teutonic

‘1410′
My new painting commemorating the Battle of Grunwald, where the combined forces of Polish and Lithuanian knights, crushed the power of the Teutonic Order. It was the largest battle of the Middle Ages.
If you know who is this character in the foreground … then you know that the big guy at the back has a serious problems :) Cheers!

7

Malbork Castle, Poland 


aka THE LARGEST CASTLE IN THE WORLD 

what really struck me about this place were the pictures of its desolation as a result of WWII. over half of the castle was destroyed, and then completely rebuilt, brick by brick, and finished in April this year. i saw this kind of thing in medellin too, where the city had deliberately targeted the most dangerous and impoverished neighbourhoods, and created sculpture parks as a symbol of hope and progress. v inspiring

List of gender neutral names with meanings and origins:

So, I was going to send this as a message to @oabuckvu, but instead I thought I’d post this here since others may also find it helpful!

A:

Addison- child of Adam- English
Adina- slender- Hebrew
Alby- from Alba- Latin
Ally- friend- English
Ash- ash tree clearing- English
Azra- pure- Israeli
Asa- physician- Hebrew
Arin- enlightened- Hebrew
Arlo- army, hill- old English or barberry tree- Spanish
Avery- elf ruler- English
Alex- defender of mankind- Greek
Arlen- promise, oath- Irish
Ambrose- immortal- Latin
Aspen- tree- English
August- dignity, vulnerable- German

B:

Blaine- yellow- Scottish
Blake- blonde, dark- English
Bryce- swift- Celtic
Brooklyn- broken land- English
Bradley- clearing in a woods- English
Bailey- bailiff- English
Beck- brook, stream- Norse

C:

Chyler- beloved- English
Cody- child of cuidightheach- English
Charlie- charles- English
Chris- christ- English
Coby- supplanter- Latin
Casey- brave- Gaelic
Corin- spear bearer- Irish
Cameron- crooked nose- Scottish
Colby- town, dark- Norse

D:

Dakota- friend- Native American
Devon- poet- Irish
Delaney- descendent of the challenger- Irish
Drew- manly- English
Denham- habitation- English
Dael- knowledge of God- Hebrew
Danny- God has judged- Scottish

E:

Ellis- Jehova is God- Greek
Ellery- from the elder tree island- English
Evan- youth warrior- Irish
Emery- brave, powerful- German
Eden- delight- Hebrew
Ellison- child of elder- English

F:

Farron- iron grey- Anglo Saxon
Freddie- peaceful ruler- German
Frankie- free one- French
Fynn- river in Ghana- African
Finch- bird- English
Flynn- child of red hair- Irish

G:

Gene- well born- English
Gale- cheerful, pleasant- English
Glade- shining- English
Glen- valley- Gaelic

H:

Hollis- Holly tree dweller- English
Harlow- rock, army, hill- English
Halley- lived near a grove- English
Hadley- Heather field- English

I:

Isa- devoted to God- Teutonic
Ives- archers bow- English
Iggy- firey one- English

J:

Juniper- youth producing, evergreen- Latin
Jesse- gift- Hebrew
Jo- God is gracious- English/German/French
Joey- may Jehova add- Hebrew
Jordan- river flow- Macedonian
Jet- black gemstone- German

K:

Kellam- at the ridges- Norse
Kelsey- from the ships island- English
Kendall- royal valley- English
Kai- sea- Hawaii

L:

Logan- hollow- Scottish
Leslie- garden of holly- Scottish
Lee- dweller near the wood- English
Lane- path- English
Luca- bringer of light- Italy
Lirit- poetic- Hebrew
Lex- defender- Greek
Lakota- friends- Siouan

M:

Mattie- strength in battle- German
Morgan- sea defender- English
Misha- God live- Russia
Max- greatest- Latin
Mattise- gift of god- French
Monroe- from the mouth of the river Roe- Irish

N:

Newlyn- from the new spring- Celtic
Noel- Christmas- French
Nicky- victory- English
Nat- gift of god- English
Nova- chases butterfly- Native American

O:

Oakley- from the oak tree meadow- English
Oak- tree- English

P:

Perry- dwells by the pear tree- English
Piper- one who plays the pipe- Scandinavian
Pema- lotus- Tibetan
Puck- unknown meaning- Dutch
Parker- park keeper- English

Q:

Quinn- fifth- Irish
Quinta- fifth- Spanish

R:

Reese- firey- Welsh
Rey- king- Spanish
Reed- red, clearing- English
Rune- secret- Norse
Rue- herb, regret- English
Rain- blessings- American
Riley- dweller by the Rye field- English
River- river- English
Rowan- red- Gaelic
Rory- red king- Gaelic
Ronson- child of ron- English

S:

Sawyer- cuts timber- Celtic
Stevie- crown- English
Shiloh- owner- Hebrew
Sage- wise one- French
Saxon- knife- Teutonic
Sammy- bright sun- Finnish
Scout- to listen- French
Shane- gift from God- Irish

T:

Tex- texas- American
Toni- worthy of praise- Latin
Theo- God given- Greek
Taylor- to cut- French
Tyne- a river in england- English
Tyler- maker of tiles- English
Terry- powerful ruler- English

U:

Umber- shade- French

W:

Wyatt- guide- English
Willow- graceful- English
Wynne- fair- English
Wren- song bird- English

X:

Xen- religious- Japanese

Y:

Yael- mountain goat- Hebrew

Z:

Zen- meditative state- Japanese

When Christian missionaries asked the north Teutons who or what they believed in, they received the reply which centuries previously the south Teutons who had believed in das Gott (neuter) might also have given that they believed in their power (matt) or strength (magin), a power working within them, a deity filling the religious man, an inner-worldly and inner-spiritual deity. Such an answer must have seemed to the missionaries, as it would to many present-day commentators, a mere boast of power or an idolatrous presumption, while in fact it must be understood as a factual ”The God” (Das Gott) corresponding to the dominans ille in nobis deus. But it is easy to understand that the missionaries, who in Christianity had accepted the extra-mundane, transcendent ideas of a ”personal” God, from the Semitic peoples, were at a loss when confronted by faith in a destiny ruling within men.
—  Hans F. K. Günther, Religious Attitudes of the Indo-Europeans

The Wheel of the Year

The Wheel of the Year is an annual cycle of seasonal festivals, observed by many modern Pagans. It consists of either four or eight festivals: either the solstices and equinoxes, known as the “quarter days”, or the four midpoints between, known as the “cross quarter days”.

The festivals celebrated by differing sects of modern Paganism can vary considerably in name and date. Observing the cycle of the seasons has been important to many people, both ancient and modern, and many contemporary Pagan festivals are based to varying degrees on folk traditions.

In many traditions of modern Pagan cosmology, all things are considered to be cyclical, with time as a perpetual cycle of growth and retreat tied to the Sun’s annual death and rebirth.

Yule/Winter Solstice: a festival observed by the historical Germanic peoples, later undergoing Christian reformulation resulting in the now better-known Christmastide. A celebration the beginning of longer days, as this is the shortest day of the year in terms of sunlight. 

Imbolc: the first cross-quarter day following Midwinter this day falls on the first of February and traditionally marks the first stirrings of spring. It is time for purification and spring cleaning in anticipation of the year’s new life. 

For Celtic pagans, the festival is dedicated to the goddess Brigid, daughter of The Dagda and one of the Tuatha Dé Danann.

Among witches reclaiming tradition, this is the  time for pledges and dedications for the coming year.

Ostara/Spring Equinox: from this point on, days are longer than the nights. Many mythologies, regard this as the time of rebirth or return for vegetation gods and celebrate the spring equinox as a time of great fertility.

Germanic pagans dedicate the holiday to their fertility goddess, Ostara. She is notably associated with the symbols of the hare and egg. Her Teutonic name may be etymological ancestor of the words east and Easter.

Beltrane: traditionally the first day of summer in Ireland, in Rome the earliest celebrations appeared in pre-Christian times with the festival of Flora, the Roman goddess of flowers, and the Walpurgis Night celebrations of the Germanic countries. 

Since the Christianization of Europe, a more secular version of the festival has continued in Europe and America. In this form, it is well known for maypole dancing and the crowning of the Queen of the May.

Litha/Summer Solstice: one of the four solar holidays, and is considered the turning point at which summer reaches its height and the sun shines longest.

Luchnassad/Lammas: It is marked the holiday by baking a figure of the god in bread and eating it, to symbolize the sanctity and importance of the harvest. Celebrations vary, as not all Pagans are Wiccans.  

The name Lammas (contraction of loaf mass) implies it is an agrarian-based festival and feast of thanksgiving for grain and bread, which symbolizes the first fruits of the harvest. Christian festivals may incorporate elements from the Pagan Ritual.

Mabon/Autumn Equinox: a Pagan ritual of thanksgiving for the fruits of the earth and a recognition of the need to share them to secure the blessings of the Goddess and the God during the coming winter months. The name Mabon was coined by Aidan Kelly around 1970 as a reference to Mabon ap Modron, a character from Welsh mythology. Among the sabbats, it is the second of the three Pagan harvest festivals, preceded by Lammas / Lughnasadh and followed by Samhain.

Samhain: considered by some as a time to celebrate the lives of those who have passed on, and it often involves paying respect to ancestors, family members, elders of the faith, friends, pets, and other loved ones who have died. In some rituals the spirits of the departed are invited to attend the festivities. It is seen as a festival of darkness, which is balanced at the opposite point of the wheel by the festival of Beltane, which is celebrated as a festival of light and fertility.