tensile

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NewCity’s ART 50 2016 | Anne Wilson ( Fiber and Material Studies)

Among the list of 50 Chicago based visionaries featured on the NewCity’s Art 50 of 2016, 34 of those mentioned are fellow SAIC community members including staff, alumni and honorary degree recipients!  

“Working between performance, video, textile, fiber and sundry other media, Anne Wilson’s practice defies easy categorization. Coming off of a year as a prestigious United States Artists Distinguished Fellow, Wilson continues to stretch the tensile limits of her practice. Last year, she was included in “Pathmakers: Women in Art, Craft and Design, Midcentury and Today” at the Museum of Arts and Design in New York and “Art_Textiles” at the Whitworth Art Gallery in Manchester, England. She has a show this fall at the 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art in Kanazawa, Japan and a solo show at Rhona Hoffman in 2017.” (Via Newcity)

View the entire SAIC community featured on the list here

Images via Artist’s Website, (Walking Chicago, 2008)

In the Hellenistic period, artists were interested in more than just standard ideal figures. Bronze—surpassing marble with its tensile strength, reflective effects, and ability to hold fine detail—was employed for dynamic compositions, dazzling displays of the nude body, and graphic expressions of age and character.

This image is of an athlete, fresh from competition, with a realistic disheveled head of hair. The finely chiseled strands are swept up and around in different directions creating this dynamic hairstyle. 

Now on view in Power and Pathos at the Getty Center through November 1. 


Statue of an Athlete (Apoxyomenos), A.D. 1-90. Kunsthistorisches Museum Wien, Antikensammlung. Image courtesy of and © KHM-Museumsverband. Collection of Greek and Roman Antiquities / Ephesos Museum

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Building a rope bridge with flying machines

Research from ETH Zurich demonstrates the construction of a human walkable bridge using flying drones working in unison:

The video shows quadrocopters autonomously assembling a rope bridge. This is part of a body of research in aerial construction, a field that addresses the construction of structures with the aid of flying machines.

In this work, a rope bridge that can support the crossing of a person is built by quadrocopters, showing for the first time that small flying machines are capable of autonomously realizing load-bearing structures at full-scale and proceeding a step further towards real-world scenarios. Except for the required anchor points at both ends of the structure, the bridge consists exclusively of tensile elements and its connections and links are entirely realized by flying machines. Spanning 7.4 m between two scaffolding structures, the bridge consists of nine rope segments for a total rope length of about 120 m and is composed of different elements, such as knots, links, and braids. The rope used for these experiments is made out of Dyneema, a material with a low weight-to-strength ratio and thus suitable for aerial construction. Of little weight (7 g per meter), a 4 mm diameter rope can sustain 1300 kg.

More Here

[Hat-Tip - samim]

Statue of an Athlete (Apoxyomenos), A.D. 1-90.


In the Hellenistic period, artists were interested in more than just standard ideal figures. Bronze—surpassing marble with its tensile strength, reflective effects, and ability to hold fine detail—was employed for dynamic compositions, dazzling displays of the nude body, and graphic expressions of age and character.

This image is of an athlete, fresh from competition, with a realistic disheveled head of hair. The finely chiseled strands are swept up and around in different directions creating this dynamic hairstyle.

Artificial Muscles from Fishing Line and Sewing Thread. "The high cost of powerful, large-stroke, high-stress artificial muscles has combined with performance limitations such as low cycle life, hysteresis, and low efficiency to restrict applications. We demonstrated that inexpensive high-strength polymer fibers used for fishing line and sewing thread can be easily transformed by twist insertion to provide fast, scalable, nonhysteretic, long-life tensile and torsional muscles. Extreme twisting produces coiled muscles that can contract by 49%, lift loads over 100 times heavier than can human muscle of the same length and weight, and generate 5.3 kilowatts of mechanical work per kilogram of muscle weight, similar to that produced by a jet engine.“ Via.

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“Remember: your bones have the tensile strength of iron and you were forged in the heart of a star. Being soft doesn’t make you fragile. It’s the brittle metals that break.” [x]