texas alamo

Hey tumblr so I need your help! My school always had one of those “Read Across America” maps with young adult novels or romances or whatever (evidently, I’m American) but I’ve never seen anything comparable for wlw. I’ve tried to rely on my memory and on other people’s recs but I’m only (exactly) halfway through. Any suggestions to fill in these missing states? I’ve tried to avoid stories that take place across multiple locations. Or offer more options for the ones I already have, the more the merrier.

Alabama : Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe by Fannie Flag

Alaska :

Arizona : The Bean Trees by Barbara Kingsolver

Arkansas :

California : Everything Leads to You by Nina LaCour, Honey Girl by Lisa Freeman, Frog Music by Emma Donoghue, The Necessary Hunger by Nina Revovyr, Under the Lights by Dahlia Adler, The Butch and the Beautiful by Kris Ripper, As La Vista Turns by Kris Ripper, Far From Home by Lorelie Brown, Take Me Home by Lorelie Brown,

Colorado : Marionette by T.B. Markinson, Sleight of Hand by Mark Henwick

Connecticut : Pages for You by Sylvia Brownrigg, Patience & Sarah by Isabel Miller

Delaware :

Florida : Breathing Underwater by Lu Vickers, Roller Girl by Vanessa North

Georgia : Georgia Peaches and Other Forbidden Fruit by Jaye Robin Brown, The Color Purple by Alice Walker, The Blue Place by Nicola Griffith

Hawaii : Razor Wire by Lauren Gallagher

Idaho : Ship It by Britta Lundin, Her Hometown Girl by Lorelie Brown

Illinois : Coffee Will Make You Black by April Sinclair

Indiana : Tessa Masterson Will Go to Prom by Emily Franklin and Brendan Halpin

Iowa : A Thousand Acres by Jane Smiley, Moo by Jane Smiley

Kansas : Far From Xanadu by Julie Anne Peters

Kentucky : Run by Kody Keplinger

Louisiana : Her Name in the Sky by Kelly Quindlen

Maine : Style by Chelsea Cameron

Maryland : Every Day by David Levithan

Massachusetts : Mermaid in Chelsea Creek by Michelle Tea, Map of Ireland by Stephanie Grant

Michigan : The Liberators of Willow Run by Marianne K. Martin, The Virgin Suicides by Jeffrey Eugenides

Minnesota : Sister Mischief by Laura Goode, My Year Zero by Rachel Gold, Bend by Nancy Hedin

Mississippi : Ramona Blue by Julie Murphy

Missouri : Deliver Us from Evie by M.E. Kerr

Montana : The Miseducation of Cameron Post by Emily M. Danforth

Nebraska : Not Otherwise Specified by Hannah Moskowitz, Over You by Amy Reed

Nevada : Not Your Sidekick by C.B. Lee

New Hampshire : 

New Jersey : The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Díaz

New Mexico : Beauty of the Broken by Tawni Waters

New York : Labyrinth Lost by Zoraida Córdova, Annie On My Mind by Nancy Garden, Zami: A New Spelling of My Name by Audre Lorde, Rubyfruit Jungle by Rita Mae Brown, We Are Okay by Nina LaCour, Stone Butch Blues by Leslie Feinberg, Thaw by Elyse Springer, Heat Wave by Elyse Springer

North Carolina :

North Dakota : The Murdered Family by Vernon Keel

Ohio : Fat Angie by E.E. Charlton-Trujillo

Oklahoma : Ready Player One by Ernest Cline

Oregon : Juliet Takes a Breath by Gabby Rivera, Forgive Me If I’ve Told You This Before by Karelia Stetz-Waters

Pennsylvania : Fun Home by Alison Bechdel, Rubyfruit Jungle by Rita Mae Brown

Rhode Island : The Red Tree by Caitlín R. Kiernan

South Carolina :

South Dakota :

Tennessee : Secret City by Julia Watts, If I Was Your Girl by Meredith Russo 

Texas : Forgetting the Alamo, Or, Blood Memory by Emma Pérez, Santa Olivia by Jacqueline Carey

Utah : Saving Alex by Alex Cooper

Vermont :

Virginia : As I Descended by Robin Talley, Lies We Tell Ourselves by Robin Talley, Jericho by Ann McMan

Washington : The Edge of Nowhere by Elizabeth George, Dreadnought by April Daniels, About A Girl by Sarah McCarry, Karen Memory by Elizabeth Bear, Stuck Landing by Lauren Gallagher

West Virginia :

Wisconsin :

Wyoming :

Texas Gothic

- “Remember the Alamo,” people say. They glance toward the horizon with fear in their eyes and plan their yearly pilgrimage to San Antonio.  The Alamo does not like to be forgotten.

- The lake is not natural. It was built as a reservoir, everyone says, but when you go out on your cousin’s boat, you always see strange movements in your wake. In summer, when the water level drops low and lower still, bare branches reach from below the surface, strangely twisted and contorted. The lake lodges close down. Your cousin puts his boat in storage. No one mentions that there are more branches this summer than last. No one mentions how they move even when there’s no wind.

- Each winter, the Northerners come, driving in by the dozens from Michigan and New York and Oregon, even Canada. “We’re getting too old to brave the snow,” they tell you. “It’s so warm here! Such balmy weather. You must love living here year ‘round.” They look somehow thinner than they were when they arrived, eyes fever-bright and fingers twitching nervously. “Such nice weather,” they whisper. “So warm.”

- “Everybody’s somebody in Luckenbach,” proclaims a T-shirt in the back of your closet. You have never been to Luckenbach, and neither has anyone you know. The shirt hangs there as a reminder: someday Luckenbach will call to you, and you will not be able to resist.

- It is fifty degrees out and everyone you pass in the street is in heavy winter gear, as though their skin feels a chill that the thermometer doesn’t register. 

-  In the night, you hear gunshots. “It’s okay,” your mother says. “Just dove hunters.” You  know it’s not dove season, but you go back to bed anyway. It’s better than thinking of alternative reasons for the gunfire.

- After a day of excruciating heat, the skies open and rain pours down. At first, you’re delighted, but as the rain goes on and on, you start calling family members to make sure they’re on high ground. The rivers rise and flow over the roads, dividing the town into a series of islands, and still it rains. There’s a dip in the road at the entrance to your neighborhood, and it fills with water. You count your canned foods and check the weather-proofing on your doors and windows. It is still raining. You no longer remember what dry ground looks like.

- You pass a recent roadkill on the highway. In the split-second glimpse you get of it, it seems too big for a deer. There are too many limbs. A high-pitched ringing starts up in your ears and you quickly look away. When you drive past the spot again later that day, there’s nothing there.

- “Texas-sized,” says the 64-ounce cup you bought at the gas station. “Texas-sized,” brags the diner about its burgers. “Texas-sized,” whispers your neighbor, pointing out the tracks in your lawn. They look like coyote tracks, but they’re ten inches across.


March 6, 1836 -  The 13-day Mexican siege of the Alamo ended.  The siege, led by General Antonio López de Santa Anna, ended when all remaining defenders were killed.  The Mexican army of three thousand men defeated the 189 Texas volunteers. The Mexican losses exceeded 600.

PHOTO CREDIT: Richard Nowitz courtesy San Antonio Convention and Visitors Bureau. Received 07/14/11

Why the TV show Timeless Deserves More Attention

Okay everyone listen up. This past year (meaning 2016 going into 2017), NBC seemed to have a good batch of new TV shows that have gained critical acclaim (This Is Us, I’m looking at you). But one that seemed to fly under the radar was the show Timeless. It was created by Eric Kripke, who is also known for creating the show of Supernatural which is on the CW, and Shawn Ryan.  

Now just a gist of what it’s about. It’s about a man who steals a time machine to go back into critical points of United States and early North American history to try and take out this organization called Rittenhouse, which seems to play a major role in basically every turning point of the historical timeline. The government takes over control of the industry who made the time machine and gets a trio of people to go back in time to stop the man. 

It seems that time machines and time travel seem to be an up and coming theme in media (Doctor Who reboot, Legends of Tomorrow to name two). But this one I found stood out in ways that deserve the recognition it’s due. 

Keep reading

On this day, April 21 in 1836, REMEMBER THE ALAMO - The Battle of San Jacinto, was fought in present-day Harris County, Texas. It was the decisive battle of the Texas Revolution. Led by General Sam Houston, the Texian Army engaged and defeated General Antonio López de Santa Anna’s Mexican army in a fight that lasted just 18 minutes.

Santa Anna, the President of Mexico, was captured and surrendered the following day and held as a prisoner of war. Three weeks later, he signed the peace treaty that dictated that the Mexican army leave the region, paving the way for the Republic of Texas to become an independent country.

Someone just messaged me about getting into derby and here was my response.

Ooh yess. I actually tried out for my first league when I was 17 and here’s what I wish someone had told me.

Derby is expensive both in money and time. Between skates, gear, and dues. Expect to pay quite a bit at first, and always buy the better gear even if it’s a bit pricey. It’ll pay off in the long run. Don’t cheap out you only have one body. Keep it safe.

When skating alway always wear some form of padding. I generally at the least go with knee pads and wrist guards.

Wear a damn mouth guard. Not for your teeth but to prevent concussions. Well for your teeth too.

As for actual skating. Never compare yourself to others as hard as that will be. You’ll never be the best blocker, jammer, backward skater, blah blah blah. Just do your best. Skating comes more naturally to some and some girls take years to work up to even making a team let alone a travel or competing team. If your league has that.

Always give your all. Even on days when you don’t want to go to practice. Go. You will feel better. No matter the root of wanting to stay home.

Find an experienced skater and watch them. At practices and games. Maybe change each time. Look at their stance, control, the skills they’re good at. Ask them for help. Always ask. If you don’t know ask. If you’re unsure ask. If you think you’re good ask for tips to be better. Everyone can improve even the girls you think are he best.

Never feel down on yourself. So you fell. If you fall you’re learning and pushing your limits. I fall all the time trying new shit and seeing how far I can push myself. So you had a bad practice. You showed up. You were there and you learned from it. People will notice your effort and attendance more than you falling or failing. Always ask if you can help out. Do merch at the bouts. Lay track. Set up cones for drills. Be eager. And listen to what people tell you.

Make friends in your league. Go out of your way to talk to people even if you have social anxiety like me. It will make you more confident and people are generally always nice and willing to help.

There will be bitches. There will be girls you don’t get along with or who for some reason or another don’t like you. Don’t play into it. Do you and stay out of the drama. Always be nice and courteous. People will notice if you come in with an attitude or act like an asshole. They will also notice if you’re friendly and make an effort. First rule of derby is Don’t be a Dick. Take note of that. Always remember it. People will remember if you’re a douche. Also don’t get shitfaced especially if you’re underage. People remember that too. On that note never drink or take drugs while you’re skating as much fun as it is. It’s super dangerous and no one wants to be that girl who broke her ankle drunk skating.

All in all. Enjoy it. Derby will be one of the hardest, most challenging, most rewarding things you will ever do in your life. Savor every moment. Even the hard ones.

If you don’t make it in your first try out, don’t take it to heart but rather let it fuel you. Work out outside of derby. Skate everywhere. Skate at parks, rinks, and wear your skates at home it will help so much. If you can dodge a child at the open skate you can dodge a block from a giant blocker. If you can shut the car door with your ass you can block that super fast jammer.

General skating tips.
Always move your feet. Work on your footwork more than anything else. It will pay off. Look behind you. Derby happens in the back even if you’re at the back of the pack. Track awareness is key and your eyes should always be moving. Always know where both jammers are or you’ll have no idea what’s happening. Watch ore recorded bouts. The better the teams the better you’ll learn. Know the fucking rules. Study your ruleset front to back. When you think you know it. Read it again. Read it on the bus. Read it between classes. Read it when you’re bored and watching Netflix. It will pay off. Always get low. Think you’re low? Squat lower. It’s harder to hit and easier to take a hit. You’ll feel more stable on your skates. Think you’re gonna fall? Do a deep squat. You will probably recover. If you do fall get up quickly without your hands if you can. Always tuck your fingers. They will be rolled over, caught in the rail, or broke. If you don’t. Always find a buddy. Derby is about walls. If you’re alone and you’re not a jammer out of the pack you shouldn’t be alone. You’re not helping anyone. As a blocker find someone and wall up. Two blockers are generally a ton more effective than one. As a jammer look for your walls they will help you. They are your friends and you love them for it, but don’t rely on them.

I know that was a ton but I love derby and these are some of what I’ve learned skating with three leagues and trying out for four.

Lastly Skate Hard. Skate Fast. Turn Left. Hit a Bitch.

50 States Most Haunted

Each state in the USA has it’s own tales of haunted hotels, houses, and various other places. But each state has what is considered their “most haunted” spot. What is your state’s most haunted place?

1. Alabama - Sloss Furnaces (Birmingham)
2. Alaska - UAA’s Wendy Williamson Auditorium (Anchorage)
3. Arizona - Bird Cage Theater (Tombstone)
4. Arkansas - The Crescent Hotel (Eureka Springs)
5. California - Alcatraz Island (San Francisco)
6. Colorado - The Stanley Hotel (Estes Park)
7. Connecticut - Seaside Sanatorium (Waterford)
8. Delaware - Fort Delaware (Pea Patch Island)
9. Florida - Florida Theatre (Jacksonville)
10. Georgia - Kennesaw House (Marietta)
11. Hawaii - ‘lolani Place (Honolulu)
12. Idaho - Old Idaho State Penitentiary (Boise)
13.  Illinois - Congress Plaza Hotel (Chicago)
14. Indiana - French Lick Springs Hotel (French Lick)
15. Iowa - Villisca Ax Murder House (Villisca)
16. Kansas - The Sallie House (Atchison)
17. Kentucky - Waverly Hills Sanatorium (Louisville)
18. Louisiana - The Myrtles Plantation (St. Francisville)
19. Maine - Wood Island Lighthouse (Wood Island)
20. Maryland - Antietam Battlefield (Sharpsburg)
21. Massachusetts - The Lizzie Borden House (Fall River)
22. Michigan - Henderson Castle (Kalamazoo)
23. Minnesota - Forepaugh’s Restaurant (St. Paul)
24. Mississippi - Cedar Grove Mansion (Vicksburg)
25. Missouri - Lemp Mansion (St. Louis)
26. Montana - The University of Montana (Missoula)
27. Nebraska - Nebraska State Capitol (Lincoln)
28. Nevada - Virginia City
29. New Hampshire - Pine Hill Cemetery (Hollis)
30. New Jersey - Seabrook-Wilson House (Port Monmouth)
31. New Mexico - Highway 666
32. New York - The Amityville Horror House (Amityville)
33. North Carolina - Brown Mountain Lights (Burke and Caldwell Counties)
34. North Dakota - Liberty Memorial Building (Bismarck)
35. Ohio - The Ridges (Athens)
36. Oklahoma - Skirvin Hotel (Oklahoma City)
37. Oregon - McMenamin’s White Eagle Saloon (Portland)
38. Pennsylvania - Gettysburg Battlefields (Gettysburg)
39. Rhode Island - The Ladd School (Exeter)
40. South Carolina - Old Charleston Jail (Charleston)
41. South Dakota - Bullock Hotel (Deadwood)
42. Tennessee - Loretta Lynn Plantation House (Hurricane Mills)
43. Texas - The Alamo (San Antonio)
44. Utah - Westminster College (Salt Lake City)
45. Vermont - The University of Vermont (Burlington)
46. Virginia - Ferry Plantation House (Virginia Beach)
47. Washington - The Palace Hotel (Port Townshend)
48. West Virginia - West Virginia State Penitentiary (Moundsville)
49. Wisconsin - Summerwind Mansion (West Bay Lake)
50. Wyoming - Wyoming Frontier Prison (Rawlins)

2

February 23rd 1836: Battle of the Alamo begins

On this day in 1836, the Battle of the Alamo began between Texan and Mexican soldiers, near the modern city of San Antonio. The Alamo was a former mission founded by Spanish settlers, which, by the nineteenth century, had become a fort for Spanish troops. In the 1820s, Mexico fought a successul war for independence from Spain, which led to increased migration of American citizens into the Mexican province of Texas. As the American population in the area grew, a revolutionary movement gained traction. War eventually broke out in 1835, and early on, Texan volunteer soldiers successfully captured the Alamo garrison from Mexican troops, and with it gained control of San Antonio. While Texas’ commander-in-chief, Sam Houston, was apathetic about keeping the fort, its defenders - including Colonel James Bowie, Lieutenant Colonel William Travis, and famed frontiersman Davy Crockett - insisted on defending the Alamo. Only around 200 soldiers defended the fort, and on February 23rd 1836 were besieged by a formidable Mexican army, numbering thousands of troops, led by General Antonio López de Santa Anna. Despite overwhelming odds, the Texans managed to repel the attack for 13 days, before being overpowered on March 6th, when most of the defenders were killed. Mexican forces thus regained control of the Alamo fort, but Texans rallied around the incident as a symbol of their resistance against Mexican oppression; “Remember the Alamo!” became a popular war cry. In April, Houston’s army - buoyed by new recruits inspired by the Alamo - defeated the Mexicans at San Jacinto, and Texan independence was secured. The Republic of Texas was short-lived, as Texas was annexed as the 28th state of the United States in 1845. The annexation enflamed sectional tensions, as it raised the question of whether the new state would be slave or free. The action also exacerbated underlying tensions between America and Mexico - as Mexico did not recognise Texas’ independence - and led to war in 1846. The Alamo remains a powerful symbolic moment in Texan and American history, having been immortalised in numerous works of fiction; the site of the battle attracts over 2.5 million visitors a year.