tepeyac

Pilgrims reaching the Tepeyac on their knees carrying images to be blessed. The Virgin of Guadalupe, is considered by Mesoamericans Tonantzin that means Our Mother in Nahuatl indigenous language. Pilgrimage to the Basilica of Our Lady of Guadalupe, Tepeyac hill, Mexico City, Mexico - Peregrinos llegando al Tepeyac de rodillas con imágenes para ser bendecidas. La Virgen de Guadalupe es considerada Tonantzin, que significa Nuestra Madre en el idioma indígena náhuatl. Peregrinación a la Basílica de Santa Maria de Guadalupe, Cerro del Tepeyac, Ciudad de México, México. www.chicosanchez.com

#guadalupe #pilgrimage #basilica #mexican #mexico #tepeyac #mexicocity #virginmary #virgenmaria #mother #madre #tonantzin #chicosanchez #peregrinacion #celebrations #traditions #pilgrims #peregrinos #kneeling #crossing #crosswalk #portrait #retrato #jude #judas #tadeo #thaddeus #road #calzada (en Calzada De Guadalupe)

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From Tonantzin to Virgen de Guadalupe: How Myths Are Created to Erase Memory

The tradition of bringing offerings to Tepeyacac, today known as Tepeyac, predates the Spanish by at least a thousand years.

Originally, it honored the winter solstice. Soon after the invasion of Mexico, Franciscan monks established a church on Tepeyac where once stood a temple honoring Mother Earth.

Tonantzin, which is often translated as “Mother Earth,” is Nahuatl for “Our Revered Mother,” a title used in much the same way ‘Nuestra Señora’ is used today.

On December 9, 1531, a Nahuatl-speaking man by the name of Juan Diego Cuauhtlatoatzin is said by Catholic lore to have received an apparition from a woman who told him to tell the Friar to build a teocalli, a temple, in her honor on the hill. Soon after, a Catholic church was built there.

Experts and historians have long challenged this account, many seeing it as a myth created by the Catholic Church to covert Mexico’s Indigenous Peoples.

Religious scholars refer to the act of replacing spiritual sites and combining symbols and images as a means of religious conversion as spiritual synchronicity.

Image Credit: Idalia Robles De León

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Dance from Tlalixtaquilla, Guerrero, pray after performing a dance to Mesoamerican goddess Tonantzin, meaning Our Mother in Nahuatl, in the Tepeyac hill, during the pilgrimage to the Basilica of Our Lady of Guadalupe in Mexico City, Mexico - Danzantes de Tlalixtaquilla, Guerrero, rezan después de bailar una danza a la diosa mesoamericana Tonantzin, que significa Nuestra Madre en náhuatl, en el cerro del Tepeyac, durante la peregrinación a la Basílica de Santa Maria de Guadalupe, Ciudad de México, México. www.chicosanchez.com

#guadalupe #pilgrimage #basilica #mexican #mexico #mexicocity #tepeyac #folk #traditions #celebrations #dancers #dancing #danzante #Tlalixtaquilla #guerrero #feathers #penacho #plumas #indigena #indian #indigenous #nativeamerican #india #mesoamericana #baile #silhouette #portrait (en Basilica of Our Lady of Guadalupe)

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St. Juan Diego

Thousands of people gathered in the Basilica of Our Lady of Guadalupe July 31, 2002, for the canonization of Juan Diego, to whom the Blessed Mother appeared in the 16th century. Pope John Paul II celebrated the ceremony at which the poor Indian peasant became the Church’s first saint indigenous to the Americas.

The Holy Father called the new saint “a simple, humble Indian” who accepted Christianity without giving up his identity as an Indian. “In praising the Indian Juan Diego, I want to express to all of you the closeness of the church and the pope, embracing you with love and encouraging you to overcome with hope the difficult times you are going through,” John Paul said. Among the thousands present for the event were members of Mexico’s 64 indigenous groups.

First called Cuauhtlatohuac (“The eagle who speaks”), Juan Diego’s name is forever linked with Our Lady of Guadalupe because it was to him that she first appeared at Tepeyac hill on December 9, 1531. The most famous part of his story is told in connection with the Feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe (December 12). After the roses gathered in his tilma were transformed into the miraculous image of Our Lady of Guadalupe, however, little more is said about Juan Diego.

In time he lived near the shrine constructed at Tepeyac, revered as a holy, unselfish and compassionate catechist who taught by word and especially by example.

During his 1990 pastoral visit to Mexico, Blessed John Paul II confirmed the long-standing liturgical cult in honor of Juan Diego, beatifying him. Twelve years later he was proclaimed a saint.

La fiesta del 12 de diciembre

La fiesta que actualmente se hace en México el 12 de diciembre en honor a la Virgen de Guadalupe, era antes de la conquista el día en que se celebraba a Tonantzin. La palabra Tonantzin sirve como un ejemplo sencillo y muy bonito de cómo funciona el náhuatl. Tonantzin está compuesta por:

To = nuestra
Nantli = madre
Tzin =  es un sufijo que tiene dos funciones, es un diminutivo (como “ito” o “ita” en el español) y además, culturalmente indica respeto - similar, por así decirlo a “Don” o “Doña”.

Entonces: To + nantli + tzin = ToNanTzin.

Tonantzin significa, entonces, nuestra madrecita. Y nuestra madrecita es la Tierra.

La fiesta que actualmente se hace en México el 12 de diciembre en honor a la Virgen de Guadalupe, era antes de la conquista el día en que se celebraba a la tierra.

                               

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                                                      El grabado es, por supuesto, del excelentísimo José Guadalupe Posada.
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tetepehua / compartir

Sculptures of Our Lady of Guadalupe in the Tepeyac hill, during the pilgrimage to the Basilica of Our Lady of Guadalupe in Mexico City, Mexico - Imagenes de la Virgen de Guadalupe en el cerro del Tepeyac, durante la peregrinación a la Basílica de Santa Maria de Guadalupe, Ciudad de México, México. www.chicosanchez.com

#guadalupe #pilgrimage #basilica #mexican #mexico #tepeyac #mexicocity #sculpture #virginmary #virgenmaria #pink #rosa #door #puertas #mother #madre #tonantzin #chicosanchez #tlaloc #cross (en Basilica of Our Lady of Guadalupe)

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Visions of a #blackMadonna at #Tepeyac. Rare depictions of the black virgin in statues and art have been revered as having special significance and working miracles, and may have origins in pre-Christian #matriarchal worship…

#workinprogress #wip #myart #mystic #viergenoire #avemaria #drawing #coloredpencil #ishtar #inanna #coatlalopeuh

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