terrorist attacks in new york city

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February 26th 1993: World Trade Center bombing

On this day in 1993, a truck bomb was detonated below the North Tower of the World Trade Center in New York City. The bomb was intended to knock the North Tower into the South Tower to destroy them both, but this did not occur. The attack still killed six people, including a pregnant woman, and injured over one thousand. The terrorist attack was planned by a group of conspirators and masterminded by Ramzi Yousef. In 1994, four men were convicted of carrying out the bombing and two more were convicted in 1997. The group were funded by Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, who would go on to be the principal co-ordinator behind the destruction of the Twin Towers on September 11th 2001. The memorial to the victims of the 1993 attack was destroyed on 9/11, but they are currently memorialised at the North Pool of the National 9/11 Memorial, opened in 2011.

“It felt like an airplane hit the building”
- eye-witness Bruce Pomper on the 1993 attack

Why Come From Away Deserves to Win the Tony for Best Musical

Jet fuel can’t melt steel beams. Bush did 9/11.

Right, got that off my chest. Anyway, are you tired of hearing the same accounts of 9/11? We all know the stories of worst terrorist attack in US history that, for the first time, closed the US airspace and forever marked a nation (and especially the city of New York) with the fear of terrorism, muslims, and anyone from the middle east. These stories are all too often one-sided and seldom bring anything new to the discussion, but Come From Away dares to change that. Come From Away tells the story of a small town in Newfoundland, Canada where 38 planes were forced to land after the attack on the Twin Towers. Here’s is why this touching, intimate musical deserves to get that spinny coin.

We’ll begin with the visuals. Ordinarily this is where I might talk about the set, but…well, Come From Away doesn’t have a set. The show relies on creative use of chairs rearranged throughout the show to represent everything from planes to a bar. The results are a sort of trunk show that allows the audience to fill in the spaces with fantastic success. The focus in this show is not about what you see, but about what you discover. This is where the casting is important. The show is full of people of color, including a gay couple, an African family, and a muslim from the middle east (which, as you can imagine leads to conflict in the story). This diversity lends to the most important message of the show, which is to slow down from life and learn how to see the people around you as just that, people. We may have differences, but we are all human, and to quote President Barack Obama, “Despite our differences, we all share the same title: Citizen.” (though, to be fair this story takes place over two nations so…)

The music is less of a series of songs and more of a shifting melody as we pass from chapter to chapter. This medley works splendidly for the show as contrasting sounds blend into one another from one moment into the next, each feeling like its trying to tell its own story just as the characters do. The show features primarily folk styled music but it relies on quite a bit of a capella and harmonization from the ensemble, leading to every number feeling strong and supported by the entire cast, especially Screech In and 28 Hours/Wherever We Are. Even with this though, the orchestrations are clever, novel, and brilliantly written. The stunning vocals of the individual cast, especially Jenn Colella, help drive the messages home to the audiences, so that soon you’re laughing, crying, afraid, and inspired right alongside the characters.

On that note, the writing for the show is very cute but . It’s hard to know whether this show is for adults, like you would expect from a show about 9/11, or more for families. Certainly the story is one with lessons for everyone. I think one character’s really stands out as representing the central messages of the show, a man who was born a Polish Jew during the outbreak of WWII. He talks about how he was raised to be afraid of telling anyone of his ethnicity/religion, but in seeing all of the stories coming out amidst the catastrophe, he had to tell someone about his past and he learns to embrace his differences. In staying in Gander against their wills, the come-from-aways learn more about themselves, and in providing for these strangers the Newfoundlanders in turn discover something in themselves. Most important of all though, the audience discovers something about themselves.

Come From Away is a different sort of 9/11 story, and you often forget it’s even centered around the twin towers at all. Ultimately it is a musical about all of us, trying to go about our lives without taking the time to listen to other people, and what happens when we are forced to do so. It is a touching story, one that made me cry repeatedly the first time I listened to it,  and I’m sure it will hold a very special place in my heart, and the hearts of many other people for many years. It’s even more special because the show is base don real events. Overall, Come From Away is a very special, heart-warming show that fully deserves to be recognized as the best musical this year.


Great Comet          Groundhog Day           Dear Evan Hansen

9/11 Memorial - New York City, USA

Encompassing 110,000 square feet of space, the 9/11 Memorial Museum was built to honor the victims of the terrorist attacks on both September 11, 2001 and February 26, 1993. The memorial cost $USD700 million to build, with funds being collected through both private and public donations. The museum presents 23,000 images, 10,300 artifacts, 500 hours of moving images and 1,970 oral histories. 

The Memorial’s twin reflecting pools are each nearly an acre in size and feature the largest manmade waterfalls in North America. The pools sit within the footprints where the Twin Towers once stood.

Police militarization would accelerate in the 2000s. The first half of the decade brought a new and lucrative source of funding and equipment: homeland security. In response to the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, on the World Trade Center in New York City and the Pentagram in Washington, the federal government opened a new spigot of funding in the name of fighting terror. Terrorism would also provide new excuses for police agencies across the country to build up their arsenals and for yet smaller towns to start up yet more SWAT teams. The second half of the decade also saw more mission creep for SWAT teams and more pronounced militarization even outside of drug policing. The 1990s trend of government officials using paramilitary tactics and heavy-handed force to make political statements or to make an example of certain classes of nonviolent offenders would continue, especially in response to political protests. The battle gear and aggressive policing would also start to move into more mundane crimes -SWAT teams have recently been used even for regulatory inspections.
—  Rise of the Warrior Cop: The Militarization of America’s Police Forces by Radley Balko
Buscemi Trivia

•Steven Vincent Buscemi was born December 13, 1957 in Brooklyn, NY
•His surname is pronounced “Buss-ehm-ee”. He is of Sicilian/Italian   ancestry on his father’s side, and has Irish, English, and Dutch ancestry on his mother’s side
• He pronounces his name as “Bu-semmy”, but the Italian pronunciation is “Bu-shehmy”. He once said about the pronunciation of his name “I had to go to Sicily to find out I pronounce my name wrong.”
• He is adamant about not altering his famously misaligned teeth, saying “I’ve had dentists who have wanted to help me out, but I say, You know, I won’t work again if you fix my teeth.”
• Was on the varsity wrestling team at Valley Stream Central High School, NY
• Went to a Catholic school
• Born on a Friday the 13th
• Modeled for H&M in 2000
• Auditioned for the part of George Costanza on “Seinfeld”
• During the 80’s in New York he performed original theater/comedy pieces with Mark Boone Junior
• Bears such a strong resemblance to writer-director John Waters that as a joke, Waters sent out cards with a photo of Buscemi made up to look like Waters
• His character in “Reservoir Dogs” refuses to tip waitresses. He later made a cameo as a waiter in “Pulp Fiction”
• Was a New York City Firefighter from 1980 to 1984, with Engine Company #55 in the Little Italy section of NY
• Showed up at his old firehouse the day after the World Trade Center tragedy in New York to volunteer. Worked twelve hour shifts for a week after the terrorist act, digging through rubble with his old comrades looking for missing firefighters… anonymously. [Sep 2001]
• Stabbed in the throat, head and arm during a barroom brawl at the Firebelly Lounge in Wilmington, North Carolina. The brawl also involved Vince Vaughn, who was arrested for brutalizing one of Buscemi’s attackers. He suffered a deep cut to the face and now has a noticeable scar on his cheek. Heavy make-up is used to hide it in movies. [12 Apr 2001]
• He went through a variety of interesting jobs before hitting it big as a character actor. He worked as a bartender, drove an ice-cream truck, was a firefighter, and attempted stand-up comedy “I did stand up. I loved George Carlin and Steve Martin”
• In addition to his acting work, he has gained praise as a director, “Trees Lounge”, “Animal Factory”, “Lonesome Jim”, “Interview” and several episodes of “The Sopranos”, “OZ”, and “Nurse Jackie”
• Quotes
• “When I get cast, I always flip to the end of the script to see if my character gets beaten up or killed.”
• “There’s a certain type of character that you can’t help but come in contact with growing up and living Brooklyn and Long Island. A certain mixture of moxie, heart and a wise guy sense of humor.”
• “I just like playing interesting, complex, complicated characters. I like films that also have an element of humor.”

• “I usually get freaked out if I’m in a situation where a lot of people recognize me at once”

Manchester and Concerts

I have seen many posts about the Manchester tragedy and how many people, young and older, are scared to attend their upcoming concerts and I just want to say one thing:

DONT LET TERRORISTS WIN. Terrorist mentality is to see an effect come from their actions. If they see they can scare us by attacking us at concerts, the threat will become stronger. It is similar to 9/11. Many were worried to be out and about New City.

But when New Years came around, all of New York came together in Times Square to show that they were strong and would continue to live despite these attacks.

Now I am not saying you shouldn’t be afraid. It is a scary thought that not even a concert can be a sort of safe place. What I am saying is TO KEEP LIVING. Continue doing what you love.

Living a life of fear results in missed opportunities and happiness. Dont let cowards who hide behind bombs take that away because our spirit are the only things we carry towards the end.

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World landmarks lit up to show solidarity with France, in honor of the victims of the Paris terrorist attacks of November 13, 2015. #prayforparis

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September 11th 2001: 9/11 Terror Attacks

On this day in 2001, thirteen years ago today, two hijacked planes were crashed into the World Trade Center towers in New York City and another into the Pentagon building in Virginia. The Twin Towers collapsed and part of the Pentagon was badly damaged. A fourth plane was intended to strike the US Capitol Building in Washington DC but its passengers seized control from the hijackers and crashed the plane into a field in Pennsylvania. Nearly 3,000 people died on this terrible day and thousands more injured in the attacks which sent shockwaves around the world. The attacks were planned and carried out by members of the terrorist group al-Qaeda, and masterminded by Osama bin Laden, who was since been found and killed by US forces. The aftermath of the tragedy prompted greater focus on national security both in the US and abroad and contributed to the invasions of, and subsequent wars in, Iraq and Afghanistan. Today, thirteen years on, we remember the thousands of people who lost their lives on 9/11.

“America is under attack”
- White House Chief of Staff Andrew Card telling President Bush about the attacks

anonymous asked:

Can you list the Whites that are going around bombing buildings, bombing trains, bombing marathons, and beheading people? Oh wait, that's diaperheads

Sure thing

List of Non-Muslim terrorist groups: 

  • Army of God
  • Aryan Nations
  • The Covenant, The Sword, and the Arm of the Lord
  • Earth Liberation Front
  • Jewish Defense League
  • Ku Klux Klan
  • May 19th Communist Organization
  • The Order
  • Phineas Priesthood
  • Symbionese Liberation Army
  • United Freedom Front
  • Weathermen

This is just in America.

Acts of terror by Non-Muslims:

  • Wall Street bombing in 1920 - 30 dead, 143 seriously injured 
  • Abortion clinic bombings during the 1990’s - In 1993, Michael F. Griffin shot Dr. David Gunn to death during a protest.
  • In 1994, Paul Jennings Hill shot Dr. John Britton and clinic escort James Barrett to death.
  • In 1998, James Kopp shot a number of abortion providers, killing one, Dr. Barnett Slepian.
  • Army of God - Eric Robert Rudolph bombed the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta in protest of abortion, killing one person and wounding 111, and bombed several abortion clinics in 1997 and 1998. He also bombed two abortion clinics and a gay and lesbian night club.
  • Aryan Nations (AN) - a white nationalist neo-Nazi organization founded in the 1970s by Richard Girnt Butler as an arm of the Christian Identity group known as the Church of Jesus Christ-Christian.
  • Oklahoma City bombing - killed 168 people on April 19, 1995 the deadliest act of terrorism in US history (before 9/11)
  • Wisconsin Sikh temple shooting On August 5, 2012, Wade Michael Page fatally shot six people and wounded four others in a mass shooting at a Sikh temple in Wisconsin. Page was an American white supremacist and United States Army veteran. All of the dead were members of the Sikh faith.
  • Southern California shootings - February 2013, Christopher Dorner killed three police officers and a basketball coach
  • JDL - On February 25, 1994, Baruch Goldstein, an American-born Israeli member of the JDL, opened fire on Muslims kneeling in prayer at the revered Cave of the Patriarchs mosque in the West Bank city of Hebron, killing 29 worshippers and injuring 125 
  • Approximately 60 out of 2,400 terrorist attacks in the U.S. were carried out by Muslims. That’s c.2.5% of all terrorist attacks on U.S. soil between 1970 and 2012 were carried out by Muslims.

School Shootings in America: 2000’s 

  • February 29, 2000, Flint, Michigan- At Buell Elementary School, 6-year-old Dedrick Owens, the youngest school shooter ever, shot and killed classmate Kayla Rolland
  • May 26, 2000, Lake Worth, Florida - 1 killed 
  • August 28, 2000, Fayetteville, Arkansas - 2 killed 
  • September 26, 2000, New Orleans, Louisiana
  • January 15, 2002, New York City - 17-year-old Vincent Rodriguez shot and wounded two students at Martin Luther King, Jr. High School in Manhattan, with a 380-caliber semi-automatic pistol
  • May 9, 2003, Cleveland, Ohio
  • September 24, 2003, Cold Spring, Minnesota - 2 killed 
  • February 9, 2004 East Greenbush, New York 
  • October 2004, Memphis, Tennessee aggravated battery with a firearm.
  • (There’s more btw)

2014 and 2015 

  • November 20, 2014, Tallahassee, Florida, Florida State University shooting
  • November 20, 2014, Miami, Florida
  • December 5, 2014 Claremore, Oklahoma
  • December 12, 2014, Portland, Oregon Rosemary Anderson High School shooting
  • January 15, 2015, Milwaukee, Wisconsin
  • January 20, 2015, Columbia, South Carolina
  • February 4, 2015 Frederick, Maryland
  • February 5, 2015, Columbia, South Carolina 

Majority of these are in America and committed by Non-Muslims. I hope this sorts your ignorant ass out. 

Edit: There was also the NAACP bombing in Jan ‘15 in Colorado, The Chapel Hill shootings, the Pensylvanina Mall shooting in Feb '15 and the Oregen school shootings in Dec '14. 

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March 20th 2003: The Iraq War begins

On this day in 2003, in the early hours of the morning, the United States, United Kingdom, and their allies began a military invasion of Iraq. The reasons for the invasion were the alleged presence of weapons of mass destruction, and Iraq’s supposed ties to terrorist group Al-Qaeda who perpetrated the 9/11 attacks on New York City in 2001. According to U.S. President George W. Bush and British Prime Minister Tony Blair the mission was “to disarm Iraq of weapons of mass destruction, to end Saddam Hussein’s support for terrorism, and to free the Iraqi people.” However, in 2005 it was discovered that Iraq had no weapons of mass destruction. On March 19th, an air strike hit the Presidential Palace in Baghdad, and the next day coalition forces began an invasion into Basra province. The forces drove into the country and occupied areas, eventually driving President Saddam Hussein into hiding. With Hussein gone and Iraq occupied, the end of combat was announced on 1st May, marking the transition from invasion to occupation. Hussein was captured in December 2003 and executed in December 2006. UK troops remained in Iraq until April 2009, while U.S. troops withdrew slowly. The occupation continued until December 15th 2011, when U.S. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta declared the Iraq War over.

A Muslim woman was attacked at a NYC subway stop — it was the third such attack in 1 week

  • 45-year-old Muslim woman Soha Salama was physically attacked at the Grand Central subway station in New York City on Monday morning.
  • The man started with verbal abuse. He reportedly called Salama a “terrorist” and said she shouldn’t be allowed to work in the city. 
  • He also told Salama, who has lived in NYC for 20 years, to “go back” to her country. 
  • The alleged attacker then followed Salama after she got off the train.
  • Shortly after, he pushed her down the exit staircase, causing injuries to her knee and ankle. 
  • Salama was reportedly taken to the hospital for her injuries. 
  • The NYPD is currently investigating the incident. Read more

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The Call to the Hall

Every player that steps onto A baseball field dreams of that moment.

They put in years of effort in the hope that they one day will be considered great. That they can take their place in baseball’s most prestigious hall. That their name and cap can sit among the best of all-time.

For Michael Joseph Piazza, that dream is now a reality.

The wait was long. Four years of missed chances, ballots casted and counted, to no avail. But in early January, with 83 percent of the vote, the wait was over. And on July 24, he was cemented as one of baseball’s best when he was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame.

His plaque will now be viewed by every baseball devotee that makes their way to Cooperstown and his legacy has been secured. A legacy that will not only mark him as one of the best offensive catchers to play the game, but also as one of the greatest Mets in franchise history, as he becomes only the second player to enter the Hall of Fame as a Met.

“What an amazing life that I’ve had in baseball,” Piazza said. “The memories, to me, I almost can’t capture. It’s truly a blessing and I’m very, very grateful.”

For Piazza it is the culmination of a career that began when he was drafted by the Los Angeles Dodgers in the 62nd round (1,390th pick) of the 1988 amateur draft. With his enshrinement into Cooperstown, Piazza is the lowest draft pick to ever reach enshrinement.

“That’s what’s wonderful about baseball,” Piazza said. “You just need a chance. I was able to sneak into this game, kind of limp in, if you will. Through a lot of hard work, some luck and some determination, I was able to build a pretty good career.”

He spent four full years in the minor leagues before getting his first big league call-up in 1992 with the Dodgers.

In 1993, Piazza’s first full season in the big leagues, he batted .318 (174-547) with 24 doubles, 35 home runs and 112 RBI en route to being named the National League Rookie of the Year, an All-Star and a Silver Slugger. He even finished ninth in the MVP voting that season.

It was the first of 12 All-Star Games for Piazza (he’d make seven of those 12 as a Met) and the first of 10 Silver Slugger awards, which is the most by a catcher. His consecutive run of Silver Sluggers from 1993-2002 are the most consecutive wins of any player at any position in major league history.

While he played his first seven seasons with the Dodgers, he really found a home when he became a Met after a trade with the Florida Marlins on May 22, 1998.

“I enjoyed coming up with the Dodgers and had an amazing career there as far as getting to know Sandy Koufax and Don Drysdale and the Hall of Famers,” Piazza recollected. “But, fortunately for me, I eventually ended in New York. Some way, shape or form, I became a New York Met, and truly have a special relationship here with the fans of the Mets.

“I feel like the fans here truly brought me into their family. Every time I’ve come back, I’ve been so incredibly honored from the response.”

Upon arriving in New York, Piazza gave the Mets the superstar that they had been searching for. Someone with star power that could compete with their crosstown rivals.

“We needed that,” said Al Leiter. “When you finally get that, it absolutely legitimizes where the team is going.”

He went on to make the All-Star team in seven of his eight seasons as a Met and helped lead them to the NLCS in 1999 and then, a year later, the World Series. He hit 427 career home runs, the most ever by a catcher, and more than half of those (220) came while he was a Met. His first as a member of the Mets came on June 1, 1998 off Pittsburgh’s Jason Schmidt in the eighth inning. His 220 home runs are third-most by any Met behind Darryl Strawberry (252) and David Wright (242).

None of his 220 home runs as a Met, however, had (and continues to have to
this day) a lasting impact on the population of New York City as the one he hit on September 21, 2001 following the September 11th terrorist attacks.

His mammoth blast in the eighth inning off Atlanta’s Steve Karsay not only gave the Mets the lead when they were trailing by one, but it helped heal the city of New York in a time when it needed a beacon of light. It brought the 41,235 fans at Shea in attendance that night bursting to their feet.

“I get emotional thinking back to that week,” Piazza said. “It’s something you can’t define. It changed all of our lives. Not just at a baseball level, but personally for me. It really put my life into perspective and what the important things are.“

“For me to be at the right place and the right time and to come through, I can only think it comes from above and a lot of people that put wind under my wings.”

Piazza went on to play in orange and blue for four more seasons and hit 83 more home runs. His 352nd home run as a catcher, which broke Carlton Fisk’s record for home runs by a catcher, came in the first inning on May 5, 2004 vs. San Francisco off Jerome Williams. He’d finish his career with the aforementioned 427 career home runs in his primary position of catcher. Also of note, his 396 career home runs while playing the position of catcher are also most by anyone who has ever played the game.

A year-and-a-half later, Piazza played his final game as a Met on October 2, 2005. He didn’t grab a hit in his final game at Shea, but when removed in the eighth inning, Piazza received an eight-minute standing ovation from the 47,718 faithful New Yorkers.

After a few years bouncing around to Oakland and San Diego, Piazza called it a career following the 2007 season. When it was all said and done, it would only be a matter of time for Piazza’s call from the Hall to come with the career numbers he’d put up. His .545 career slugging percentage is the highest all-time among catchers while his .308 batting average is eighth all-time for backstops. His .377 on-base percentage ranks him 13th all-time for catchers.

While his catching days were officially over, there was still one more pitch that Piazza needed to catch and, not surprisingly, it would come from the only other Met player to be enshrined in Cooperstown, Tom Seaver.

There wasn’t a more fitting dynamic duo for a final pitch and catch to close Shea Stadium on September 28, 2008 than Seaver to Piazza with 56,059 looking on at two of the team’s icons standing 60-feet, six-inches from one another. Seaver delivered the pitch to Piazza and then the two met at the mound and walked out, arms around one another. They’d go on to open Citi Field the same way.

“Without a doubt Mike Piazza was one of the top hitting catchers in the history of the game,” said Hall of Famer Tom Seaver. “For Mike to compile the stats he did while catching is amazing. His election to Cooperstown is most deserving.”

The wait for Piazza’s next honor won’t be long, as the Mets will honor the catcher by retiring his number 31 on July 30 when the Mets take on the Rockies at Citi Field as part of a Mike Piazza Tribute Weekend. His number, fittingly, will sit next to Seaver’s in permanent recognition in the ballpark.

Seaver’s No. 41 became the first number worn by a Mets player to be retired when the Mets bestowed the honor on Seaver when he was elected to the Mets Hall of Fame on July 24, 1988. Now, the honor is coming to Piazza.

“We are truly thrilled to honor Mike by retiring his number to recognize his incredible career,” said Mets COO Jeff Wilpon. “His offensive prowess, ability to deliver in the clutch, and tireless work ethic helped him become one of the great catchers of all-time.”

“It is such a tremendous honor to have my number retired alongside the great Tom Seaver,” Piazza said. “My time as a Met was truly special and I want to thank Fred, Saul, Jeff and the entire organization for this incredible gesture.”

When Piazza stood up to deliver his speech on the lawn in Cooperstown, it marked the culmination of all he had worked for over the course of his entire career. The player that almost didn’t get drafted, that toiled for years in the minors and waited years after his retirement for this recognition, will now forever be enshrined among the greatest, sporting the blue and orange cap he wore so proudly during his days in New York.

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“Bretagne” Last known 9/11 Ground Zero search dog still lends a helping paw. #RescueDogs #NeverForget #Honor911

By Laura T. Coffey: TODAY
9/10/14

Some heroes boast muscle and brawn. Others possess steely nerves and impeccable timing. But this hero is a little different.

This one has feathery fur, a sunny smile, a calm nature and — for a dog — an uncanny ability to zero in on the people who need her most. She’s a 15-year-old golden retriever named ‘Bretagne’, and she’s believed to be the last surviving search dog who worked at Ground Zero in New York City after the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. (One other surviving search dog from 9/11, a 15-year-old English springer spaniel named Morgan, worked at Staten Island.)

For the first time since the recovery efforts after the attack, Bretagne returned this week to the site of the former World Trade Center complex with her longtime handler and owner, Denise Corliss of Cypress, Texas. They were joined by NBC News’ Tom Brokaw, who will tell their story on TODAY on Thursday morning, Sept. 11.