thailand tsunami

THAILAND, Phuket : Thai students place candles on a sand sculpture during commemorations on the the tenth anniversary of the 2004 tsunami at Patong beach in Phuket province on December 26, 2014. In the morning of December 26, 2004 a 9.3-magnitude earthquake off Indonesia’s western coast generated a series of massive waves that killed more than 220,000 people across 14 countries as far apart as Indonesia, Sri Lanka and Somalia. AFP PHOTO/Pornchai KITTIWONGSAKUL

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13 moving photos commemorating the 10 year anniversary of the Indian ocean tsunami

Friday marked the 10th anniversary of the Indian Ocean tsunami, one of modern history’s worst natural disasters. The devastating Dec. 26, 2004, tsunami struck a dozen countries, killing 230,000 people. 

The tsunami eradicated entire coastal communities and decimated families the morning after Christmas, forcing survivors to wade through “a horror show of corpse-filled waters,” as the Associated Press described it.

THAILAND, PHANG NGA : A foreign tourist visits the Ban Nam Khem tsunami memorial park wall on the tenth anniversary of the 2004 tsunami in Phang-nga province on December 26, 2014. Prayer recitals and solemn visits to mass graves marked the start of mourning on December 26 across tsunami-hit nations for the 220,000 people who perished when giant waves decimated coastal areas of the Indian Ocean a decade ago. AFP PHOTO / Pornchai KITTIWONGSAKUL

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Stunning photos show what the scenes of the Indonesian tsunami look like 10 years later

On Dec. 26, 2004, a massive undersea earthquake struck off the coast of Indonesia, sparking a massive tsunami that killed 230,000 people in fourteen countries and inundating coastal towns with waves up to 100 feet high. The Indian Ocean tsunami is considered one of the deadliest natural disasters in recent history.

A decade later, photographers have returned to Indonesia, Thailand and other countries to rephotograph some of the iconic scenes from the aftermath of the disaster, capturing both the devastation wrought by tsunami and the rebuilding efforts since.

THAILAND, PHANG NGA : Thai children hold roses before releasing them into the sea near the Ban Nam Khem tsunami memorial park as the tenth anniversary of the 2004 tsunami is remembered in Phang-nga province on December 26, 2014. Prayer recitals and solemn visits to mass graves marked the start of mourning on December 26 across tsunami-hit nations for the 220,000 people who perished when giant waves decimated coastal areas of the Indian Ocean a decade ago. AFP PHOTO / Pornchai KITTIWONGSAKUL

The Impossible

First off, the movie is beautifully made and told in a way that wrenches your heart out in anticipation. If you don’t like movies to manipulate your feelings, don’t go see it. I like it when movie makers can successfully pull that off, so I’m glad that my mother took me to see this one. 

Secondly, the story of this family (and some other families from reviews and responses I’ve read online) is particularly amazing and deserves telling. They overcame all the odds from a terrible disaster and that is sure to give people hope.

The only thing that pissed me off as I was walking out of the theater was the white privilege running throughout the film. There was a picture after the film’s end on screen of the family that the story is based off and they were obviously not the white “Bennet” english family shown in the film, and further research shows that they are actually the “Belon” family from Spain, and are not so white after all.

Looking past that slight thing, I loved this movie.

Mum and I are watching The Impossible together and both researching about the Thailand tsunami, she just told me that on the morning it happened, elephants that were being used for rides all disobeyed their owners and ran inland, away from the direction the waves eventually hit. I nearly started crying I love them so much and they would have saved the tourists who were riding on their backs.