terrestrial broadcasting

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Humanity’s First Interstellar Postcard

On November 16, 1974, scientists broadcast the first interstellar message out to the stars, a program that later became known as METI, the Message to Extra-terrestrial Intelligence.  Like SETI (the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence), METI is a series of extremely small programs.  To date, only 9 messages have been transmitted by a variety of organizations:

  • {The Morse Message (1962)}
  • Arecibo message (1974)
  • Cosmic Call 1 (1999)
  • Teen Age Message (2001)
  • Cosmic Call 2 (2003)
  • Across the Universe (2008)
  • A Message From Earth (2008)
  • Hello From Earth (2009)
  • RuBisCo Stars (2009)
  • Wow! Reply (2012)

The first message, known as the Morse Message, does not technically belong on this list as the Russians directed the message to Venus, and thus the primary mission was not Interstellar.  The message targets vary in distance from the very short (the majority of targets are under 100 light years away) to the very far, including the Arecibo Message, which targets the M13 globular cluster 24,000 light years away. Messier 13, also known as the Heart of Hercules or Armpit of Hercules, is a globular cluster of several hundred thousand stars, and thought to be a good candidate for alien life.  While there have been some dissenting voices who argue that ‘revealing’ our location to enemy or hostile alien civilisations is ill-advised at best, most scientific consensus agrees that due to the physical restrictions on speed and travel (as currently understood) we are in no danger of imminent attack.  While the Arecibo Message won’t reach its target for another 25,000 years or so, the first of the other messages should arrive by 2029.  Other scientist point out that our current terrestrial radio and television broadcasts represent their own METI signal and thus we have no need to fund additional broad- or narrow-cast messages.  

Image of the Arecibo Message of 1679 bits in the public domain.  

6

[AKB Horror Night]’s last heroine, the general manager Yokoyama Yui will have two endings!?

The synopsis of Yui’s episode [Remake]:
In the final story, Yokoyama played as an inexperienced scriptwriter Noriko. She was asked to remake the script of a drama called “Adrenalin no Yoru” by the producer and was handed a stained/dirty script book. When they looked for the name of the leading actress, it turned out that the woman comitted suicide during the filming which caused this work to go unfinished about ten years ago. When Noriko who continued to work without hesitant felt a presence and turned around, what standing there was….

Yui’s appeal:
Looking back on the filming, Yokoyama, “I played the role in my own way while remembering the quite scary events that I’ve experienced until now. Since I will show you the expressions and voices that you can’t imagine will come from the usual me, so please pay attention to the gap!” appealed.

For the last part, there will be two types of versions, type A is the terrestrial broadcasting version and type B is the online version. Be prepared because you’ll also find two different endings. Yokoyama, “The 1st version has a scary, but fantastic ending while the 2nd version has an ending that makes you feel like you’re there (close to both of them). Each of them has their own scariness,” described each of their attractions.

The voting will start immediately after the last episode (on March 2nd) ended and will be opened until March 10th.

4

“Adventure time shop” in Japan.

Terrestrial broadcasting began in Japan.
I was represented by a picture of joy!

アドベンチャータイムの地上波放送開始、おめでとう!嬉しいですね。
翻訳アプリに頼りまくりなので英語が怪しい気がします。てへへ

The Roadmap to Taylor Swift's Record-Breaking Week in 6 (Not So Easy) Steps

The singer and her hard-charging label defied the odds by brilliantly influencing everything from fans’ emotions to lowered expectations to hit almost 1.3 million in sales.

Here’s a head-scratcher for the digital era: even though U.S. album sales have plummeted 20 percent since Taylor Swift’s last album, Red, was issued in 2012, the singer scored the best opening week of her career with 1989, moving 1.28 million copies, according to Nielsen SoundScan. With that debut, Swift not only registers the only instant-platinum release of 2014, but bests her last effort by 7.6 percent (the only other album to hit the million mark: Frozen, which has sold 3.5 million units, most of them this year) and beats previous 1989 projections of 750,000 (upped to 900,000 on release day and 1.2 million 48 hours later) by some 500,000 copies. So how did she manage to defy expectations and log the biggest week for an album since 2002, when Eminem's The Eminem Show sold 1.32 million in its second chart week? In a classic Swiftian strategy, the 24-year-old under-promises, over-delivers and then some, while behind the scenes, label Big Machine, and its Universal Music Group support system, drives sales with ruthless focus. Here’s how she beat the odds, all with an aw-shucks smile.

1. ENTICE MULTIPLE PURCHASES

It wasn’t just the CD-only, exclusive-to-Target bonus tracks that drove fans to purchase a copy of 1989during release week (a tactic used for Red and 2010's Speak Now as well). Each disc also offers a set of Polaroid-like photos – five different collections were printed, but consumers don’t know which set they’ll receive – and a unique code that can be used to enter the “1989 Swiftstakes,” where the grand prize (250 in all) is two passes to a meet-and-greet experience with the singer and a concert. The catch? The entry period ended Nov. 2, the final day of 1989’s first tracking week.

2. CONNECT WITH FANS SOCIALLY AND EMOTIONALLY

Swift’s fans “want a close connection, and she gives it to them consistently,” says one UMG insider who adds that the singer’s engagement with her audience is “the best we’ve ever seen.” During release week, Swift initiated a frenzy of online conversation by releasing 1989 an hour early, making the announcement on Twitter at 11:18 p.m. ET on Oct. 26. The next day, she began an exhaustive campaign that involved retweeting and reblogging fans on Tumblr who posted pictures of themselves holding the album. With it, the Twitter hashtag #taylurking was born, a cheeky way for Swift to let her fans know she was watching. Throughout the week, more than 2 million mentions of “Taylor Swift” were registered on the platform, with online chatter peaking at 70,000 tweets per minute the night of Oct. 26, according to data provided by Twitter. Moreover, adds the Universal executive, Swift’s fans protect her. “They are superinvolved, making sure that other fans don’t get a copy of the album and upload to the Internet.”

3. TAKE OVER TV AND RADIO

Swift launched 1989 with a live stream, but after shaking it off for the first time, it was bye-bye Web, hello terrestrial broadcast media: The MTV Video Music AwardsGood Morning America (twice), The Ellen DeGeneres ShowThe Voice (twice),America’s Top 40 With Ryan Seacrest, Sirius XM Town Hall, Late Show With David LettermanJimmy Kimmel Live!The Talk – even NPR got in on the rollout. “Taylor, her management and the label were as aggressive as an organization can be,” says another UMG insider of her TV and radio blitz. The end result: 58.6 million people potentially reached.

4. KEEP THE ALBUM OFF STREAMING

Delaying a new album’s arrival at streaming services to help boost initial sales is a tactic that has served top-name artists well, including Swift. So 1989’s non-streaming status was not a surprise – until a week after release, when Big Machine pulled Swift’s entire catalog from interactive streaming services with an ad-supported, free tier – key among them: Spotify – but kept it at premium-tiers and/or pay-only services Beats Music, Rdio, Rhapsody and Google Play All Access, ensuring higher, subscriber-only royalties.

5. MARKET FAR AND WIDE

No stranger to product endorsements and tie-ins, Swift returned to such blue-blooded partners as Diet Coke (her ad features the ultimate hook, dozens of adorable kittens, capped off by a 1989plug) and also teamed up with the ubiquitous Subway for a national promotion. Her album was also carried in supermarket chains including Kroger’s and drug-store chains (Walgreens). And in exchange for the Target exclusives, the country’s second-biggest album retailer responded with a big marketing push.

6. LOWER EXPECTATIONS

Seven weeks ago, UMG projected that 1989 would sell 1.1 million units, but that figure was readjusted to 750,000 units about four weeks before its release. It wasn’t for lack of confidence in Swift’s commercial power, but because overall sales have declined so dramatically in 2014 (blame the shrinking download business and the growth of streaming services) many doubted any artist could hit the first-week million mark. Additionally, there were fears that country fans would abandon Swift because she was fully embracing a pop sound. The payoff: a steady climb in projections, eventually matching in seven days what Beyoncé did in 17 with her surprise-released, self-titled effort, one of 2013’s biggest out-the-gate sellers (as an iTunes exclusive, Beyoncé scanned 617,000 albums in three days). The ever-calculating Swift needs no surprise.

Billboard

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Music track: Backbones – Cake Bake Betty

Reach for the Ghost – a sci-fi meditation about what it means to be human

The first contact with extra-terrestrial life was broadcast world-wide and strange – they wanted nothing whatsoever to do with a technologically unstable race, and they told us as plainly as they could. They would leave one of their own, Salvador (Eddie Izzard), to wait and watch for a time when contact could be reestablished.

Pledging faith in the human race and promising to help us find our way to the stars, Salvador creates an organization dedicated to uplifting humanity. The mystery and excitement surrounding his Institute swiftly reach feverish levels, becoming something of a religion to those who put their old lives aside and join.

Gil So-yeon (Grace Park), a civil engineer who went from planning cities to upgrading the whole planet, is no true believer.  She’s here for the technology, not for the savior.  Still, her dedication to the cause means she rises through the ranks and becomes one of Salvador’s most trusted.  When the CIA contacts her, offering to bring her family to America in exchange for her help in putting Salvador down, she finds herself tempted.

Eddie Broussard (Sinqua Wallis), a hacktivist who’s always been a white-hat rebel, never believed in the first place.  In fact he knows something no one else should know – Salvador’s been here before.  He’s got photos of the man from 1990, and if Salvador is human then whoever is bankrolling his movement has way too much power.

Eddie and So-yeon discover when they pool their research that they’re no closer to the truth – is Salvador human or alien?  Does he even exist? And either way, what’re the leaders of the Institute doing to the worthy few that make it through the final tests?

Put 2-4 actors/actresses in my ask box and I’ll create a fake movie 

From the invention of wireless to Radio Broadcast to Space

The word radio was coined in 1907 after a decade of furious activity to discover the mechanism for wireless transmission.  A decade earlier, French physicist Édouard Branly coined the term radioconductorto describe a means of wireless transmission.  He based his term on the verb radiate which ultimately came from the Latin word radius meaning the spoke of a wheel, a ray or beam of light.  The word radio was first used by itself in a 1907 article by Lee De Forest. It was used five years later by the Navy to distinguish it from other wireless technologies and entered common usage in the next decade.  Radiotechnology advanced so quickly that a little over 50 years later on November 16, 1974, scientists broadcast the first interstellar radio message out to the stars, a program that later became known as METI, the Message to Extra-terrestrial Intelligence. To date, only 9 messages have been transmitted by a variety of organizations:

  • {The Morse Message (1962)}
  • Arecibo message (1974)
  • Cosmic Call 1 (1999)
  • Teen Age Message (2001)
  • Cosmic Call 2 (2003)
  • Across the Universe (2008)
  • A Message From Earth (2008)
  • Hello From Earth (2009)
  • RuBisCo Stars (2009)
  • Wow! Reply (2012) 

The first radio message, known as the Morse Message, does not technically belong on this list as the Russians directed the message to Venus, and thus the primary mission was not Interstellar.  The message targets vary in distance from the very short (the majority of targets are under 100 light years away) to the very far, including the Arecibo Message, which targets the M13 globular cluster 24,000 light years away.  

While there have been some dissenting voices who argue that ‘revealing’ our location to enemy or hostile alien civilizations is ill-advised at best, most scientific consensus agrees that due to the physical restrictions on speed and travel (as currently understood) we are in no danger of imminent attack.  While the Arecibo Message won’t reach its target for another 25,000 years or so, the first of the other messages should arrive by 2029.  Other scientist point out that our current terrestrial radio and television broadcasts represent their own METI signal and thus we have no need to fund additional broad- or narrow-cast messages.  

Image of the Arecibo Radio Telescope courtesy Marius Strom under a Creative Commons 3.0 share alike license.  

Image of the Arecibo Message of 1679 bits in the public domain.