term man

bella-simamaer  asked:

in some of your tags you have "sacred geometry". do really think geometry is sacred? if so do believe there is a code there?

One approach in defining “sacred geometry” is the analysis of its two opposite terms: geometry (with properties like universal, omnipresent, innate of nature etc) and sacred - an anthropic term, man giving sense and purpose to those properties of geometry that he sees and experiences as something divine ( being perfect, harmonic, in equilibrium and so on). Geometry is sacred by definition, to a subjective observer that takes its elements and builds them into a story that “makes sense”, that helps him understand and evolve.

      One of my favourite things about the Orphan Black finale is that, despite the happy ending, Sarah is still not completely alright. She doesn’t have Mrs. S anymore and without the constant life-threatening situations, is scared of things going back to the way they were before she found Beth and stole her identity. The adrenaline has worn off and she no longer knows what to do and fears going back to her old bad habits. She skips out on her high school exam, tries to sell the house, and isolates herself. 

       She sees other people being happy with the lives they could go back to but doesn’t know how to do that and doesn’t want to burden them. And it’s painful to watch but it’s realistic. So often on television we see characters go on traumatic journeys and be perfectly alright once they’re over. We see the credits roll and assume all is well. But that’s not always the case in real life. Trauma follows you sometimes, like a shadow from another room. It’s not all consuming, but it never quite leaves and it wears you down over time. Often to the point where you feel like a hollow shell. You force yourself to be happy for others but quietly resenting them because they don’t understand what you’re going through and you’re too exhausted to reach out to them so you get caught in a vicious, often destructive, cycle. And we see this here with Sarah. Not only that, but we see her start to break out of it as well.

      Sarah has an excellent support network of her sisters. Not only are they there, but they reach out to her. They listen to her, share their stories, help each other. While she always had Felix and Mrs. S, Sarah didn’t really have any good friends and was kind of a drifter. But now she’s more grounded. She has people who she can reach out to and who will always be there for her. And in real life, having a good support network can make an incredible difference in how a person is able to recover from traumatic events and situations. I love this show, all five seasons of it, but those last twenty minutes of Sarah trying to rebuild her life mean more to me than I can put into words right now. Thank you Orphan Black.

[Giving Annabeth a tour of Camp Jupiter]

Percy: All right, let me introduce you to some of the Romans. Come on up here. I’d like you to meet somebody. This is Hazel. She was born in 1928, and she used to be in a long-term relationship with a man, Sammy, who broke her heart, but she didn’t bring any of that into our quest, it did not affect her performance whatsoever, and I’m very proud of her for that.

Annabeth: [shaking hands with Hazel] Hey, Hazel, it’s good to meet you. 

Percy: This little hell-raiser is Reyna. She had crushes on a bunch of different guys. [pointing to Jason] The one over there, in the purple.

Jason: Hey-o!

Percy: Hey-o. And I’m the other crush.

Annabeth: You know, Percy, I don’t need to know everyone’s sexual history.

Percy: Well, perfect, because we have now arrived at Frank, and he has no sexual history.

more fic recs !

i won’t just buy you a rose  by glitterfreezing

Lance is a struggling florist with a passion for poetry and coffee. Keith is a highly frustrated barista at the bookstore-slash-cafe a few blocks away. Their inevitable meeting causes their individual worlds to change forever– for the worse, obviously. The course of true love never did run smooth, but this is just ridiculous.

i wanna love you (but i don’t know if i can) by beautifulbane

Lance and Keith decide to date in secret so their relationship doesn’t make their teammates uncomfortable. It goes about as well as is to be expected.

I’d do it all again by wrenowitch

keith tries to throw a surprise birthday party for lance. shenanigans ensue.

Still Nights by pistolgrip

They’re Lance’s fuzzy blue slippers, it’s almost 4am, and Lance is presumably in the kitchen. The chances that this is a simple late night snack craving plummets, Keith’s gut along with it.

Other by TangoDancer

Lance’s family struggle to come to terms with the man their son and brother have become.

 Ain’t No Rest (for the wicked) by Talinor

Keith, a bounty hunter desperate for money, gets a hefty job offer from a Galra commander- capture the infamous vigilante called Sharpshooter for a hefty sum.

Of course, it gets complicated from there.

the meaning of donuts by Katranga 

Keith realizes he may, potentially, possibly have some feelings for a certain blue paladin and he is Not Thrilled about it.

FUN REMINDER

The terms “trans boy/man/guy/male” and the counterpart “trans girl/women/female” are NOT one word. 

In this context, the modifer “trans” is an adjective. It is describing the noun. What type of boy? A trans boy. 

You wouldn’t say a “prettydog” or “funnymovie” as one word, would you? I’d think not. So don’t make “trans [person]” one word either. 

So I just saw Get Out and this post will have no spoilers but holy shit, does it ever deserve its current perfect score on Rotten Tomatoes.

I’m not going to go on about its racial commentary aspects because I am white as hell and I figure it’s best if I leave that discussion up to POC, but it is just a fantastic horror film and a really well made movie and I highly endorse it.

Some thoughts:

  • I have only ever seen Allison Williams as Peter Pan before and so in my head, for the whole movie, she was Peter Pan
  • The cinematography is so GREAT and claustrophobic and that combined with the fabulous score just puts you so on edge and GAH
  • The preview makes it look like a racial Stepford Wives and it’s SO MUCH WORSE AND MORE DISTURBING, DAMN
  • But honestly though, I was actually the most unnerved during the setup than when things became a straight up horror film because at least then you could tell yourself “well this isn’t actually possible” but before that it’s like the microaggression equivalent of Chinese water torture and it’s so uncomfortable and cringe-worthy and the worst part is hearing shit like “I would have voted for Obama for a third term” or “my man” or “Is [the sex] really better?” and realizing you know people who would say that sort of thing and think they’re not racist at all and then you start to wonder if you’re that obnoxious and it’s almost a relief when things go to hell
  • Except it’s not a relief at all because HOLY SHIT THIS MOVIE
  • also the takeaway for white people here (other than don’t participate in human trafficking and racism) is probably that if you’re like Peter Pan and realizing your community is hella racist, the thing to do about it is not get privately frustrated but not actually stand up for your friends beyond incredulous looks at racist asshats, use your privilege for good, people
  • there is some comedy in this movie, and it’s great because it’s a Jordan Peele film, and it comes in exactly the right spots when you need a bit of levity or you might die of the tension, but it always felt like a proper horror film to me more than a horror comedy
  • the design of the hypnosis sequences are GORGEOUS
  • so there’s some gore in this movie but what you see is pretty much all surgical gore and any gory violence is just implied off screen, you only see blood as a result of violence
  • There’s no sexual violence in this movie, but there is human trafficking so that does imply that sexual violence is happening somewhere
  • There’s also an extended sequence of animal death where you don’t really see much but you hear the most awful pained cries
  • As far as I remember, there aren’t racial slurs or really explicit racist language (like “boy” or “you people” or calling the lead less than human or anything), but there is one scene that is very deliberately and painfully reminiscent of slavery auctions and there’s a lot of fetishizing of black (clothed) bodies by the white characters and casual dehumanization of black lives and at least in my perspective that made it even more uncomfortable and painful because these people probably are totally convinced they’re not at all racists and urgh
  • this movie made me like the TSA
  • like every single line of this movie has significance later, it’s really well-written
  • I know I said I wouldn’t comment on the commentary aspects much, but really, white people should see this movie, it points out a lot of microaggressions and makes you uncomfortable and it should
  • Daniel Kaluuya pretty much carries the movie in a lot of scenes and he’s great, I don’t know what his role in Black Panther is but I can’t wait to see more of him

Signs that you probably like girls (for young wlw and questioning wlw): 

  • You overwhelmingly prefer spending time with girls and feel more comfortable in their presence. 
  • You pay a lot of attention to female celebrities. 
  • You project feelings onto male celebrities and male characters that female characters you like are in romantic relationships with. 
  • You use gender neutral pronouns to refer to a crush. 
  • You read LGBT works or watch LGBT works out of “curiosity”. 
  • You think of yourself as a very invested ally but often get asked if you yourself are gay because of the magnitude of your allyship. 
  • You get extremely uncomfortable when friends and family make homophobic remarks, as if they are personally insulting you. 
  • You gravitate toward the out LGBT people around you. 
  • You find yourself forcing feelings of attraction toward girls down or rationalizing those feelings with all sorts of reasons (”I don’t like girls, I’m just going through a phase” or “I’m only thinking this because no boys talk to me/no boys like me” or “I just admire her fashion” or “I just really want to be her friend”). 
  • You feel guilty and ashamed about the feelings of attraction that you pretend don’t exist. 
  • You flinch when people talk about the “college bisexual phase” or “the bicurious phase” (this really applies to bisexual women). 
  • You don’t truly like male celebrities but you name a token one to appease people (this really applies to lesbians). 
  • You cannot envision yourself in a long-term relationship with a man, you feel uncomfortable at the thought of being with one, or you feel scared about engaging in any sort of intimacy with one (this really applies to lesbians). 
  • You think of yourself as “heteroflexible” or as “experimenting” or “curious” (this applies to bisexual women quite frequently but it also applies to lesbians). 
  • You continually rewatch scenes of f/f romance or intimacy that you’ve seen on television or in movies. 
  • You find yourself replacing pronouns in songs or listening to music written and sung by openly gay female artists. 
  • You try and read f/f works out of “curiosity”. 
  • You feel personally affronted or scared when you witness out wlw near you getting targeted by homophobia. 
  • If you’re looking up “am I gay?” or “how do I know if I like girls” on google or on youtube, trust me: you like girls. 
  • You feel like you have to date a boy just to along with everyone else dating a boy (this applies to lesbians quite frequently but it also applies to bisexual women). 
  • You may be in a relationship with a boy but feel dissatisfied or find your attention settling on girls anyway (this really applies to lesbians). 
  • You may genuinely like boys and get attracted to them which confuses you when you also get attracted to girls, and you find yourself denying that you like girls because you also like boys (this really applies to bisexual women). 

anonymous asked:

It seems Tyler Hoechlin is your favorite live-action Superman, but can you rank the actors from worst to best as you see it (of the current actors, I'm not sold on Hoechlin yet, but I think it has more to do with my dislike of his costume—particularly how the cape attaches—that it distracts me from the character, while Cavill seems to physically look perfect for the part and certainly is capable of the acting and charm, but the script he has to work with is lacking)?

Leaving out Kirk Alyn, John Haymes Newton and Gerard Christopher, since I’m not familiar with their performances:

7. Tom Welling

I feel kind of bad about this one. I grew up watching Smallville, y’know? And in terms of sheer man-hours devoted to the role, Welling has more of a claim to being Superman than anyone other than Bud Collyer. But he…wasn’t great, in retrospect. I suspect it was largely a matter of the material he was given; he did well whenever he actually had something to do, whether as dorky reporter Clark Kent intermittently throughout the final season, or various cases of amnesia/mind control/body-swapping/Red Kryptonite exposure. But outside maybe a sweet spot after he’d grown into the role and before he visibly started to get tired of it, and occasionally when getting to spar with (better) actors like Durance, Rosenbaum, and Glover, he had a weird stiffness when playing regular Clark Kent that for the most part didn’t translate into charm once he couldn’t bank on teen awkwardness anymore, and while that frankly made him a pretty honest depiction of the increasingly dicey version of the character he was written as, it didn’t make for a great take on Superman.

6. Henry Cavill

Cavill’s been more let down by the material than anything else - the unfortunate unifying factor of the bottom three here. When the movies let him be great, he really is great, whether promising Martha that he isn’t going anywhere even after learning the truth about Krypton or fighting for the stories he believes in against Perry White. For the most part though he just seems to be called on to look varying degrees of sad and solemn, asked to call on none of the charm he showed in, say, The Man From U.N.C.L.E. Granted his Superman has a lot to be down about, but there’s no range on display here; I don’t doubt he’s got a great take on the character in him, but for now it’s being kept under wraps.

5. Brandon Routh

Of all the reasons Superman Returns was such a damn shame, maybe the biggest was that it buried any chance of seeing the performance out of Brandon Routh that he so clearly had to offer. He’s a great dorky Clark, a charming Superman, and when the stars line up just right, he really manages to capture the idea of Superman as a melancholy figure - his take doesn’t just seem to be bearing the weight of the world in the philosophical abstract, but much more palpably feels an entire planet crying out for him, knowing he can never save them all but always trying anyway out of unconditional love, very much in line with Garth Ennis and John McCrea’s take on him in Hitman. Unfortunately all that takes up maybe 10-15 minutes of runtime, spending the rest of the movie stalking his ex with a neutral expression until he gets shived by Kevin Spacey and regurgitates Brando at his secret kid. Superman Returns was weird, ya’ll.

4. Dean Cain

I was honestly surprised with myself when I decided Cain won out as the best of the rest outside the big three - I thought for sure it’d be Routh. But the more I thought about it, the more I realized that while Routh’s take is definitely closer to the version of Superman I had in my head, it’s compromised in a way the Superman of Lois & Clark never was: like the take or not, this is a perfect realization of the Superman the creators of the show clearly had in mind. His Clark’s funny, clever, warm, and vulnerable, and while it feels weird for him to be acting that way in the glasses these were the Byrne years, so as an expression of his ‘real’ self it’s pretty on-point. His Superman’s the weaker end, stilted even given it’s supposed to be him putting on a performance in-universe, but there’s such an unironic earnestness there that it typically slid back into charming.

3. George Reeves

I thought for awhile about 2 and 3, ultimately concluding that what was asked of George Reeves was a fair deal simpler. He didn’t much differentiate between Superman and Clark, and his booming radio announcer voice made clear we weren’t supposed to be measuring his performance in terms of whether or not he seemed like a real person. What he was called on to show though, and what he had out the wazoo, was raw charisma. When Jimmy asks him why he burst through a wall rather than using a door and Superman replies with a grin “Well, this seemed a little more spectacular,” you’re 100% willing to buy into that explanation, because yeah, it was spectacular, because Superman’s fantastic. And he could more than hold his own with the best of them when asked to work with more serious material, whether wandering through an amnesic fog in Panic In The Sky with only his instinctive decency to guide him, or here, in the final scene of The Dog Who Knew Superman, where Clark has to deal with a dog not only adoring him, but recognizing him in both identities:

2. Christopher Reeve

I gave Tom Welling his well-earned due earlier, but if you really want to talk about a guy with a solid claim to being Superman, Christopher Reeve didn’t just embed himself on the psyche of a generation, but is still held up today as the unequivocal standard by which the role is set. In all likelihood he’ll always be ‘the’ Superman, in the same way as Sean Connery will always be James Bond, and Bela Lugosi will always be Dracula. He shone like the sun in the costume, he was believably such a wimpy klutz out of it that no one would guess they were the same even when it was staring them in the face, and if anyone has any lingering suspicions that he just had the easy task of playing two extremely arch roles to the hilt, they might be forgetting this bit:

Was it perfect? I don’t know about that - if nothing else there were one or two awkward line readings, and the identity division is so sharp that it’s hard to tell when you’re getting a glimpse of the real guy underneath all the identities. But while I definitely question how much of a positive impact on Superman those movies themselves really had in the long run, Reeve’s performance on its own was an undeniable revelation, everything he did reverberating with such a sincere and powerful sense of decency and love for his fellow man that it not only brought Superman to the life, but frankly changed him forever for the better.

1. Tyler Hoechlin

I expected nothing out of this guy. Not that I by any means thought he’d be bad, but when I heard some dude from Teen Wolf was gonna appear on an episode or two of Supergirl, my reaction was about as intense as…well, what you’d expect upon hearing that some dude from Teen Wolf was showing up on Supergirl, even given who he was playing (granted I’ve never seen Teen Wolf and don’t actually especially know what Teen Wolf is, beyond that it’s based on that werewolf-playing-basketball 80s movie written by…wait, Jeph Loeb?!). Looked fine - and it became clear he actually really did look the part once behind-the-scenes pictures started to come out, rather than that godawful original promo picture - and I figured he’d belt out his best Reeve/Animated Series/Cartoon-on-the-side-of-a-cereal-box brand Generic Superman Performance to cheer Kara on before vanishing into the sunset forever outside of the opening credits. I was plenty interested in the potential long-term ramifications of Superman being allowed on TV again in any capacity for the first time since the 90s, given the influence that suggested Geoff Johns had as the new DC President and what that could mean in terms of other characters showing up down the line, but I wasn’t inclined to think of this as anything other than a stepping stone, only notable in its own right because it meant someone would be wearing the s-shield.

Then we actually saw him.

Where the hell has this guy been all these years? Was he grown in a goddamn laboratory for the part? How did the best Superman ever end up in a minor recurring guest spot on the CW Supergirl show?

It would be so, so easy to leap to the idea that he simply works as a jack-of-all-trades: he’s almost as charming as Reeve, just about as confident as Reeves, nearly as vulnerable as Cain. But that would be selling what he’s doing short - especially given that he probably hasn’t had the opportunity to stretch as far as he could in any of those directions, as his role so far has very much been as Supergirl’s backup dancer. What it comes down to is his general demeanor and how he incorporates those aspects into a whole that feels more fully-realized than any portrayal before him. His Superman and Kent are not only distinctive to the point that within the heightened reality the show occupies you can buy that people think of them as different people, but you can see threads from both of them connecting back to the real Clark you see around Kara. He’s open and warm and authentic in a way none of his predecessors quite were, and he’s able to turn on a dime into steely determination or outright fury while remaining recognizable. He’s above everyone’s heads and vaguely alien at times without ever seeming detached or less than entirely loving of the people around him, able to admit his fears and failings while staying strong and capable of changing for the better, utterly and palpably good without ever sliding into naivete or cartoonishness. In short he has range and nuance, and thanks to that along with the air of laid-back friendliness he brings with him, he more than anyone else to put on the suit feels like a real person. And somehow, that real person feels as much as anyone ever has like Superman. And that’s a hell of an achievement. So someone give him his own goddamn show already.

I Kissed A Robot And I Liked It: A Complete Meltdown by Phillip J. Coulson
  • May: He replaced me with a robot version of myself? How long did it take for you to figure it out?
  • Coulson: 😧😧😧😧😧
  • May: What finally tipped it?
  • Coulson: 😓😓😓😓😓
  • May: Didn't get messy between us, did it?
  • Coulson: ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ 🆘
  • May: After we escape this place, we're definitely opening that bottle of Haig.
  • Coulson: 👌🤥👌🤥👌🤥🆘🆘
  • May: I need to take one for the team... So you'll give me mouth to mouth.
  • Coulson: 😐😐😐😐😐🆘🆘🆘
  • May: Did something weird happen with my robot self?
  • Coulson: 😳😳😳😳😳🆘🆘🆘🆘
  • May: Did I make a move on you?
  • Coulson: 😱😱😱😱😱🆘🆘🆘🆘🆘
  • May: Phil... Did I try to... Kill you?
  • Coulson: ...... 💯🔫🔪💣☠️⚰️
  • May: I knew something was up. What are you not telling me?
  • Coulson: ...... 🍾🥂🍷🍻??
  • May: 💩💩💩💩💩!!!!
  • 🌊🌊🌊🌊🌊🌊🌊🌊🌊🌊🌊
  • Coulson's Ongoing Internal Monologue:
  • 🤖😘🤖😘😍😱😳😐😥😥😥🆘🆘🆘🆘🆘🆘🆘🆘🆘🆘🆘🆘🆘

In the second film, Yondu’s role is vastly expanded. We discover that the real reason he didn’t bring Quill to his father, Ego, wasn’t actually because Quill was a child and therefore small enough to gain access to places grown men couldn’t reach.

The reasons weren’t selfish at all.

Instead, Yondu was protecting Peter from a capricious deity with a murderous intent. “He may have been your father, Quill,” Yondu says of Ego as he rescues Star-Lord, “but he wasn’t your daddy.”

Yondu was.

We crash headlong into the revelation: This dangerous man with his crazy whistle-arrow-of-death and crew of thieves and ne’erdowells is in fact one of the bravest people we’ve ever encountered in the MCU films, going up against a diabolical Celestial to save a little boy’s life.

Then Yondu dies, saving his boy. It’s just another in a litany of heroics that Yondu never boasts about, never lays claim to. It’s beautiful and sad and by far the best death the MCU has given us. The death and the scene after are among the most riveting in any of these films.

….

Yondu isn’t Captain America or Iron Man in terms of his importance to the franchise, but he’s not a minor character either. As Paul Tassi points out, he’s the real star of the second Guardians film (or Michael Rooker is, in any case.) He stole the show, sure, but I’d go one further and say that he’s become one of the most significant figures in the MCU period.

- Erik Kain for Forbes: Why ‘Guardians Of The Galaxy 2’ Is The Most Important Marvel Movie In Years

we should seek to engineer the worst hamilton fic possible and it should include burr and hamilton being differentiated solely by terms like “the older man”/“the younger man” and “the taller man”/“the shorter man”

Indigenous Influences in Canada's Name and Provinces

Canada
The name “Canada” likely comes from the Huron-Iroquois word “kanata,” meaning “village” or “settlement.” In 1535, two Aboriginal youths told French explorer Jacques Cartier about the route to kanata; they were actually referring to the village of Stadacona, the site of the present-day City of Québec. For lack of another name, Cartier used the word “Canada” to describe not only the village, but the entire area controlled by its chief, Donnacona.

Quebec
The name “Quebec” comes from the Algonquin word for “narrow passage” or “strait”.

Ontario
Ontario acquired its name from the Iroquois word “kanadario”, which translates into “sparkling” water. The earliest recording of the name Ontario was in 1641 where it was used to describe a mass of land on the north shore of the easternmost part of the Great Lakes.

Manitoba
The name is believed to have originated with Cree term “Man-into-wahpaow”, meaning “the narrows of the Great Spirit”, which describes Lake Manitoba and how it narrows significantly at the centre.

Saskatchewan
The name of the province comes from the Cree name for the Saskatchewan River, “Kisiskatchewanisipi” or “swift-flowing river.” The modern spelling was adopted in 1882 when the area became a district of the North West Territories (it would later become a province in 1905).

Nunavut
In the Inuit language of Inuktitut, Nunavut means “our land”. Nunavut became Canada’s third territory when it was officially separated from the Northwest Territories in 1999.

Yukon
The territory’s name probably comes from the word “Yu-kun-ah” meaning “great river.”

An observation of Markiplier TV

Emphasis on the observation part because I’ve never really been good with theories. I have a number of things to do today but unfortunately, I watched this video and now I can’t stop thinking about it. Hopefully this’ll quiet my mind and let me function, and who knows? Maybe it’ll help someone out there with their own theories too. :)

So, let’s talk about this scene:

We got one hell of a group here BUT what I’d like to focus on is their seating arrangement and what that could mean, because if there’s anything I’ve learned in videos like this it’s that EVERYTHING is by design. This entire table scene (props to the Editor btw) has so much hidden psychological subtext in it, so while I’m no professional I’ll still do my best to uncover them all.

First off, let’s look at the table: Rectangular with two long ends and two short ones. Pretty normal setting yeah, but is it beneficial to their situation (i.e. finding a way to ‘take control’) where everyone easily agrees? Nope. Because tables like these embody competition and a clear sense of authority, and I love this detail. It means that while they could’ve easily gone for a round table to promote cooperation, they go for this because of course, no one’s going to cooperate that easily.

This setting, however, works better in the business cooperative world, because you got two people (Darkiplier & Wilford) who can control the meeting from both ends of the table and are essentially the people everyone will need to look up to.

Here’s a great detail though: In this kind of setting, the more powerful of the two is usually the one opposite the entrance to the room. This allows him not just a vantage point of whoever comes in and goes, but complete control as well. And as we see where King of the Squirrels pops up:

Originally posted by antisepticjack

Which we can easily tell was from the right of the room based on the direction his body and eyes shift to, we can point out where the entrance is and who was right there:

But yeah, in this moment it didn’t seem like Will had control over King’s sudden entrance but let’s face it: he doesn’t care. He already knows that there’s more than one king in that room.

Speaking of, let’s move on to the seating arrangement.

Obviously we got Dark and Will at the ends as the higher ups, but I’d like to talk about Googleplier and The Host.

In medieval times, kings would often have their advisors right at their side at the table. This actually explains the term “right hand man”, because the king would have them close at hand to help him rule, unless of course, he was left-handed. Looking back at Dark’s antics, I have reason to believe that he’s either left-handed or ambidextrous.

Originally posted by http-darkiplier-403forbidden

Which I guess would make sense, considering that while Ed, Bim, Silver and Dr. Iplier were all concerned about their parts in the video, only Google and The Host were able to keep a level head and not lose sight of their main goal/situation.

Now the last thing I want to talk about is Wilford’s idea for Markiplier TV. I must warn you though because this is going to be a bit of a stretch so stop reading if you’d like BUT… I think he may have been inspired by Anti.

AGAIN, please bear with me. Jack’s mentioned before that Dark and Anti ever meeting each other was very unlikely, which in Dark’s case (being the alter ego that’s been pushed inside the most) could be more than true. However, Wilford makes up for this as he’s the only one not bound by the laws of physics and is, potentially, omnipresent. So it’s possible that he’s aware of Anti (since he was aware of Septiplier after all) and his methods (i.e. using social media to have his fans notice him which then gives him control) BUT, being Wilford, he goes about it in his own roundabout way which is, of course, TELEVISION.

So, yeah, this is all I can come up with. Excluding my attempt in theorizing at the very end I hope this was helpful. Now I’m just hoping that my thoughts on Antisepticeye don’t get too hectic and end up like this long wall of text. Thanks for reading. :)