territorial conflict

fun fact: procrastination happens to animals too. it’s a naturall thing.

animal equivalents for scrolling tumblr include:
 - hamsters starting to wash their faces in inaproppriate situations
 - hyenas stopping everything and starting to dig holes in the ground.
 - seagulls starting to ruffle their feathers instead of doing important things

this happens for two reasons: 

1) an animal is in the situation where none of the standard scenarious it has are fitting, so it does the next best thing 
(example: hamsters were put in a vibrating bowl, they couldn’t run or attack, so in about a minute they stopped everything and started washing their faces.)

2) an animal has two conflicting instincts fighting for dominance, so the third one, usualy suppressed by them, kicks in.
(example: when two hyenas meet at the border of their territories, they have an instinct to protect their own territory conflict with an instinct not to cross someone else’s. they don’t know if they need to attack or leave, so both start digging holes in the ground.
example: a seagull sitting on the nest needs to protect her children, but also has to go get some food. instead a seagull settles for ruffling her feathers for two hours.)

with humans it’s usually the second reason.
(example: I’m tired and I want to go to sleep, but I should write an essay for tomorrow. both these things are important, so I’m procrastinating them by writing this post.)

nature is beautiful.
I’m gonna go to sleep now.

10

Dik-Dik

A dik-dik is the name for any of four species of small antelope in the genus Madoqua that live in the bushlands of eastern and southern Africa. Dik-diks stand about 12–15.5 inches at the shoulder, weigh 6.6–13.2 pounds, and can live for up to 10 years. Dik-diks are named for the alarm calls of the females. In addition to the females’ alarm call, both the male and female make a shrill, whistling sound. 

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Are You Not Alarmed?

Donald Trump told The Washington Post that he may have military parades in America like this one in North Korea in 2015. Ed Jones/AFP/Getty

By Charles M. Blow for The New York Times. January 19, 2017 [x]

Donald Trump may push us into another war.    

I continue to be astonished that not enough Americans are sufficiently alarmed and abashed by the dangerous idiocies that continue to usher forth from the mouth of the man who will on Friday be inaugurated as president of the United States. 

Toss ideology out of the window. This is about democracy and fascism, war and peace, life and death. I wish that I could write those words with the callous commercialism with which some will no doubt read them, as overheated rhetoric simply designed to stir agitation, provoke controversy and garner clicks. But alas, they are not. These words are the sincere dispatches of an observer, writer and citizen who continues to see worrisome signs of a slide toward the exceedingly unimaginable by a man who is utterly unprepared. 

In a series of interviews and testimonies Donald Trump and his cronies have granted in the last several days, they have demonstrated repeatedly how destabilizing, unpredictable and indeed unhinged the incoming administration may be. Their comments underscore the degree to which this administration may not simply alter our democracy beyond recognition, but also potentially push us into armed conflict. 

Last week, Trump’s secretary of state nominee, Rex Tillerson, said during his confirmation hearing that the United States had to “send China a clear signal that, first, the island-building stops, and second, your access to those islands also is not going to be allowed.” 

The only way to do this is with some sort of naval blockade, which China would undoubtedly interpret as an act of war. 

Indeed, as Business Insider reported, Chinese state-run media responded in an editorial, “Unless Washington plans to wage a large-scale war in the South China Sea, any other approaches to prevent Chinese access to the islands will be foolish.” 

Business Insider quoted Bonnie Glaser, a senior adviser for Asia and the director of the China Power Project at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, who pointed out that Tillerson’s position could easily result in war. 

If the United States put “a cordon of ships around one or all of the islands, and the Chinese flew in aircraft to one of their new islands, what are we going to do? Shoot it down?” Glaser asked. “We’d certainly end up in a shooting war with China.” But even short of the conflict over the islands, The Wall Street Journal’s Andrew Browne suggested Tuesday, Trump’s talk on trade alone could escalate into an armed conflict with China. Trump has said he will make continued adherence to the “one China” policy — which recognizes Beijing as the sole government of China — conditional on negotiations over what he sees as currency manipulation and other unfair trade practices by China. 

As Browne points out: 

“The gambit has profound security and military implications. Taiwan is a regional flash point. Beijing regards the island as an inalienable part of Chinese territory; ‘One China’ expresses not just its political desire for unification but a core part of Chinese identity. Chinese leaders will fight for it. They can’t lose Taiwan.” 

Make no mistake: As bad of an actor as China is, the United States actually depends on China. It is one of our biggest trade partners, but furthermore it is one of the last remaining checks on an erratic North Korea. China could simply stop using its influence to make North Korea behave. 

And as you may recall, during the campaign Trump suggested that the way to contain North Korea was for nuclear proliferation in the region. In March, Trump said of nuclear weapons: “You have so many countries already — China, Pakistan, you have so many countries, Russia — you have so many countries right now that have them.” He continued: “Now, wouldn’t you rather, in a certain sense, have Japan have nuclear weapons when North Korea has nuclear weapons?” 

Then there is the destabilizing and downright frightening random rhetoric. Trump has suggested that he equally trusts America’s friend-in-arms Angela Merkel and his friend-in-spirit Vladimir Putin. 

Trump told The Washington Post this week that he may start having military parades in major American cities à la North Korea: 

“Being a great president has to do with a lot of things, but one of them is being a great cheerleader for the country.” He continued: “And we’re going to show the people as we build up our military, we’re going to display our military. That military may come marching down Pennsylvania Avenue. That military may be flying over New York City and Washington, D.C., for parades. I mean, we’re going to be showing our military.” 

And, Trump continues to trash NATO, calling it “obsolete.” This is insanity. But too many Americans don’t want to see this threat for what it is. International affairs and the very real threat of escalating militarization and possibly even military conflict seems much harder to grasp than the latest inflammatory tweet. 

Maybe people think this possibility is unthinkable. Maybe people are just hoping and praying that cooler heads will prevail. Maybe they think that Trump’s advisers will smarten him up and talk him down. 

But where is your precedent for that? When has this man been cautious or considerate? This man with loose lips and tweeting thumbs may very well push us into another war, and not with a country like Afghanistan, but with a nuclear-armed country with something to prove. 

Are you not alarmed? 

Frankenstein Castle

With Halloween just around the corner, let’s take a look at one of Germany’s creepiest places: Frankenstein Castle.

Frankenstein Castle sits on a hilltop overlooking the city of Darmstadt. It was constructed sometime before the year 1250 by Lord Conrad II Reiz of Breuberg, who founded the free imperial Barony of Frankenstein. Over the coming centuries, the castle was home to various different families and witnessed several territorial conflicts. In 1673, Johann Conrad Dippel - who later became an alchemist - was born in the castle. The structure fell into ruins in the 18th century and was restored in the mid-19th century.

The most famous story is, of course, that of the alchemist who worked in the castle in the 17th century. He was known to experiment with strange potions. He supposedly created an animal oil (which he named “Dippel’s Oil”) that was a so-called “elixir of life”. There are also rumors that the man studied anatomy and conducted experiements on cadavers, some of which he dug up himself from graves. There is no evidence that proves that any of this happened, but local people believe the legends are true.

It is believed that this historic castle and the story of the alchemist inspired Mary Shelley’s 1818 novel “Frankenstein.” There is evidence that the author traveled to the region before writing her book. And it’s no wonder that the castle served as an inspiration for her spooky ideas: the structure is surrounded by thick, dark forests shrouded in mystery, legends and folklore. There is a place in the forest where compasses do not work properly. The castle grounds were allegedly also home to a dragon in the early 1800s and a fountain of youth that continues to attract women during a full moon.

When a group of American Airmen from the 435th Transportation Squadron heard these stories in 1978, they had an idea: they would start an annual Halloween festival at this creepy castle. Today, the Halloween festival at Frankenstein Castle is one of the largest in Europe. If you’re in Germany this Halloween and would like to find a place to celebrate this spooky American holiday, head over to Frankenstein Castle - you’ll be sure to get a good scare!

warwolf-26  asked:

Why is it we skip over ww1 and focus on www? What are your thoughts and opinions on why this war wasn't documented nearly as much as the later?

Holy moly I am so very sorry if you sent this a long time ago.  I don’t know when you sent this ask friend but I’m going to make up for it by answering now because I’m going to try to get back into blogging about this history that’s so important to me. I have been having a really hard time focusing on blogging lately but I’m trying to get back into the swing. I hope this makes up for it a little bit. 

I think it’s not a matter of why but where friend, personally. I can’t speak to the education in other countries but here in the US we usually focus schooling on stuff that involves America more than anything else and something like the Great War was mainly a European war. The US was really only involved for the tail end, something like seven months in a very very established conflict already that was really deeply rooted in European history and colonialism and old territories. Not really a conflict many Americans had any interest in joining or supporting. I think that’s kind of why its gets skipped over these days, its easy to kind of leave it as a side note I think instead because we weren’t really involved until the end of it all.  However the reality of the situation is its really important regardless, but if everything I thought was important history wise to teach then we wouldn’t ever get out of history class. 

On another note, I think its a hard situation to understand in some ways because right after the war ended anyway there was a lot of coverage about what had happened and trying to figure out exactly why it happened. The idea of war was still tied to the idea of a great adventure to be had by young men, you know? Most of these kids grew up hearing stories about their grandfathers going to war. But there was nothing heroic about dying in the mud an it really changed the way the entire generation thought about warfare, the implications of new weapons and modern thinking tied to the catastrophic loss following the war.  What happened was horrific and I think, but I think it was really a product of the time to kind of move on without blaming any of the victors for what had happened. It’s a tricky thing to pick apart.

Thank you for your question! Sorry for the long silence guys I am trying really hard to get back into blogging but I’m having a hard time getting back into it. I promise I’ll make a better effort. This year has really really gotten away from me in the worst way. 

ladybug1596  asked:

Hi! Okie so I have a question. You guys are vampire princes so obviously you sometimes involved with the politics of the demon world so have you ever been at war with werewolves? Furthermore do you dislike werewolves

“Many wars have ensued between vampires and werewolves, natural enemies really. As far as the current political climate, it is in it’s better days. We try to keep our distance from each other and respect territory, but the underlying conflict is still present. As a group, vampires and werewolves have never, and predictably will never be able to live completely peacefully. Personally, I don’t particularly dislike werewolves, as there are ‘good’ and ‘bad’ on both sides –I would be the one to know– and will judge someone on their manners and the way they carry themselves. I wouldn’t fool myself into thinking that one’s blood determines their likeability. Shuu and I come from the same blood, but he is a nuisance.”

- Asarys

Walk through the fire

Strategist and priestess Lucy Heartfilia gets caught up in the turmoil of war. Torn between duty and love she must decide whether to follow her heart or mind because the destiny of two nations rests on her shoulders.


Chapter 1: Doubt

“Doubt is an uncomfortable condition, but certainty is a ridiculous one.”


Year 1325,

Icenberg kingdom, near town Dräntah,


The eyes of Lucy Heartfilia could see everything from the highest platform of Icenberg’s defence but the scene, unfolding before her, made her lips tighten even more. Besides the dark yellow of the dry earth another color was also ruling in the lands south from Dräntah. The enemy forces, all dressed in black armors were standing only a few kilometers away. In some places Lucy could even distinguish red spots – Pregrande Empire’s battle flags. The enemy was just too powerful because of its sudden decision to attack. In the distance the army looked like an enormous, dark fog, like an ancient heavenly power, ready to slay the mortal humans. What unnerved her was that they were waiting for orders and were dangerously close to the borders of Icenberg. If they decided to attack the town there was no one who could stop them.

This year the signs from the stars hadn’t been so good. Even at the beginning of the spring there had been small warnings of the great drought that would follow. A couple of months later and even a single drop of water hadn’t fallen from the sky. The earth, cracked and aged, was suffering from the lack of life. All of that reflected on the citizens as well. Icenberg was famous with its vast and cold territory. It was completely normal for everyone when six months there was snowfalls and the other six months rain and fog. The people had been living in this kind of weather their whole lives. They even liked it. The plants, which they were growing, were also used to the harsh conditions. These last weeks though all the vegetation was destroyes by the constant heat and drought.

Even the usually deep river Guang, which had taken the role of the south border between Pregrande and Icenberg, was completely dried, leaving the boundary defence without protection.

Pregrande and Icenberg had been having conflicts for years now because of some territories. These conflicts sometimes grew into small battles but never something so serious as to attack directly. Until now.

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anonymous asked:

What do you like about eto? Can you describe her character?

Eto is just…….she’s probably one of the best villains I’ve come across in a long time.

Remember how we started out thinking she was four different characters? She was Sen Takatsuki, the quirky and mysterious author. She was Eto, that weird and creepy Mummy Kid. She was The One-Eyed King, the myth that supposedly led Aogiri. And She was the One-Eyed Owl, the terror that caused so much suffering.

Surprise, she was all four of them the entire time. It was Dio Eto all along. She was the mastermind behind so much, just playing everyone around her the entire time.

She’s very complex, and that makes her very fascinating. Her intelligence is her most obvious trait, her ability to understand people and pick them apart. We’ve been told that her writing is very complex, with incredibly delicate but disturbing prose. She weaves these incredible stories that are interconnected, and hides so many things beneath layers of words. (She’s Ishida, basically.)

Beneath that layer, she know that she is a very disturbed and damaged person. She hates the world so much, and has very twisted views about Love. From what we can gather, she is someone that has slowly killed her own heart in order to survive, and has given up on people. She is in incredible pain, and that makes her lash out at everything in truly horrifying ways.

She was someone that her parents hoped could be a branch between two worlds, and her very birth represents this incredible Love and Devotion. Her parents loved each other so much, and Ukina loved her so much she ate human flesh so that her baby could be born. Yoshimura loved her so much, he killed Ukina and has lived his entire life since then wanting nothing more than to see his child but knowing all he can do for her is stay away. He has done so much for her, but it seems she only feels hate for him since he abandoned her. She’s unable to see the love in that act, that he has done everything for the sake of her survival.

She has managed to create the largest Ghoul organization known, with hundreds of Ghouls devoted to her cause. She is a one-woman revolution, though few know this. That means she is incredibly charismatic, to have gotten a species normally prone to territorial conflicts and avoiding each other to band together as this enormous terrorist organization.

Eto is also a terrifying sadist. She enjoys destroying people, and I think takes particular joy in destroying the bonds of love. She destroys families, and she twists love into something horrible. She manipulated Hinami through her desire to help, twisted Takizawa into a mockery of everything he once was, and now seeks to twist Kanae’s love into something horrible.

I think, at the very core, Eto wants to be loved. But she doesn’t believe in it. She has so much pain and hate, so much resentment for the world that took everything from her and forced her to be a monster. But she’s embraced that, and become the most terrifying and powerful monster possible.

She’s also a female villain that is noted for her beauty, and has appeared naked twice. But she isn’t sexual or sensual, or played for fanservice. She defies those common tropes about a villainess.

Just…..I love Eto so much. She’s incredible and horrible. She’s like this angry force of nature.

Israeli soldiers detain a protester during a demonstration by Palestinians protesting against the Israeli-built West Bank separation barrier and calling for the right of return for Palestinian refugees, in the northern West Bank city of Tulkarem. The separation barrier follows a route that often dips into the Palestinian territories of the West Bank captured by Israel in the 1967 war.
May31 2014
Nasser Ishtayeh/AP

More vikings! Perhaps Marco and Jean are sons of two chieftains trying to settle territory conflicts? Maybe one clan is from the south while the other is from the north, and Jean n Marco end up being the conflict settlers. asjdflk idfk

Reminder that I am eligible for Overseas Citizenship of India (India’s constitution doesn’t allow for actual dual citizenship, but this is essentially a lifelong visa) and could obtain OCI status far more easily than I could ever obtain Israeli citizenship, but that nobody has ever, once, in my 32 years of existence, held me accountable for the actions of the Indian government, despite the fact that India is embroiled in a territorial conflict with Pakistan over disputed land (Kashmir) that harkens back to the 1948 partition, and that Modi’s government is pulling some truly horrendous shit right now. 

HMM I WONDER WHY THAT IS?

Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice: Clark Joseph Kent / Kal-El [ESFJ]

OFFICIAL TYPING by Charity / The Mod. SPOILERS.

Extroverted Feeling (Fe): Clark’s focus is so outward he spends less time taking care of his own needs than trying to protect humanity. Their rejection of his assistance, to the point of fearing him or wanting to hold him accountable for his actions, hurts him deeply. Clark cares so much that he turns up for his “trial” to “explain his actions,” even though no force on earth could compel him to do so, if he did not want them all to understand his perspective.

Introverted Sensing (Si): The past haunts him. He continually looks back to his father’s advice, and the circumstances that brought him to this moment. Clark tends to react in the present, at times not seeing the fall-out of his decisions until it is too late; he saves Lois, creating a huge territorial conflict overseas; he berates himself for not “seeing” the bomb in the courthouse, because he was too wrapped up in his perceptions and thoughts to be aware of his environment. His plowing through of Metropolis indicates his focus was so intently on defeating Zod that he lost all contact with his external environment.

Extroverted Intuition (Ne): He gradually pieces together truths about Bruce Wayne and Batman, but tends to rely less on gut instinct and more on tangibles to make his case or form his decisions. He has a semi-optimistic attitude about life, thinking things could go positively or negatively; but under stress, Clark can become pessimistic and self-defeating in his attitude, needing Lois to pull him back up with reassurances (Fe and Ne, in sharing alternate possibilities).

Introverted Thinking (Ti): Even though his focus is primarily humanitarian, Clark tends to brood… and spend a lot of time inside his head. He is more distant from the world and the people in it, sometimes making cold decisions to benefit a greater good. He can be critical, even ruthless on himself for his own mistakes.

Statue of Don José I the Reformer, King of Portugal and the Algarves.

One of the most difficult situations faced by the Portuguese King was the Franco-Spanish attempt to conquer Portugal, by the end of the Seven Years War.

France and Spain sent an ultimatum in order to force Portugal to abandon its alliance with Great Britain and close ports to British ships. Don José I refused to submit and asked for British help. England sent a force of 7,104 men, which reformed the Portuguese army and combined together, they led 14-15,000 men in a victorious war against an army of over 50,000 enemies.

The Bourbon invaders were defeated by a combination of popular uprising, scorched earth strategy, famine and encircling movements by the regular Anglo-Portuguese troops, which like the militia, skilfully used the mountainous terrain of East of Portugal at their advantage.

The Spanish and French troops suffered staggering losses when they were driven out from Portugal, and were then chased into Spain.

The confrontations between Portugal and Spain in South America during the Seven Years War ended in a tactical stalemate. However, while the Spaniards lost to the Portuguese nearly all the territory conquered during the conflict, Portugal retained all its conquests.

This war is usually referred to as the “Fantastic War” or “Spanish–Portuguese War (1762–1763)”.

Accounts from 18th century authors about this war.

“The preservation of Portugal cost Spain its glory, its treasure, and an army. The Court of Spain ordered 40,000 men to march into Portugal, the Spanish forces, when they arrived at the frontier, were reduced to 25,000 men, and never did troops experience a more horrible campaign. The sick and the stragglers were almost all of them massacred. The ill-success of the campaign in Portugal covered Spain with dishonor, and exhausted her to such a degree as to keep her quiet till the peace.“

— Charles François Dumoriez

“The discrediting and destruction of a splendid (Spanish) army in the last entry [invasion of Portugal], persuaded Europe that our power was more imaginary than real. Portugal remains independent of Spain, and why our wars against it usually end in disgrace, which will continue until we take other dispositions.”

— Contemporary anonymous Spanish author

“There is no people like the Portuguese, tomorrow we will have one of the worst confrontations, I checked the front lines one more time, I saw many barefooted soldiers, captains that didn’t even have a sword, I found a sentinel patrolling with a musket without doglock, which means, the musket won’t protect him in case he’s attacked. From the hillside, a group of unarmed volunteers appeared and offered their services, I asked with what, they said they were counting on their bags filled with stones. Such honorable and incredible people I was allowed to lead.” 

— Wilhelm, the Count of Schaumburg-Lippe, who led the Portuguese army during the Fantastic War. (When the war ended, the Count of Lippe refused to receive any payment offered from his services to the Portuguese crown.)

The reign of Don José is famous for the great Lisbon earthquake, tsunami, firestorm of November 1, 1755, in which around 100,000 people died. 

From 1750 onward, the Brazilian gold supply (which made Portugal by far the largest gold owner on earth during the 18th century) started its irreversible decline, and the price of Brazilian sugar also fell as British and Dutch demand reduced.

soemily  asked:

OKAY SO I basically feel I will love every fic you ever choose to write, so I feel I can't choose just one! but I CAN ask your AU headcanon ideas of what amis in space would study at space school?

You are MUCH TOO LOVELY TO ME. <3 And what a great thing to ask!

Okay, so. I am assuming this is generic space school for reasons.

Joly, surprising no one, ends up a doctor. Joly studies space doctoring (and is full of cool-gross facts about what happens to injuries and illnesses IN SPACE.) It’s a very fine line between Joly being a space doctor and a space mad scientist.

Feuilly, while forever absorbed in studying territorial conflicts and politics of space colonies, is actually studying how to repair finicky, delicate spaceship instruments, which is always vital in a space-faring mission.

Jehan is definitely a botanist and is mostly learning how to sustain plant life in space, but he’s also learning about xenobotany and cultivation efforts on extraterrestrial colonies.

Enjolras, though everyone agrees he would be excellent as captain of a small vessel (and therefore is taking some options in pursuit of it), is very invested in his studies about conflict management and maintaining equitable sociopolitical systems on ships/in colonies. It is an incredibly important job.

Bossuet started studying piloting, but bad luck necessitated a switch to communications. And though Bossuet is very good with both faster-than-light communications devices and radio, Bossuet proooobably ends up doing something entirely unrelated (like teaching children).

Courfeyrac was initially disappointed not to get a chance to train as a pilot, but unexpectedly ended up loving (and switched to studying) what is essentially space HR. Courfeyrac is good at people and figuring out what they need and what they’re good at doing, and has close attention to detail. Even better to do it in space.

No one knows how long Bahorel has been at space school. No one knows what Bahorel technically studies, because Bahorel is in all classes and no classes. (Bahorel is supposed to be studying space law but keeps taking minor specializations to avoid it and now has a good grasp of most of the things that go into running a thriving community in space.)

Combeferre is studying some type of engineering (because Combeferre gets very enthusiastic about making things work in new environments), but is also taking enough courses for a medic/nurse’s certification, since that’s always good to have on hand.

Grantaire is studying to be a navigator/astrocartographer, and secretly is very good at it, though incredibly grumpy and always avoiding the subject (“Of course I’m familiar with the stars, when you all keep hooking them to the ceiling in front of my poor eyes, uuuuugh.”)

Bonus round!

Éponine doesn’t care what strings are attached to her scholarship as long as she can keep her siblings (and herself) safe, but she does, very quietly, like the work she does with computers.

Marius originally started studying space law as well, but after falling out with Gillenormand, switched to studying communications and language, picking them up quickly and learning that work can actually be enjoyable.

Cosette’s major focus is on botany, because she’s good at it and it’s a productive skill if her father decides to run across the universe, but she makes time to pick up other useful skills too.

There’s a certain woman with a quick laugh who studies astrophysics and smiles at the stars and planets spinning endlessly.

Musichetta is studying xenobotany, with a specific focus on marine life, but she’s stayed general enough that she has options about what to do with it, and she is completely happy with her subject, which she loves so much.

Their five year mission: to spread freedom, love, and equality across the galaxy.

Don José I the Reformer, King of Portugal and the Algarves.

One of the most difficult situations faced by the Portuguese King was the Franco-Spanish attempt to conquer Portugal, by the end of the Seven Years War.

France and Spain sent an ultimatum in order to force Portugal to abandon its alliance with Great Britain and close her ports to British ships. Don José I refused to submit and asked for British help. England sent a force of 7,104 men, which reformed the Portuguese army and combined together, they led 14-15,000 men in a victorious war against an army of over 50,000 enemies.

The Bourbon invaders were defeated by a combination of popular uprising, scorched earth strategy, famine and encircling movements by the regular Anglo-Portuguese troops, which like the militia, skilfully used the mountainous terrain of East of Portugal at their advantage.

The Spanish and French troops suffered staggering losses when they were driven out from Portugal, and were then chased into Spain.

The confrontations between Portugal and Spain in South America during the Seven Years War ended in a tactical stalemate. However, while the Spaniards lost to the Portuguese nearly all the territory conquered during the conflict, Portugal retained all its conquests.

This war is usually referred to as the “Fantastic War” or “Spanish–Portuguese War (1762–1763)”.

Accounts from 18th century authors about this war.

“The preservation of Portugal cost Spain its glory, its treasure, and an army. The Court of Spain ordered 40,000 men to march into Portugal, the Spanish forces, when they arrived at the frontier, were reduced to 25,000 men, and never did troops experience a more horrible campaign. The sick and the stragglers were almost all of them massacred. The ill-success of the campaign in Portugal covered Spain with dishonor, and exhausted her to such a degree as to keep her quiet till the peace.“

— Charles François Dumoriez

“The discrediting and destruction of a splendid (Spanish) army in the last entry [invasion of Portugal], persuaded Europe that our power was more imaginary than real. Portugal remains independent of Spain, and why our wars against it usually end in disgrace, which will continue until we take other dispositions.”

— Contemporary anonymous Spanish author

“There is no people like the Portuguese, tomorrow will have one of the worst confrontations, I checked the front lines one more time, I saw many barefooted soldiers, captains that didn’t even have a sword, I found a sentinel patrolling with a musket without doglock, which means, the musket wouldn’t protect him in case he’d be attacked. From the hillside, a group of unarmed volunteers appeared and offered their services, I asked with what, they said they were counting on their bags filled with stones. Such honorable and incredible people I was allowed to lead.”

— Wilhelm, the Count of Schaumburg-Lippe, who led the Portuguese army during the Fantastic War. (When the war ended, the Count of Lippe refused to receive any payment offered from his services to the Portuguese crown.)

The reign of Don José is famous for the great Lisbon earthquake, tsunami, firestorm of November 1, 1755, in which around 100,000 people died.

From 1750 onward, the Brazilian gold supply (which made Portugal by far the largest gold owner on earth during the 18th century) started its irreversible decline, and the price of Brazilian sugar also fell as British and Dutch demand reduced. 

When a territorial issue ceases to be a practical matter and enters the realm of ‘national emotions,’ it creates a dangerous situation with no exit.
It is like cheap liquor: Cheap liquor gets you drunk after only a few shots and makes you hysterical. It makes you speak loudly and act rudely… . But after your drunken rampage you are left with nothing but an awful headache the next morning.
We must be careful about politicians and polemicists who lavish us with this cheap liquor and fan this kind of rampage.
—  Haruki Murakami - About the conflict between China and Japan