on average, thousands of dollars less per year than if costs kept rising as fast as they were before the law.  And reality continues to discredit the false claim that this law is in a “death spiral,” because while it’s true that some premiums have risen, the vast majority of Marketplace enrollees have experienced no average premium hike at all.  And so long as the law is properly administered, this market will remain stable.  Likewise, this law is no “job-killer,” because America’s businesses went on a record-breaking streak of job growth in the seven years since I signed it.

So the reality is clear:  America is stronger because of the Affordable Care Act.  There will always be work to do to reduce costs, stabilize markets, improve quality, and help the millions of Americans who remain uninsured in states that have so far refused to expand Medicaid.  I’ve always said we should build on this law, just as Americans of both parties worked to improve Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid over the years.  So if Republicans are serious about lowering costs while expanding coverage to those who need it, and if they’re prepared to work with Democrats and objective evaluators in finding solutions that accomplish those goals – that’s something we all should welcome.  But we should start from the baseline that any changes will make our health care system better, not worse for hardworking Americans.  That should always be our priority.

The Affordable Care Act is law only because millions of Americans mobilized, and organized, and decided that this fight was about more than health care – it was about the character of our country.  It was about whether the wealthiest nation on Earth would make sure that neither illness nor twist of fate would rob us of everything we’ve worked so hard to build.  It was about whether we look out for one another, as neighbors, and fellow citizens, who care about each other’s success.  This fight is still about all that today.  And Americans who love their country still have the power to change it.

anonymous asked:

Hey how ya doing? Well I'm doing just fine. I'm sorry I lied I'm dyin insiiide~

Doing fine! I’m sorry things aren’t going well for you D: I hope things get better for you. And they will eventually, all things pass.

If it makes you feel better last night kind of fell apart for me too. A bunch of crap came up that I had to take care of, didn’t get to edit much. Nothing really serious, just tedious and frustrating.

I feel like I need to say a quick thank you.

Thank you to everyone who felt as if voting for their conscience was more important than voting to keep other people safe.

Thank you for making me, a queer woman, feel as if my life is in danger in my home.

Thank you for putting the lives of my African American, Latinx, and Muslim friends at risk.

Thank you for deciding that my peers with chronic illnesses don’t deserve health insurance.

Thank you for deciding that my body is not my own to control.

Thank you for destroying our environment and causing our climate change.

Thank you for devaluing our economy.

Thank you for putting the country in the control of a man who’s idea of respecting women is to grab them and molest them.

Thank you for teaching our teenage girls that their body doesn’t belong to them.

Thank you for telling our LGBT+ community that they don’t deserve basic human rights.

And thank you for letting a man who openly admits to racist, sexist, and homophobic actions be in control of one of the most powerful countries in the world.

3

DAVE: honestly who wants to bully someone who could literally crush them like a bug
DAVE: i mean come on 
DAVE: (on that note)
DAVE: (i for one am pretty damn confident in my own ‘imaginary suit of armor’ thank you very much)
DAVE: (’insurance’ is always a nice thing to keep on hand–even in cases where it aint exactly something youve needed to ask for)

When I took office, millions of Americans were locked out of our health care system. So, just as leaders in both parties had tried to do since the days of Teddy Roosevelt, we took up the cause of health reform. It was a long battle, carried out in Congressional hearings and in the public square for more than a year. But ultimately, after a century of talk, decades of trying, and a year of bipartisan debate, our generation was the one that succeeded. We finally declared that in America, health care is not a privilege for a few, but a right for everybody.

The result was the Affordable Care Act, which I signed into law seven years ago today. Thanks to this law, more than twenty million Americans have gained the security and peace of mind of health insurance. Thanks to this law, more than ninety percent of Americans are insured – the highest rate in our history. Thanks to this law, the days when women could be charged more than men and Americans with pre-existing conditions could be denied coverage altogether are relics of the past. Seniors have bigger discounts on their prescription drugs. Young people can stay on their parents’ plans until they turn 26 years old. And Americans who already had insurance received an upgrade as well – from free preventive care, like mammograms and vaccines, to improvements in the quality of care in hospitals that has averted nearly 100,000 deaths so far.

All of that is thanks to the Affordable Care Act. And all the while, since the law passed, the pace of health care inflation has slowed dramatically. Prices are still rising, just as they have every year for decades – but under this law, they’ve been rising at the slowest rate in fifty years. Families who get coverage through their employer are paying, on average, thousands of dollars less per year than if costs kept rising as fast as they were before the law. And reality continues to discredit the false claim that this law is in a “death spiral,” because while it’s true that some premiums have risen, the vast majority of Marketplace enrollees have experienced no average premium hike at all. And so long as the law is properly administered, this market will remain stable. Likewise, this law is no “job-killer,” because America’s businesses went on a record-breaking streak of job growth in the seven years since I signed it.

So the reality is clear: America is stronger because of the Affordable Care Act. There will always be work to do to reduce costs, stabilize markets, improve quality, and help the millions of Americans who remain uninsured in states that have so far refused to expand Medicaid. I’ve always said we should build on this law, just as Americans of both parties worked to improve Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid over the years. So if Republicans are serious about lowering costs while expanding coverage to those who need it, and if they’re prepared to work with Democrats and objective evaluators in finding solutions that accomplish those goals – that’s something we all should welcome. But we should start from the baseline that any changes will make our health care system better, not worse for hardworking Americans. That should always be our priority.

The Affordable Care Act is law only because millions of Americans mobilized, and organized, and decided that this fight was about more than health care – it was about the character of our country. It was about whether the wealthiest nation on Earth would make sure that neither illness nor twist of fate would rob us of everything we’ve worked so hard to build. It was about whether we look out for one another, as neighbors, and fellow citizens, who care about each other’s success. This fight is still about all that today. And Americans who love their country still have the power to change it.

I am so thankful for dental insurance.

Today’s root canal turned out to be just 130 bucks out of pocket. AND insurance covered more for my wisdom teeth last month than the surgeon thought they would, so we’re getting almost 200 dollars back at the end of the month.

I almost want to cry. Finally getting my teeth taken care of is amazing.

I must need new boys to text, but thank god
for heath insurance. I haven’t brushed my hair in days and,
finally, I had to take the scissors to my hair, cut away
all the knots. I have this dirty habit of smiling at strange men
as they call to me from across the street,
make sure I leave them with the good strong image
of my hips swinging. Everything is a hangnail,
or a pile of laundry waiting to be done. I go to parties
and it feels like everyone glows in the dark.
It’s so weird because I curse in front of my mother
and she laughs and says finally and gives me 
money for rent, food, whatever. I don’t eat, 
just sit on the porch and smoke cigarettes 
and watch boys go to class and press my thighs together.
I look at prices for laser hair removal, bikini waxes,
organic manicures. The smell of silk makes me weep.
Walking alone at night is a lot like how being black feels.
But I put that away, I don’t talk about it, because shit.
Y'all got enough of our blood spilling into the street.
—  Kristina Haynes, “A Portrait of the Poet: Age 23″

Ace of DIamond II, Chapter 22 Raws + short summary

I’m sorry, but because of various personal circumstances, scanlated chapter will be released a bit later than usual (hopefully tomorrow evening). Collective blame has been dropped on the proofreader.

I had to hurry up so there might be discrepancies and weird english…..

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