thankful for insurance

Real advice

So a lot of you on here are teens and might be getting ready to be out on your own. Here are some things I learned the hard way or that are just good to know.

  • Never smoke or quit if you are currently. The cost of addictive smoking is more than half your groceries a month AND the bodily cost will surprise you.
  • Drink water. Yeah okay I know this one sucks but water is much much cheaper than soda, trust me. Your skin will thank you.
  • Send thank you cards. Don’t have any? Get the cheap ones and send those. It doesn’t matter how nice they are, the fact that you sent a thank you card matters. Send it for gifts, people calling you to check on you, those adults who helped you move, and even people who interview you.
  • Withhold 1. Okay so speaking of jobs, on your forms (US) where you are trying to figure out your tax withholding, put one. Yourself. It’s an easy way to make sure you don’t owe $2,000 in April and you still get a pretty decent check. 
  • No pets. If you don’t have a pet now, don’t get one. It’s super hard to get an apartment that will let you have a pet when you are first starting out. Wait until you are a bit older and can afford to rent more than a one bedroom apartment. 
  • Insurance. You’re young, so why do you need life insurance? Because that’s the best time to get it. Yeah, it’s a dumb expense to pay right now, but if you get it early, you can afford it. The longer you wait, the more expensive it is. Car insurance is going to be high for a few years, but it will drop around 22 and 25 years old. Health insurance usually comes through your job and please don’t ignore it. Renter’s insurance is usually pretty cheap and it covers you if there is a fire or natural disaster and you have to go back home to mom.
  • Off brand. This goes for food, clothing, makeup, and cleaning supplies and just about anything else you can think of. For food, Aldi’s is your best friend. I can go fill up a cart of just food and it will cost maybe $70. the same amount of food at Walmart is easily over $150. You can of course be picky, but try to get the majority of your food off brand. Hygiene products too. Goodwill is great for clothes, but plan a trip. Save like 60 bucks and drive near a big city where the rich people live. Go to the goodwill there. You can basically get an all new wardrobe for pennies on the dollar. Makeup is tricky. It can be really really expensive but you don’t really have to buy all of it name brand. Pick whats most important to you. I prefer eye shadows and lipsticks name brand and I deal with everything else from the drugstore. With he right techniques, you can make it look expensive. As for cleaning, I always use dollar tree stuff minus my laundry detergent because of allergies. Bleach, stain spray, and vinegar are gonna be your best friends,.
  • Car. Okay so yeah, that brand new car is nice and sure, maybe you can afford it. For now. Disaster will strike. Something will come up and bam, you’re stuck choosing if you want to walk everywhere or eat. Try getting a slightly used car, such as one of the ones they let people test drive a lot or a car that has previously been leased. Just as nice and much MUCH cheaper. And I have gotten THREE cars with no down payment so don’t let them tell you you can’t. But it is nice to put it down,even $100. 
  • Negotiate. Don’t be afraid to haggle with people. Yeah it’s intimidating but it’s 10 minutes of your life versus hundreds of dollars a year. What can you negotiate? Almost anything. Car payment. Rent. Insurance. Hospital bills. Even due dates for the bills you can’t negotiate on. Also, if something comes up where you have to skip a payment on something, call them. Give them like $25 and explain your situation. Ask if your payment date can be moved with the $25 as a goodwill promise to pay the rest later. It works. They would rather move your date than send you to collections. 
  • Collectors. Okay so this one is tricky. If you have fallen behind and owe a collector, don’t fret. I do too, even as I write this. Owing a collector means that the original service has been paid (health bills, credit card ect) and you are now paying the people who paid your bill. (I know it’s confusing) however, they will usually want the entirety of what they paid for you in 6 months. Meaning if they just paid a bill for you that was $3,000, they are gonna ask for $500 a month. That’s rent. That’s crazy. Tell them outright what you can afford and don’t lie about it either. If you can afford $100, tell them that. If you can afford $50, tell them that. If you can’t afford to pay them anything when they call you, let them know when you can. If you can’t afford it when you told them you could, don’t answer your phone to a number you don’t know. I know that sounds horrible but if you are renting an apartment, renting a car, and literally own nothing, they can’t do much to you. Just pay when you can and try to maybe pick up some extra shifts at work to make a payment. I have been dodging collectors for about three years. I owe I think three right now. I pay ONE of them a month, but it’s a large payment to keep them quiet for a while. I do not suggest this for you, I am just letting you know what I do.
  • Credit Cards. Okay, the big one. Many adults will tell you to never ever get a credit card and that’s just not feasible in this world. However, it can be addicting to be able to go to Walmart when you are negative in your bank account and get that $10 movie. I mean, it’s just 10 bucks right? WRONG. It will build up fast and soon the one credit card you have will be maxed. So you have to get another for emergencies. And another. And so on. So here’s my advice; Get a credit card through the same bank as your checking and tell them to put a limit on it and not let it raise. Then lock that sucker away and forget you have it until a real emergency comes up like a flat tire, short on money for groceries, or that collector that hasn’t been paid in 4 months. You can make it on one credit card if you are strict with your money, which I am sure you don’t have a lot of.
  • Budget. Speaking of money, write out a budget for yourself. Don’t know how? Here’s the easiest way. Most people get paid bi-weekly so here’s how to do it. Make two columns, Check 1 and Check 2. If you have a full time job you know about how much your checks are going to be so put the amount at the top of each column. Now that hard part - figure out what is due when. Is something due June 1st? Take it out of check 2 (end of May). Is something due May 14? Take it out of check 1 (beginning of May). That main thought process behind your budget is that you want to have the money for a bill set aside before it’s due. Paying a bill a few days early is a great way to make a good financial reputation for yourself and for some things even build credit. Now if you get paid bi-weekly, you will sometimes have a month where you get 3 checks. DON’T BLOW IT. Put it right back into your budget as Check 1 and keep the flow going. If you prepay bills, like your car or your rent or your credit card, and stay a month a head of those big ones, you may need that wiggle room later. If your car, for instance, is paid ahead 1 month, you can use the car money you would normally pay that month for maybe some extra groceries or some small emergency without using your credit card and you won’t even fall behind! You’ll just be back to owing every month instead of being ahead. It’s like a savings account without the temptation to blow the money. 
  • Simplicity. Enjoy simple things. A gym is expensive, go for a walk instead. Cable is expensive, pay for internet. Phones are expensive, get on a family plan (there is no shame in staying on your parent’s plan, just pay your share). Food is expensive, enjoy leftovers. Movies are expensive, go early and resist any snacks. Shopping is expensive, go to the mall and spend all day trying on cute clothes and taking selfes in the dressing room (makes you feel like a million bucks sometimes!). Time is expensive because you don’t have a lot of it so If you want to stay in bed all day on your day off, do it. If you want to binge on your day off, do it. If you want to just play board games with friends on a Saturday night with a few beers, do it. Simple fun is way better for your pocket and your anxiety.
  • Mental Health  - speaking of anxiety, make sure you take care of your brain. Go outside, even if it means sitting on your steps. Wake up early, even for just an hour. Don’t burn yourself out at work or school because you will suffer the consequences. Make a schedule. If you have trouble with timekeeping, ask for help. If you feel you do have a real mental disorder, see if your employer has what’s called and EAP program (employee assistance program). They usually help you find a mental health provider and give you a few visits for free. This will help you narrow down what exactly you have and after you’re free visits are up you can see who is in your health insurance network that can provide you the mental care you need. if you are prescribed drugs, always get generic. If there is no generic, ask for an alternative. I will not lie to you, mental health is the hardest thing to treat. It took me 8 years and a lot of money to figure out the right medication cocktail for me and my bipolar/ schizophrenia (yes I have both). Turns out I only need two pills, and if I were to refill both of them right now, I wouldn’t even pay $10 thanks to my health insurance (which sucks but at least it’s there) and because I got generics. Also, talk therapy can be pricey but sometimes only a few sessions can change your life. I have literally only been to talk therapy 11 times in my life and that was to deal with PTSD, bipolar, schizophrenia, and suicidal tendencies. 11 sessions. That’s 11 hours. And yeah, I paid over $400 out of pocket for those collectively. But if I hadn’t I would probably be dead right now so it was worth it.
  • Connections. Calling your friends is awesome because sometimes, it’s free therapy. And okay, maybe you’re 19 and you still have a horrible relationship with your parents. It’s okay. I am 25 and I still have problems with my parents. My whole family actually. Social media is a kind of safety net for me because that’s where I can be myself. Find where you can be yourself, it will help you stay sane.
  • Clean. Sometimes when I feel crappy, I take a shower. I clean the living room. I do the dishes. I vacuum. I mop. I open the windows. I get the trash out of the house. Change into some clean clothes. Organize my desk. Clean out your closet and put all your unwanted clothes in bags to donate. Just a small amount of cleaning can make you feel like you accomplished something. 
  • Hobbies. This one is a little hard too. It depends on your personality, your budget, and how much free time you have. Drawing , singing, and writing are free. Exercising can be free if you run or walk in the park. But most hobbies do actually cost money. Video games, playing an instrument, painting, sewing, cooking/baking, making things - those all cost money. Some of them lots of money. But you have to have a hobby outside of social network, sleeping, and working. It’s another thing to keep you sane and it’s just a good idea.
  • Toxic people. Do not be afraid to cut people out of your life that do nothing but make you feel bad about yourself or insult your life. This could mean breaking up with your partner, unfriending a person from your social circle, cutting out a whole circle of people, or even not talking to a relative(s). It’s not easy for some people but if they do not build you up, they will only tear you down. 
  • Drink at home. Okay so this one might sound like a no brainer, but I’ll explain it anyway. Packs of beer and hard liquor bottles are cheaper than a pint and a shots at the bar. Bottles of wine are cheaper than a glass at a restaurant. It’s never okay to drive drunk or even after one bottle of beer. NEVER. Staying at home is cheaper all around and you can drink in your pajamas while watching Finding Nemo on loop. Or invite some friends over and create a drinking game out of a show, a game you already have, or just talk and drink. 
  • Sleep. This one is so important. You need a good bed and a quiet, dark place to sleep. If you are scared of the dark, get a night light. Can’t sleep in silence? Get a fan. I have both of these and they help. You’re brain will feel tired if you ‘slept’ for 12 hours but only got 1 hour of REM. REM can really only happen every night if you are in a calm and dim environment. Quality of sleep will effect your eating habits, your emotional state, your mental stability, and your ability to make rational decisions among other things. 

So these are obviously just a few things, but I feel they are important to share. Please feel free to add any and reblog it for those about to enter adulthood. 

One time I was playing the sims and I wanted to make me and mike but I wanted to make us separately and have us meet. But when I moved into my house, I had this sexy ass neighbor. I figured I could have a fling with him and break it off and get with Mike later but then the neighbors kid got attached to me and I couldn’t just end it when I was so close to his daughter. I really cared about him too.

So the only thing I could do was have it end in tragedy. That way I wouldn’t have to break up with the guy and I could adopt his daughter to stay close to her. He passed away peacefully on fire in the kitchen. Now in previous games, when a kid is taken away by CPS, the next kid you adopt is the same kid. Welp that didn’t carry over into sims 4 so the daughter ended up being taken away and erased from the game by the great sims deity.

I’m a sentimental man, so I kept neighbor mans tombstone around. I’d occasionally chat with his ghost, but he seemed cold to me. I can’t help but thinking he was a bit mad his daughter no longer existed. But this escalated once I started seeing Mike. His ethereal visits became more frequent and more hostile, usually breaking my electronics or creating a mess. But he went overboard when he started the fire.

Being a sim the died in a fire, his ghost had certain abilities specific to his death (setting fires). He got pissed because I kissed Mike so he set my couch on fire that ended up barricading us in the bedroom. Now I couldn’t find the fire alarm in buy mode and I hadn’t had the foresight to predict my spiteful ghost died-in-a-fire ex boyfriend would be an afterlife arsonist to care about it that much so a lot of the house had burned by the time I could get the FD there.

After having almost nothing covered by insurance (thanks Obama), Mike sat me down to have a talk with me. While I couldn’t understand him, I imagine he said “What the fuck you need to deal with your crazy ass ex boyfriend ghost. This never would have happened if you weren’t a thirst little sim bitch and dated me first.”

I approached the grave. It was time to release him. He was waiting for me. He knew this was the end. That after this, there was no coming back from the afterlife. I know he tried to kill me, and he knows I got his daughter deleted, but at that moment, it was just like old times. Telling each other jokes 27 times in a row until he would have sex with me.

We had a final ghostly embrace and he was gone. I sold his tombstone for 300 bucks and bought a microwave.

Breaking: GOP health care plan would cause 23 million people to lose insurance, CBO says

  • The American Health Care Act would cause 23 million people to lose health insurance over the next decade, and would disproportionally impact older, poorer Americans, according to an analysis released Wednesday by the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office.
  • The 23 million people losing insurance thanks to the AHCA is not a substantial difference from an earlier version of the GOP health care plan, which Republicans say makes good on their promise to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act — better known as Obamacare.
  • House Republicans passed an amended version of the AHCA earlier this month, sending the GOP’s long-promised “Obamacare repeal” bill to the Senate. Read more (5/24/17 4:45 PM)
Heartbreak Insurance

Words: 10.9k
Genre: FLUFF.

Read more at Service Series

Cr.

Ring Ri-

He bursts into a bright huge grin, despite not being seen. “Thank you for calling Heartbreak Insurance. My name is Jimin! How may I help you today?”

There’s a long silence over the phone until there’s a slight sniffle and the woman on the other line explodes into a hysterical sob. “HUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUGHH…nnn..nnn-” It’s a type of uncontrollable bawling howl that makes your snot drip inside your mouth .

“I’ll connect you to our customer services~ Please don’t hang up the line. One moment please!” Jimin moves the phone handset into his other hand while he presses some buttons, successfully transferring her over a second later.


The average person falls in love 4 to 7 times before marriage and 40% to 50% of all marriages end in divorce. 85% of all relationships end with a breakup. Don’t just be a statistic!

At Heartbreak Insurance, we are committed to be there when you need it most. Affordable and comprehensible solutions to meet your needs today! With our Heartbreak Insurance, you can find a plan that fits your needs. We cover and care for you in your most vulnerable times, offering paid time off, therapy sessions and care packages.

Because heartbreak is pain too.


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Every time I think about having to be an adult I get so mad. Like I want to call around to see if I can get lower car insurance but I literally have no idea what I would be saying. Besides “I want cheaper car insurance”. Like wtf is a premium, wtf does 100/300/100 mean, how much insurance do i need???

Picked up my insulin prescriptions today. Thank fuck for Medicaid:

Your insurance saved you $384.79 - a month’s worth of long-acting insulin

Your insurance saved you $319.99 - a month’s worth of short-acting insulin

That’s over $700 per month for a life-saving, absolutely mandatory medication, to treat a disease that is considered random - as in, you don’t “cause” your type 1 diabetes. You didn’t eat too much sugar, your parents didn’t bone the wrong person, you’re just unlucky.

There is no other treatment for this disease than insulin, and off insurance, which our government is currently trying to destroy, it would cost seven hundred dollars to survive it for a month. And that’s just insulin - that doesn’t take into account syringes or test strips, or insulin pump supplies like infusion kits, or the “optional” things you’re really supposed to have like alcohol wipes and sharps containers.

I also picked up a Glucagon kit, which is an emergency sugar injection kit for when your blood sugar is so low you literally cannot function. Without insurance, it would have been $442.99.

This is absolutely horrifying, and so many people don’t understand what it would take for a diabetic to stay alive. Our current capitalistic health system is untenable, and if it gets any worse, so many people are going to die.

Paul Ryan either doesn’t understand insurance, or he’s lying about it.

As we struggle to understand the so-called Republican “health care” plan, which seems to have little to do either with health or care, it may be useful to review the underlying concept of that thing called “insurance,” which many in the GOP, particularly Paul Ryan, seem to have trouble understanding.

Among people with a basic high school education, it’s common knowledge that English civilization began expanding dramatically into the Americas in the mid-1600s. There are of course many explanations for this; among Christians, a favorite is the notion that colonists came to America to escape religious persecution. There’s some mild truth in that, if the only colonists you’re concerned about are the pilgrims at Plymouth Rock, but the greater truth is, most colonists and the companies that financed their colonies established themselves in America for one reason– to make money.

Trade was the reason for developing and expanding the American colonies; shipping was the method by which trade was made possible; and insurance was what made England’s shipping trade profitable, turning a small island into a great ship-building empire that within a hundred years had colonies and dominions across three quarters of the globe.

The key to all of this, the reason America exists, the reason there was a British Empire, was insurance. Specifically, the concept of shared risk, in which the costs of individual disaster could be spread among many, for the benefit of all.

Ever hear of Lloyd’s of London? It’s the world’s oldest insurance underwriter, and in a real sense, it’s the reason Britain ruled the waves.

Before the mid-1600s, mounting a colonial expedition to the New World was so risky a proposition that only governments could afford to do it. Spain, of course, had a New World colonial empire a hundred years before England did– but despite the benefits in gold and precious metals, in many ways the colonial experience was a drain on the Spanish Empire, an extractive enterprise with all the diminishing returns of every extractive enterprise. (In the long run, extracting resources from a colony ends up costing more than the value received, which is one reason the South American colonies were eventually abandoned by the Spanish and Portuguese, or left to flounder under disengaged administration.) In the mid-1600s, in England (and more or less simultaneously in the Netherlands) that reality began to change.

Thanks to insurance.

In a coffee house in London, owned by a man named Lloyd, a group of wealthy merchants came together to pool their resources in a mutual insurance fund. The situation was simple: an almost-predictable number of colonial expeditions were certain to fail, and an almost-predictable number of ships were going to be lost at sea in any given period of time. The problem was, despite all of a merchant’s best efforts, there was no way to know which expedition and which ships would fail or be lost. Any merchant who financed a ship was as likely (or unlikely) to lose his investment as any other merchant. You couldn’t know in advance, which meant there was no way to mitigate the risk of your investment by yourself. Potentially your entire livelihood was in danger on a single roll of the dice. Only a madman would take such a risk (which is why most early colonial expeditions were led by madmen or religious cults).

However… if a group of merchants, each with his own expedition or his own ship, could be persuaded to pool their individual risk exposure, and to share the risk, what was potential financial suicide for an individual would become a reasonable loss spread across a group of individuals.

Shared risk made individual investment and national expansion possible.

Insurance empowered trade; trade created profits; profits created wealth; wealth created opportunity for individuals and the nation alike; individuals flourished and the nation became an Empire.

True, rational conservatives know this. Insurance– that is, shared risk across a group to protect the individual against predictable dangers– is a fundamental building block in business and finance. The Republican party, supposedly the party of responsible business, knows that insurance is a vital component in business, and, by extension, in life as a whole.

So why do they lie about it? Why would Paul Ryan, in his defense of the indefensible Trumpcare anti-insurance bill presently before Congress, describe the basic premise of insurance as “the fatal conceit of Obamacare”?

This is what Paul Ryan said:

“The fatal conceit of Obamacare is that we’re just going to make everybody buy our health insurance at the federal level, young and healthy people are going to go into the market and pay for older, sicker people. So the young healthy person’s going to be made to buy health care, and they’re going to pay for the person, you know, who gets breast cancer in her 40s, or who gets heart disease in his 50s … The people who are healthy pay for the people who are sick. It’s not working, and that’s why it’s in a death spiral.”

Paul Ryan, the supposed policy expert who supposedly understands economics and business, is describing the basic premise of insurance– insurance, which made possible the world we currently live in– as a “fatal conceit.”

Either Paul Ryan is an idiot who doesn’t know what he’s talking about, doesn’t understand Business 101, doesn’t know even high school economic theory– or he’s a mendacious liar playing to the ignorance, greed, and prejudice of the Republican base.

My bet’s on the later.

Shared risk is the basis of business investment; it’s at the root of every modern economy; it is the DEFINITION of society.

Universal health insurance isn’t an imposition on individual freedom: it’s a guarantee of individual freedom, a recognition that what might destroy us as individuals can be borne easily by all of us as a group. It empowers the individual to take risks he or she would otherwise never consider. It strengths the group by sharing a common burden.

It makes nations into Empires.

Suspect: Part 2

Pairing: Reader x Bucky (not yet)
Word Count: 1.8K
Warnings: Swearing

A/N: Still set during CA:TWS. I’m actually super proud of my writing here

Feedback is always appreciated. Let me know if you want to be added to the tags list.

Part 1

A pulsating headache had been bugging you the last few hours, and you couldn’t be more happy that the clock had finally hit 5pm. Closing down your laptop, you start gathering your belongings and stuffing them into your bag. Grabbing your phone, you let out an annoyed sigh as it starts glitching.

“Great,” you sarcastically mumble to yourself as you grab your coat and bag,

“What is?” Dale’s voice sounds from beside you,

“My phone,” you sigh out, “It’s fucking up. Now I’m going to have to go by the Apple Store on my way home,”

Dale gives you a look of pity, “Well, not to be the barer of more bad news, but you can’t rush off yet, Chief wants us in the conference room. Emergency meeting,”

“What about?” you ask as your brows furrow.

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Statement from President Barack Obama on the 7th Anniversary of the Affordable Care Act

When I took office, millions of Americans were locked out of our health care system.  So, just as leaders in both parties had tried to do since the days of Teddy Roosevelt, we took up the cause of health reform.  It was a long battle, carried out in Congressional hearings and in the public square for more than a year.  But ultimately, after a century of talk, decades of trying, and a year of bipartisan debate, our generation was the one that succeeded.  We finally declared that in America, health care is not a privilege for a few, but a right for everybody.

The result was the Affordable Care Act, which I signed into law seven years ago today.  Thanks to this law, more than twenty million Americans have gained the security and peace of mind of health insurance.  Thanks to this law, more than ninety percent of Americans are insured – the highest rate in our history.  Thanks to this law, the days when women could be charged more than men and Americans with pre-existing conditions could be denied coverage altogether are relics of the past.  Seniors have bigger discounts on their prescription drugs.  Young people can stay on their parents’ plans until they turn 26 years old.  And Americans who already had insurance received an upgrade as well – from free preventive care, like mammograms and vaccines, to improvements in the quality of care in hospitals that has averted nearly 100,000 deaths so far.

All of that is thanks to the Affordable Care Act.  And all the while, since the law passed, the pace of health care inflation has slowed dramatically.  Prices are still rising, just as they have every year for decades – but under this law, they’ve been rising at the slowest rate in fifty years.  Families who get coverage through their employer are paying, on average, thousands of dollars less per year than if costs kept rising as fast as they were before the law.  And reality continues to discredit the false claim that this law is in a “death spiral,” because while it’s true that some premiums have risen, the vast majority of Marketplace enrollees have experienced no average premium hike at all.  And so long as the law is properly administered, this market will remain stable.  Likewise, this law is no “job-killer,” because America’s businesses went on a record-breaking streak of job growth in the seven years since I signed it.

So the reality is clear:  America is stronger because of the Affordable Care Act.  There will always be work to do to reduce costs, stabilize markets, improve quality, and help the millions of Americans who remain uninsured in states that have so far refused to expand Medicaid.  I’ve always said we should build on this law, just as Americans of both parties worked to improve Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid over the years.  So if Republicans are serious about lowering costs while expanding coverage to those who need it, and if they’re prepared to work with Democrats and objective evaluators in finding solutions that accomplish those goals – that’s something we all should welcome.  But we should start from the baseline that any changes will make our health care system better, not worse for hardworking Americans.  That should always be our priority.

The Affordable Care Act is law only because millions of Americans mobilized, and organized, and decided that this fight was about more than health care – it was about the character of our country.  It was about whether the wealthiest nation on Earth would make sure that neither illness nor twist of fate would rob us of everything we’ve worked so hard to build.  It was about whether we look out for one another, as neighbors, and fellow citizens, who care about each other’s success.  This fight is still about all that today.  And Americans who love their country still have the power to change it.

anonymous asked:

I just read about what's going on with sixpence and just what the hell. There are actually FREE services on the internet where you can chat with a PROFESSIONAL. They too aren't anything compared to real therapy, but they can help if someone feels down. Probably more like some sort of helpline, but with chats. And this person wants to charge people for a few emails? Nah, thanks. I think I'll stick with my professional therapy that I get for free thanks to insurances.

combined with their long-running history of plagiarism and ableism, all on a blog and with merch they monetize with STOLEN CONTENT from creators who are often from completely different websites, i don’t trust 6p in the slightest.

everything they’ve done shows they only want to profit off of vulnerable people and exploit society’s treatment of mental illness.

like, holy shit, as someone who aspires to get into counseling and other social work as a career, i’m disgusted by their lack of tact and respect, and eagerness to goad vulnerable people into giving them money for dubious “help”.

if they were to be running an official, licensed, private practice, i would STILL be distrusting of 6p as there are entire laws and sheets of paperwork that need to be arranged to ensure the safety of the client’s personal information and a breakdown of what 6p’s involvement with them would be as well as their credentials. Also the whole “taking advantage of depressed/mentally ill teens and independent creators for cash” sours things forever imo.

Hope this isn’t selfish to ask, but I had a major car accident this weekend on one of the busiest highways in the world (the 401 in Toronto)…my entire car was totaled and I suffered from some soft tissue damage and sprained muscles…I’m thankful to be around for sure, but my mental health is pretty broken as well. I left work…

For those who believe in the universe, in anything…I sincerely ask for your good wishes and energy, thank you so much…those who comment and like/reblog my art just makes my day. My blog seems to be busy even though my production is a bit slow (due to work and health). The Big Bang is almost here and I’m looking forward to it…I’m looking forward to a lot. I have many things to be thankful for but my insurance is giving me trouble, I just wish for my rental and car to be covered. I don’t even care about the medical expenses. Please pray for me and keep me in your good thoughts.

Love,

Katsu

Here’s a smile for you all <3

Take care!

hi everyone

I’m Wade, I’m a nonbinary autistic guy and I’m on testosterone thanks to my parents insurance. I’ve been on it since February, and now I’m already getting a little facial hair! It’s very exciting.

However, I don’t have a binder, and I am not out yet at school. My plan was to grow out my facial hair over summer break so when class started again I could have a new identity of a sort and hopefully pass during school hours, since I didn’t think it would come in so fast. I’m a DD cup, so I can’t even really hide that by dressing a certain way.

I’m currently unemployed, and living with roommates. I get gas and food on 250 a month. I take odd jobs whenever I can, and with that income I can survive for the month. However, I can’t afford any extra expenses, like a binder that would fit me comfortably or shaving supplies. 

I would really appreciate it if you could consider donating to my paypal, buying me art supplies from my amazon wishlist, or buying something from my redbubble or etsy.

paypal: wadethethundergraham@gmail.com

amazon wishlist

redbubble

etsy

If you’re interested in art commissions, my art tumblr is here. I’ll be putting together a commission post over the next few days. 

Also, if you like the cases on my etsy but I don’t have your case type, please tell me! I would love to make you one with what you need.

If you can, please spread this! I would really appreciate it. my current goal is shaving supplies and a binder.

Update

The fallout from the burglary is settling and all I can say is thank god for renter’s insurance, and thank you dad for hooking me up with said insurance and insisting that no, but -really-, you’ll thank me later. This is me thanking you later, after two calamities that would have wrecked our shit utterly if we hadn’t been covered. 

And everyone who amazingly, immediately, and with saint-like grace, offered to chip in and help me buy back the stuff that got stolen, I can’t even 

I cannot even. Just, thank you. You made me feel so much less hopeless in the moment, and I am very happy to able to decline your generosity. The insurance payout should cover everything that was taken, and hopefully some of the inconvenience of having to replace it all. 

This could have been a lot worse. My computer, which is basically my whole life and livelihood and contains most of my human identity, was untouched. Ash and I were scared but unharmed. The apartment itself wasn’t damaged. I’m still kinda worried about the identity stuff, but we’ll deal with that as it comes. 

The biggest impact so far has just been the stress, and the lingering sense of discomfort that our home was invaded. I’m still wading through the legwork of getting all my info updated and cards and IDs replaced, and I will probably be canceling my plans to go to SakuraCon with Ash to help him man his booth in vendor’s ally. I don’t want to leave the house unguarded for the time being, I’m still missing some important bits of ID that I’d prefer not to leave home without, and frankly, between this and my shoulder injury, I’m down to my last spoons. God I’m tired. Grateful, but tired. 

What to do if Your Island Explodes

1. Don’t build island retreat out of dynamite next time, maybe

2. Be thankful your insurance covers “accidental island explosion”

3. Remember: Putting “on” switch for coffee maker next to “self destruct” switch for island not a good idea

4. Ask yourself — “Do I really need an island?”

5. Get a refund before guy who sold island to you finds out it blew up

anonymous asked:

you were in TWO car accidents??!!!! as a concerned mom friend, i am concerned

Yeaaaah I didn’t have the best of luck last semester haha. The first one I was rear ended, and since I drove a small Mini Cooper it got totaled. Then we got a Jetta and a month later someone ran a red light and t-boned me. Totaling the new car 😐 but thank god for insurance!

Saw a new GP and she insisted on prescribing vyvanse instead of a methylphenidate BC it’s less addictive and she “had a first month free coupon”, was told there is no generic and without insurance goodrx price is still 288$ lmaooo she would NOT be convinced to switch me to generic ritalin until I tried this for two months.. Jokes on me I get dropped from the insurance in two months so Let Us Praye….